Strong Institute

Strong Institute

The Strong Institute is a leader in the science of applied musical rhythm and custom auditory programs. www.stronginstitute.com

08/09/2021

Focus Your Brain with Syncopated Rhythms

In this video, I share a technique using syncopated rhythms you can use to improve your focus based on what I did when I was in music school. I play an example of this technique so you can see if it works for you. Below is a link to a download with rhythms you can play yourself.

https://www.stronginstitute.com/focus-your-brain-with-syncopated-rhythms/

06/04/2021

Case Study: 5 year old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS

Case Study: 5 year old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS

https://www.stronginstitute.com/case-study-5-year-old-female-with-sensory-processing-disorder-and-pdd-nos/

Abby was a happy, energetic and friendly five-year-old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS. She was adopted at 15 months and, according to the limited medical records available, may have had a minor brain injury or been sensorily deprived during her time at the orphanage. Since being adopted Abby received therapy services to address her sensory issues.

When Abby completed the REI Custom Program intake her issues were as follows:

Anxiety: Abby was anxious over transitioning from one activity or environment to another and afraid of loud and stimulating public places. She tended to lash out (scratching, hitting) others when over-stimulated or anxious. She would rock her body back and forth and engage in other repetitive behaviors to self-soothe. She was also notably fearful of the dark and of monsters.

Inattention: Her mother reported that Abby had difficulty focusing and staying on task. She was easily distractible and restless and fidgety when asked to attend to a task. She would often act impulsively, though she was not a thrill-seeker.

Language delay: Abby had difficulty expressing herself. She often repeated words or phrases, had difficulty with pronunciation and enunciation, often reversed her pronouns, and had problems finding the right words to say even if she knew them.

Sensory seeking behavior: Abby was a highly energetic child who would seek highly stimulating activities. She often craved pressure to self-soothe. She had difficulty with motor planning and didn’t know where she was in space, frequently bumping into others.

Sensory aversion: In spite of her sensory seeking behavior, Abby was also often sensory aversive. She was easily startled, reacted aggressively to light or unexpected touch, and disliked physical contact.

Social interaction difficulties: Abby prefered to interact with her family and had difficulty knowing how to engage with other children. She required prompts to interact unless it was a high-energy activity, such as playing tag.

Abby listened to her REI Custom Program recording once a day at various times based on her schedule. Times were generally between 8am and 10am or between 6pm and 8pm.

Many people ask about the best time of day to play their REI recording. In the long run it doesn’t matter – we can achieve the same net results as long as the current recording is played once a day. In the short run, the time of day you play the REI recording can have an impact on behavior for that day.

Abby’s varying schedule illustrates this concept really well. For example, she seemed calmed by the recording when it was played. In the evening this made the transition to bedtime easier. Even on the first day of listening, her mother reported that she was more compliant with her routine of brushing her teeth and putting on pajamas when she listened at 7pm.

When listening in the morning (8am) Abby also demonstrated calm from her REI recording. She dressed without complaint and allowed her mother to comb her hair without fidgeting. This calm effect seemed to last: According to teacher reports, Abby did a better job following directions and staying on task on the days she listened in the morning.

Abby benefited well from the calming effect of her recording regardless of when it was played, so the best schedule for her was one in which her mother could find the time to play the recording.

After 2 weeks Abby showed improvements in:

Eye contact. This was noticed not only by Abby’s parents but also her teacher, who in one instance, remarked how Abby looked her in the eye and said she understood when her teacher explained that Abby could play with her friends after school if she followed directions during the day. She complied and was able to follow directions.

Transitions. She was less reactive/resistant to going to bed and school.

Language: Began using full sentences.

Sensory defensiveness. She was less bothered by having hair combed and would sit quietly rather than fidget or pull away.

Abby was clearly getting a fair amount of stimulation from her REI recording, which allowed for some good initial gains. On the flip side, she also craved more sensory input such as jumping on a trampoline and running around.

For her next recording we chose to address her sensory seeking behavior, knowing we would be slowing the progress of her language improvements, as sensory modulation and language development require two different types of REI stimulation. Her other issues, anxiety and attention, generally didn’t require this shifting focus since we can address them in each context. Over the remainder of her REI Custom Program we alternated the focus of Abby’s program between language/social and sensory.

