Rundle College

Rundle College

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My son is moving to your school in the new term- we are looking for him for a lift from Glenwood House in the mornings at 07:00 to Rundle- happy to make petrol contributions- thank you Maranda
Contact or ask for Chantel
Thank You Rundle College for presenting a very delightful Grandparents day. Thank You for the effort you put into this day. Olivia van Reenen grandmother of Ben and Amelie Raubenheimer.
SCHOOL SHIRTS FOR SALE!

3 x Mens (S) AND 3 x Ladies

Slightly used, good second hand at reduced price!

Contact 083-455-3060
Lushe Mynhardt 3rd place for Performance Riding Level 5
3rd place for Dressage Prelim 3
3rd place for Inhand Utility
Well done Lushe!!

Progressive Education ; Extraordinary People Rundle College offers relevant education, all the while taking cognisance of the need to provide its young students with the skills to meet life's challenge s whilst adhering to a clear-cut set of values.

Students are afforded the opportunity to function in a constructive and stimulating environment; and together with the advanced educational programme it is a setting that will encourage and promote the freedom to express oneself. Discipline remains important and is a fundamental feature of Rundle College. Whilst Rundle College is challenging educational boundaries, it is done in a considered manne

Operating as usual

25/10/2021

The Importance of Music and Singing in Early Child Development

Music is part of all of our lives. It brings back memories, it makes you want to dance and move, and it can take you back to your childhood.

A lot is going on in our brains when we make or listen to music. Music is a good exercise for the brain. Growing research has proven that music can improve maths skills, reading, school attendance and confidence. While Maths, Literature, Science and Social Studies are the fundamental building blocks that our society is built upon, music enhances these subjects as it improves language skills, critical thinking skills, emotional moderation and all around brain function.

Music is unique. It demands focus, vision and critical thinking while promoting individualism and creativity.
Music helps young students express themselves and regulate their emotions in a unique way which motivates their learning and helps build their self- confidence. It enhances the way children can process language and speech. Music is a universal language. It helps children connect to other cultures and understand the world around them.

Scientists say that children exposed to music, or those who play an instrument, do better at school than those who don’t. Music is one of life’s simple joys. It helps calm the mind. It is fun and playing a music instrument, be it a tambourine or a drum, helps relieve stress.

During our class music lessons at Rundle, we strive to expose our young learners to the various aspects of music like rhythm, beat, pitch, tempo, dramatization, singing and free expression.

Candi van As
Rundle Preparatory

The Importance of Music and Singing in Early Child Development

Music is part of all of our lives. It brings back memories, it makes you want to dance and move, and it can take you back to your childhood.

A lot is going on in our brains when we make or listen to music. Music is a good exercise for the brain. Growing research has proven that music can improve maths skills, reading, school attendance and confidence. While Maths, Literature, Science and Social Studies are the fundamental building blocks that our society is built upon, music enhances these subjects as it improves language skills, critical thinking skills, emotional moderation and all around brain function.

Music is unique. It demands focus, vision and critical thinking while promoting individualism and creativity.
Music helps young students express themselves and regulate their emotions in a unique way which motivates their learning and helps build their self- confidence. It enhances the way children can process language and speech. Music is a universal language. It helps children connect to other cultures and understand the world around them.

Scientists say that children exposed to music, or those who play an instrument, do better at school than those who don’t. Music is one of life’s simple joys. It helps calm the mind. It is fun and playing a music instrument, be it a tambourine or a drum, helps relieve stress.

During our class music lessons at Rundle, we strive to expose our young learners to the various aspects of music like rhythm, beat, pitch, tempo, dramatization, singing and free expression.

Candi van As
Rundle Preparatory

23/10/2021

Golf for beginners: So your child wants to play #golf? #KeNakoAcademy welcomes junior beginners of all ages.

Contact 044 874 0370 to sign up. #SkillsforLife

Golf for beginners: So your child wants to play #golf? #KeNakoAcademy welcomes junior beginners of all ages.

Contact 044 874 0370 to sign up. #SkillsforLife

22/10/2021

#RundleNews Stretching keeps the muscles flexible, strong, and healthy.

#RundleNews Stretching keeps the muscles flexible, strong, and healthy.

21/10/2021

#RundleNews For the love of furry friends. Former #RundleCollege Head Girl of 2016, Dannah Mostert, came to support the Rundle Run SPCA Charity Drive that took place on Saturday, 9 October. She crossed the finish line in 2nd place with a time of 29m43s. Thank you for the support, Dannah! She has been focused on her fitness and been training to complete longer distances. Wishing you all the best with your fitness goals.

#RundleNews For the love of furry friends. Former #RundleCollege Head Girl of 2016, Dannah Mostert, came to support the Rundle Run SPCA Charity Drive that took place on Saturday, 9 October. She crossed the finish line in 2nd place with a time of 29m43s. Thank you for the support, Dannah! She has been focused on her fitness and been training to complete longer distances. Wishing you all the best with your fitness goals.

20/10/2021

#RundleNews How to make a lemon battery? Yes, you read that right. The citric acid in the lemon acts as an electrolyte, a solution that conducts electricity. The Grade 2 students had a blast building circuits using lemons. #science #scienceexperiment #lemonbattery

#RundleNews How to make a lemon battery? Yes, you read that right. The citric acid in the lemon acts as an electrolyte, a solution that conducts electricity. The Grade 2 students had a blast building circuits using lemons. #science #scienceexperiment #lemonbattery

Rundle Run in aid of animals 20/10/2021

Rundle Run in aid of animals

For the love of furry friends! We hope to see you on 6 November for the next Rundle Run!

Rundle Run in aid of animals GEORGE NEWS - The Rundle Run, organised by...

19/10/2021

Woolworths is proudly celebrating their 90th birthday during the month of October – celebrating nine decades of making a difference since 1931.

Make a sustainable difference for us when swiping at Woolworths.

Link your MySchool and Woolworths cards

To link your cards, choose one of these easy options:
Download the MySchool App (Login = card number; default password = your ID)
Online: www.myschool.co.za (Login = card number; default password = your ID)
Call: 0860 100 445
Email: [email protected]

Woolworths is proudly celebrating their 90th birthday during the month of October – celebrating nine decades of making a difference since 1931.

Make a sustainable difference for us when swiping at Woolworths.

Link your MySchool and Woolworths cards

To link your cards, choose one of these easy options:
Download the MySchool App (Login = card number; default password = your ID)
Online: www.myschool.co.za (Login = card number; default password = your ID)
Call: 0860 100 445
Email: [email protected]

19/10/2021

#RundleNews A testimonial from former student Carolin Schlüter

After graduating from high school in Germany in 2016, I did not know exactly what I wanted to study. In order to make good use of the time after my Abitur (A-level), I decided to improve my English by spending some time abroad in South Africa. Since I had already traveled to South Africa several times with my family and friends of our family live in George, I became familiar with #RundleCollege. The internationally recognized Cambridge school system convinced me to spend my year abroad at Rundle College and KeNako Golf and Sports Academy.

During my school year in South Africa, I attended various courses and took several AS and A-level exams, which was very challenging for me as a foreigner. In total, I spent almost a year in South Africa. During this time, I also did an internship with an architect firm in George, which showed me that I could pursue a professional future in the field.

Back in Germany, I then began a Bachelor's Degree in Industrial Engineering for Construction and Real Estate near Hamburg. My studies consisted of a practical and theoretical part. I completed the theoretical part in Hamburg and the practical part in Berlin, where I worked as a Project Manager for a company specializing in tenant fit-outs for office buildings. Since there were also many projects with international customers such as Apple or TheOfficeGroup, I had an advantage with my year abroad and was able to manage the project in English without any problems.