This meant that each new track pushed one area forward while stalling, and some cases slightly back-tracking, the other. For example, during track #5 Abby showed significant improvements overall in her ability to appropriately interact with other children and her language showed improvement. While at the same time, she still needed to seek sensory input by jumping and swinging and she exhibited anxiety, particularly over loud noises, the dark, and monsters.

On the other hand, during track #4, when we focused on the sensory processing, Abby showed improvement in sensory seeking activities such as running and jumping and engaged in more quiet activities including pretend play. Her langauge, however, regressed. She returned to repeating words and phrases, something she stopped doing once she began her program. Her mother felt that some of the vocal perseveration was due to anxiety over her school situation – there was a new student in the class that was impulsive and loud – but this behavior matches the give and take that can happen when switching the focus of an REI Custom Program.

Over the next several months Abby made progressive gains across the board from this alternating pattern in REI stimulation levels. Most notable from the start of the program were:

Language: She was now using pronouns properly more consistently. The fluidity and composition of her sentences also improved significantly.

Social: She was interacting more appropriately with other children. She was more talkative with them and was able to engage without needing prompts from adults.

Anxiety: Overall Abby was less resistant to transitioning to and from school and with her bedtime routine. She still exhibited some anxiety when she was tired or over-stimulated.

Attention: Abby was more compliant with directions from her parents, therapists and teachers and was better able to attend and stay on a task asked of her.

Sensory seeking behavior. She was less compulsive about seeking sensory input from running, jumping or swinging. During the last three tracks of her program she exhibited some self-stimulatory behaviors, such as rocking and jumping, but the timing of this matches with her returning school where there are other children who are anxiety provoking to her (crying and screaming)

Sensory Aversion. This area improved most notably in her reduced resistance to having her hair combed. She was also better able to handle noisy environments, though she could still get over-stimulated by them if she is tired.

Abby continues to listen to REI recordings as we adjust her recordings to further her progress.

Learn more about the REI Custom Program:
https://www.stronginstitute.com/rei-custom-program/

06/03/2021

Ritalin vs REI Drumming For Focusing Attention (hint: REI wins)

An adult client with ADD conducted an experiment: He compared two different doses of the stimulant medication Ritalin to his custom-made REI drumming music. I share his results in this video.

At the end of the video, you will find an example of the types of rhythms I use for focus. These are played on my Gonga drum. Play the rhythms quietly in the background as you do some focused work.

Watch the video here: https://www.stronginstitute.com/complex-rei-drumming-beats-ritalin-for-focusing-attention/

If you want longer sessions, sign up for a free (no credit card needed) Brain Shift Radio trial: https://brainshiftradio.com/

Learn more about the REI Custom Program: https://www.stronginstitute.com/rei-custom-program/

Learn to play the drum for healing: https://www.stronginstitute.com/training-courses/drum-healing-course/

05/29/2021

Calm your child with REI.

For 25 years, Jeff Strong has shown how listening to fast, complex drumming can calm the brain in just minutes.

Sign up for a free Calm audio track:
https://www.stronginstitute.com/blog/custom-calm-opt-in/

05/22/2021

Case Study: 5 year old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS

https://www.stronginstitute.com/case-study-5-year-old-female-with-sensory-processing-disorder-and-pdd-nos/

Abby was a happy, energetic and friendly five-year-old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS. She was adopted at 15 months and, according to the limited medical records available, may have had a minor brain injury or been sensorily deprived during her time at the orphanage. Since being adopted Abby received therapy services to address her sensory issues.

When Abby completed the REI Custom Program intake her issues were as follows:

Anxiety: Abby was anxious over transitioning from one activity or environment to another and afraid of loud and stimulating public places. She tended to lash out (scratching, hitting) others when over-stimulated or anxious. She would rock her body back and forth and engage in other repetitive behaviors to self-soothe. She was also notably fearful of the dark and of monsters.

Inattention: Her mother reported that Abby had difficulty focusing and staying on task. She was easily distractible and restless and fidgety when asked to attend to a task. She would often act impulsively, though she was not a thrill-seeker.

Language delay: Abby had difficulty expressing herself. She often repeated words or phrases, had difficulty with pronunciation and enunciation, often reversed her pronouns, and had problems finding the right words to say even if she knew them.

Sensory seeking behavior: Abby was a highly energetic child who would seek highly stimulating activities. She often craved pressure to self-soothe. She had difficulty with motor planning and didn’t know where she was in space, frequently bumping into others.

Sensory aversion: In spite of her sensory seeking behavior, Abby was also often sensory aversive. She was easily startled, reacted aggressively to light or unexpected touch, and disliked physical contact.

Social interaction difficulties: Abby prefered to interact with her family and had difficulty knowing how to engage with other children. She required prompts to interact unless it was a high-energy activity, such as playing tag.

Abby listened to her REI Custom Program recording once a day at various times based on her schedule. Times were generally between 8am and 10am or between 6pm and 8pm.

Many people ask about the best time of day to play their REI recording. In the long run it doesn’t matter – we can achieve the same net results as long as the current recording is played once a day. In the short run, the time of day you play the REI recording can have an impact on behavior for that day.

Abby’s varying schedule illustrates this concept really well. For example, she seemed calmed by the recording when it was played. In the evening this made the transition to bedtime easier. Even on the first day of listening, her mother reported that she was more compliant with her routine of brushing her teeth and putting on pajamas when she listened at 7pm.

When listening in the morning (8am) Abby also demonstrated calm from her REI recording. She dressed without complaint and allowed her mother to comb her hair without fidgeting. This calm effect seemed to last: According to teacher reports, Abby did a better job following directions and staying on task on the days she listened in the morning.

Abby benefited well from the calming effect of her recording regardless of when it was played, so the best schedule for her was one in which her mother could find the time to play the recording.

After 2 weeks Abby showed improvements in:

Eye contact. This was noticed not only by Abby’s parents but also her teacher, who in one instance, remarked how Abby looked her in the eye and said she understood when her teacher explained that Abby could play with her friends after school if she followed directions during the day. She complied and was able to follow directions.

Transitions. She was less reactive/resistant to going to bed and school.

Language: Began using full sentences.

Sensory defensiveness. She was less bothered by having hair combed and would sit quietly rather than fidget or pull away.

Abby was clearly getting a fair amount of stimulation from her REI recording, which allowed for some good initial gains. On the flip side, she also craved more sensory input such as jumping on a trampoline and running around.

For her next recording we chose to address her sensory seeking behavior, knowing we would be slowing the progress of her language improvements, as sensory modulation and language development require two different types of REI stimulation. Her other issues, anxiety and attention, generally didn’t require this shifting focus since we can address them in each context. Over the remainder of her REI Custom Program we alternated the focus of Abby’s program between language/social and sensory.

This meant that each new track pushed one area forward while stalling, and some cases slightly back-tracking, the other. For example, during track #5 Abby showed significant improvements overall in her ability to appropriately interact with other children and her language showed improvement. While at the same time, she still needed to seek sensory input by jumping and swinging and she exhibited anxiety, particularly over loud noises, the dark, and monsters.

On the other hand, during track #4, when we focused on the sensory processing, Abby showed improvement in sensory seeking activities such as running and jumping and engaged in more quiet activities including pretend play. Her langauge, however, regressed. She returned to repeating words and phrases, something she stopped doing once she began her program. Her mother felt that some of the vocal perseveration was due to anxiety over her school situation – there was a new student in the class that was impulsive and loud – but this behavior matches the give and take that can happen when switching the focus of an REI Custom Program.

Over the next several months Abby made progressive gains across the board from this alternating pattern in REI stimulation levels. Most notable from the start of the program were:

Language: She was now using pronouns properly more consistently. The fluidity and composition of her sentences also improved significantly.

Social: She was interacting more appropriately with other children. She was more talkative with them and was able to engage without needing prompts from adults.

Anxiety: Overall Abby was less resistant to transitioning to and from school and with her bedtime routine. She still exhibited some anxiety when she was tired or over-stimulated.