Especially with my master studies in the field of Resource Efficiency in Architecture and Planning, which I started in October this year in Hamburg, I realized again how valuable my year abroad and the time at Rundle College and KeNako Academy was, not only for me personally, but especially for my education. Again, my AS and A-level exams gave me great advantages over other applicants for the course. As this is an international course with students from all over the world and is taught exclusively in English, there was a high demand for English language skills. Because the Cambridge system is also highly regarded in Germany, I did not need to take any further tests for the application process and only had to submit my Cambridge certificates from South Africa.

I would like to thank Dr. Colesky and the entire Rundle College for this valuable and exciting year abroad and for the fact that this time has contributed to a large extent to my academic success.

Carolin Schlüter
Progressive Education; Extraordinary People

#RundleNews A testimonial from former student Carolin Schlüter

After graduating from high school in Germany in 2016, I did not know exactly what I wanted to study. In order to make good use of the time after my Abitur (A-level), I decided to improve my English by spending some time abroad in South Africa. Since I had already traveled to South Africa several times with my family and friends of our family live in George, I became familiar with #RundleCollege. The internationally recognized Cambridge school system convinced me to spend my year abroad at Rundle College and KeNako Golf and Sports Academy.

During my school year in South Africa, I attended various courses and took several AS and A-level exams, which was very challenging for me as a foreigner. In total, I spent almost a year in South Africa. During this time, I also did an internship with an architect firm in George, which showed me that I could pursue a professional future in the field.

Back in Germany, I then began a Bachelor's Degree in Industrial Engineering for Construction and Real Estate near Hamburg. My studies consisted of a practical and theoretical part. I completed the theoretical part in Hamburg and the practical part in Berlin, where I worked as a Project Manager for a company specializing in tenant fit-outs for office buildings. Since there were also many projects with international customers such as Apple or TheOfficeGroup, I had an advantage with my year abroad and was able to manage the project in English without any problems.

Especially with my master studies in the field of Resource Efficiency in Architecture and Planning, which I started in October this year in Hamburg, I realized again how valuable my year abroad and the time at Rundle College and KeNako Academy was, not only for me personally, but especially for my education. Again, my AS and A-level exams gave me great advantages over other applicants for the course. As this is an international course with students from all over the world and is taught exclusively in English, there was a high demand for English language skills. Because the Cambridge system is also highly regarded in Germany, I did not need to take any further tests for the application process and only had to submit my Cambridge certificates from South Africa.

I would like to thank Dr. Colesky and the entire Rundle College for this valuable and exciting year abroad and for the fact that this time has contributed to a large extent to my academic success.

Carolin Schlüter
Progressive Education; Extraordinary People

18/10/2021

Tales of a Teacher

I always get this sinking feeling when it’s my turn to write an article - not because I don’t like writing, but because I never know what to write about and I can go over it in my mind for days, jumping from one topic to the next. So I’ve decided to write about my experiences as a teacher in the UK and Vietnam.

After working in schools in the UK as a substitute teacher for a short stint in 2005, I decided to call it quits. I never wanted to be a teacher ever again. It really bothered me that I was there to help students, and all I got was disrespect and an attitude towards teachers as though you were the lowest of the low. I became totally disillusioned and decided to retreat into the safety of my previous career as a lab technician.

Fast forward to 2017. On the 27th of October of that year I landed in Ho Chi Minh City, the old Saigon, in the south of Vietnam, to take up a post as a maths and science teacher in government schools. It was a huge adjustment - new culture, humidity that made you sweat in places you didn’t even know you had sweat glands, manic traffic and lots of noise.

A few days later I found myself standing in front of a classroom of beautiful Vietnamese children - thankfully, all using English names! I worked in various schools across the city, and one on the outskirts. The children had many questions. One of the first ones they always asked was,”How old are you?” It was not considered inappropriate to ask a foreign teacher that. Some of the kids in one of the more rural schools even started calling me by my first name! I think we made a welcome break from their very strict school teachers who, I think, still meted out corporal punishment.