Attention: Abby was more compliant with directions from her parents, therapists and teachers and was better able to attend and stay on a task asked of her.

Sensory seeking behavior. She was less compulsive about seeking sensory input from running, jumping or swinging. During the last three tracks of her program she exhibited some self-stimulatory behaviors, such as rocking and jumping, but the timing of this matches with her returning school where there are other children who are anxiety provoking to her (crying and screaming)

Sensory Aversion. This area improved most notably in her reduced resistance to having her hair combed. She was also better able to handle noisy environments, though she could still get over-stimulated by them if she is tired.

Abby continues to listen to REI recordings as we adjust her recordings to further her progress.

Learn more about the REI Custom Program:
https://www.stronginstitute.com/rei-custom-program/

04/05/2021

Focus Your Brain With Complex Drumming Rhythms

In this video, I play my Gonga drum at about 8 beats-per-second to focus your brain. Though these rhythms use the same tempo as the Calm for Anxiety rhythms of my last video, their complex structure will focus your nervous system – a sharp contrast from the musically-variable rhythms needed to calm anxiety.

Catch the full track and description here:
https://www.stronginstitute.com/focus-your-brain-with-complex-drumming-rhythms/

You may download or stream the free Calm for Anxiety track here: https://www.stronginstitute.com/calm-for-anxiety/

Learn more about my auditory brain stimulation programs at https://www.stronginstitute.com/rei-custom-program/

Listen to my music for free at https://www.brainshiftradio.com

Learn to play the drum for healing at https://www.stronginstitute.com/training-courses/drum-healing-course/

04/02/2021

Join Beyond Shamanism and Receive My Energy Healing Course for Free

Today is your last chance to receive my Chakra Energy Healing Course when you join my Beyond Shamanism Course, (offer ends at midnight tonight)

https://www.stronginstitute.com/training-courses/beyond-shamanism-course/

Explore Core Shamanism

This program begins with an introduction to core shamanism. Core shamanism consists of three components: altered consciousness, visualization, and ceremonial intent. To facilitate the altered state--called the shamanic state of consciousness (SSC)--I use the drum. Practitioners around the world also use chemicals to achieve SSC, but I believe the drum and its rhythms provide more control over the latter two components of visualization and ceremony.

You will embark on traditional shamanic vision-quests--called journeys--to develop and clarify your inner vision. You will learn to set the space for your journeys through ceremony and intent. You will explore how to properly interpret your journeys so you can apply your knowledge to your life in a positive way.

Go Beyond Core Shamanism

This course then goes beyond the confines of traditional core shamanism. I will expand on core shamanic techniques with variations on rhythm, tempo, and visualization to harness the power of shamanic ideas through meditation, creativity, intuition, problem-solving, and manifesting, among others. The drum-driven meditations will help you access specific brainwave states that will facilitate your work.

I will explain the science supporting these techniques and examine the following concepts:

The neurology defining the shamanic state of consciousness
The drum as a vehicle for changing states of consciousness
How specific brainwave states enhance shamanic work
The impact of rhythm and tempo
How auditory driving and entrainment influence visualizations and meditations
The purpose of ceremony and how to create meaningful ceremonies
Why specific rhythms quiet your mind for successful meditations
How shamanic techniques can help you release anxiety and re-frame past trauma

Chakra Energy Healing Perfectly Complements This Course

I'm excited to include my Chakra Energy Healing Course with Beyond Shamanism because I think they are perfectly suited to work together to give you more tools for your spiritual journey. Where Beyond Shamanism focuses mostly on deep theta (4 beat-per-second) meditations and journeys, Chakra Energy Healing employs meditations at 4, 6, and 8 beats-per-second. This adds another dimension to your meditations and will strengthen your visualization skills.

Sign up today:
https://www.stronginstitute.com/training-courses/beyond-shamanism-course/

03/27/2021

How to Calm a Sensitive Sensory System

Easily overwhelmed. Highly sensitive. Hyper-sensitive.

Does this describe you or your child?

In this video, I show you how I calm a sensitive sensory system using muted tones and variable drumming rhythms at about 8 beats-per-second.

Watch the video and download an MP3 of a longer drumming-only file of the performance at: https://www.stronginstitute.com/how-to-calm-a-sensitive-sensory-system/

Play this track at a low volume for episodic support to calm your sensory system.

03/19/2021

REI Drumming Improves Concentration in Elementary School Children

Inspired by his experience as the Director of the School for Special Education of Needs (the Spreng-El) in the Netherlands and the diagnosis of ADD (attention-deficit disorder) for one of his twin sons, Wim Oostra decided to explore the effects of REI drumming on concentration for students in his school.

This study examined 100 elementary-aged children in a double-blind, placebo-controlled format. Students performed four separate CPTs (Continuous Performance Tests), consisting of two tests with no music and two tests with either a placebo music recording or REI music tracks. Children were randomly assigned to the placebo or REI test group.

The results showed a significant improvement in attention for those who listened to the REI recording over both the silence and placebo conditions. The silence group produced an average score of 23, the placebo group scored at 31, and the REI Rhythm group scored an average of 68 (the best result of the three).

The results of this independent study have been encouraging and align with the improvements in attention that we have seen in our own studies and client results.

Read the article here:

https://www.stronginstitute.com/resources/a-study-for-improved-concentration-by-acoustic-drum-rhythms-music-medicine-therapy/

Learn more about my REI drumming at https://www.stronginstitute.com/rei-custom-program/

Listen to my music for free at https://brainshiftradio.com

Learn to play the drum for healing at https://www.stronginstitute.com/training-courses/drum-healing-course/

03/18/2021

REI Rhythms Beat Ritalin for Adult with Attention Deficit Disorder

43-year-old William was diagnosed with ADD as an adult. Though the effects of his prescribed Ritalin were noticeable, they were less than ideal. He quickly went from 10mg to 20mg per day, but still wasn't performing as well as he'd like. In searching for an alternative solution to the medication, he chose to use a custom-made recording of Rhythmic Entrainment Intervention (REI) music.

This study followed William's experience comparing REI drumming to two different doses of the ADD stimulant medication, Ritalin (10mg and 20mg). Using quantitative measures of scores from the Test of Variables of Attention (T.O.V.A.), four conditions were examined: Baseline (no meds or music), 10mg of Ritalin taken 90 minutes before the test, 20mg of Ritalin taken 90 minutes before the test, and while listening to REI music rhythms.

William's baseline score was -12.74, putting him squarely in the AD/HD camp (anything below a score of 0.00 suggests attention problems).

His score with 10mg of Ritalin was a slightly improved -6.60 while his 20mg Ritalin score showed a significant improvement with a score of -3.47.

His score when listening to the REI focusing music, the same tracks you will find in the Focus category of Brain Shift Radio, was a near-normal score of -1.87.

This improvement was nearly 50% greater than the better of the Ritalin scores.

These results suggest that REI offers a strong alternative to Ritalin (and other stimulant medications used for ADD).

The advantages of REI drumming include an absence of side-effects, individual customization to achieve the optimal stimulation level for each person, and improved sustained attention.

Read the full article here:
https://www.stronginstitute.com/resources/rei-rhythms-beat-ritalin-for-adult-with-attention-deficit-disorder/

Learn about my auditory brain stimulation programs at https://www.stronginstitute.com/rei-custom-program/

Listen to my music for free at https://brainshiftradio.com

Learn to play the drum for healing at https://www.stronginstitute.com/training-courses/drum-healing-course/

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Videos (show all)

Focus Your Brain with Syncopated RhythmsIn this video, I share a technique using syncopated rhythms you can use to impro...
Case Study: 5 year old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS
Ritalin vs REI Drumming For Focusing Attention (hint: REI wins)
How to Calm a Sensitive Sensory System
Calm Your Child with REI
Case Study: 5 year old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS
How to Calm a Sensitive Sensory System
Ritalin vs REI Drumming For Focusing Attention (hint: REI wins)
Case Study: 5 year old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS
Case Study: 5 year old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS
Case Study: 5 year old female with Sensory Processing Disorder and PDD-NOS
Ritalin vs REI Drumming For Focusing Attention (hint: REI wins)

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