The children in general were interested in learning and many had ambitions of studying abroad in a Western country. Sometimes, of course, it was the parents’ ambition, wishing for a better life and better opportunities for their children which they most likely would not have had in a country that was relatively poor and still is, especially in rural parts.

Schooling took up much of the kids’ lives - from grade 7 they had to go to school until 12 on Saturdays as well. And then, of course, there were the English lessons that many kids had to attend at language centres scattered across the city, often on Sundays or after school in the evenings. I felt sorry for them. They were just way too young to have such pressure and responsibility on their shoulders.

We’ve recently celebrated International Teacher’s Day. Vietnam also has a National Teacher’s Day. On this day the parents and children show their appreciation for the teachers by giving them gifts. Some of the gifts I received included cash and beautiful fabric I used to have a traditional outfit called “ao dai” made. Not only do they celebrate teachers, but they also welcome the grade 6’s into high school during a ceremony with lots of music and dance (and much noise!). It was so lovely for me to be part of these celebrations.

I’m still navigating my way through the challenges of teaching, sometimes doubting myself as a teacher and sometimes trying to find that emergency exit to make a quick escape! But then I remind myself that it’s not about me, it’s about these precious young lives that I’ve been entrusted with. My wish is that I can really help them become the best version of themselves in all the facets of their lives.

Ms Kritzinger
Mathematics

Tales of a Teacher

I always get this sinking feeling when it’s my turn to write an article - not because I don’t like writing, but because I never know what to write about and I can go over it in my mind for days, jumping from one topic to the next. So I’ve decided to write about my experiences as a teacher in the UK and Vietnam.

After working in schools in the UK as a substitute teacher for a short stint in 2005, I decided to call it quits. I never wanted to be a teacher ever again. It really bothered me that I was there to help students, and all I got was disrespect and an attitude towards teachers as though you were the lowest of the low. I became totally disillusioned and decided to retreat into the safety of my previous career as a lab technician.

Fast forward to 2017. On the 27th of October of that year I landed in Ho Chi Minh City, the old Saigon, in the south of Vietnam, to take up a post as a maths and science teacher in government schools. It was a huge adjustment - new culture, humidity that made you sweat in places you didn’t even know you had sweat glands, manic traffic and lots of noise.

A few days later I found myself standing in front of a classroom of beautiful Vietnamese children - thankfully, all using English names! I worked in various schools across the city, and one on the outskirts. The children had many questions. One of the first ones they always asked was,”How old are you?” It was not considered inappropriate to ask a foreign teacher that. Some of the kids in one of the more rural schools even started calling me by my first name! I think we made a welcome break from their very strict school teachers who, I think, still meted out corporal punishment.

The children in general were interested in learning and many had ambitions of studying abroad in a Western country. Sometimes, of course, it was the parents’ ambition, wishing for a better life and better opportunities for their children which they most likely would not have had in a country that was relatively poor and still is, especially in rural parts.

Schooling took up much of the kids’ lives - from grade 7 they had to go to school until 12 on Saturdays as well. And then, of course, there were the English lessons that many kids had to attend at language centres scattered across the city, often on Sundays or after school in the evenings. I felt sorry for them. They were just way too young to have such pressure and responsibility on their shoulders.

We’ve recently celebrated International Teacher’s Day. Vietnam also has a National Teacher’s Day. On this day the parents and children show their appreciation for the teachers by giving them gifts. Some of the gifts I received included cash and beautiful fabric I used to have a traditional outfit called “ao dai” made. Not only do they celebrate teachers, but they also welcome the grade 6’s into high school during a ceremony with lots of music and dance (and much noise!). It was so lovely for me to be part of these celebrations.

I’m still navigating my way through the challenges of teaching, sometimes doubting myself as a teacher and sometimes trying to find that emergency exit to make a quick escape! But then I remind myself that it’s not about me, it’s about these precious young lives that I’ve been entrusted with. My wish is that I can really help them become the best version of themselves in all the facets of their lives.

Ms Kritzinger
Mathematics

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