326th Airborne Medical Company, 101st ABD HQ, Reenacted

326th Airborne Medical Company, 101st ABD HQ, Reenacted

326th Airborne Medical Company is the medical section of 101st Airborne Division Headquarters (Reenacted).

We portray medics, doctors and nurses of the 101st Airborne and supporting units.

79th Anniversary of D-Day (FR) 14/06/2023

Recreation of the division hospital outside Hiesville, Normandy, France.

Château Colombiere near Hiesville. It was used as the 101st Airborne Divisional Hospital by the the 326th Airborne Medical Company in June 1944.

22/12/2019

With the town of Bastogne now completely encircled and cut off, the Germans sent an envoy to elicit the surrender of the garrison. BG McAuliffe was very busy when the message was delivered to him at the division headquarters. Upon reading it he responded "Ah, nuts" and set it aside. A little while later a staff officer reminded him that they still needed to send a reply. When he stated that he wasn't sure how to word a response, a staff officer told him that he thought his first response was pretty good. McAuliffe, not wanting to really waste time with the surrender demand, instructed them to type it up.
Gen. McAuliffe's one-word response now sits among the legendary responses of defiance in all military history.

16/12/2019

Today marks the 75th Anniversary of the beginning of what became known as the Battle of the Bulge. The battle would truly be a “rendezvous with destiny” for the 101st Airborne Division. The 326th AMC would play a significant, albeit somewhat tragic, role in the upcoming engagement.

On this day in 1944, the Battle of the Bulge began. The Germans launched a massive offensive operation, code-named Operation Wacht am Rhine (“The Watch on the Rhine” which was the title of a German patriotic song), through the Ardennes forest. Hitler's goal was to split the British forces from the Americans, re-capture Antwerp, and force the Allies to negotiate a peace agreement. The 101st Airborne Division was resting and refitting at Mourmelon as one of the European Theater's few reserves. They would soon be sent to stem the tide, which would lead them to the crucial crossroads city of Bastogne.

17/11/2019

More excellent photos from our European friends. 6 nurses of the 50th Field Hospital were attached to the 101st during operations in Holland. An excellent reenactment in a wonderful setting.

Our last event in the field this year was WWII Field Hospital display in Diest, Belgium, where we portrayed Army Nurses of the 50th Field Hospital. At the invitation of Airborne Medical Reenactment Group Europe (AMRGE), we had a unique chance to be part of live display, which included several rooms converted into WWII hospital and a considerable number of patients and medical personnel incl. Medical Officers, Medical Technicians and Orderlies, as well as Army Nurses. During the day, each of us performed assigned duties in receiving / triage, first aid, surgery or ward. Our friends from Holland and Belgium taught us a lot of useful things, such as bandaging of different parts of the body, wound suturing, removal of shrapnel, giving injections, assisting at surgical operations and many more. All patients wore professional special effect make-up which made the whole experience very realistic. We also had a chaplain and war correspondent present at the display. We would like to thank everyone in AMRGE for taking such a good care of us in Belgium and we can't wait to work with you again!

29/10/2019

Three of the Last WWII Screaming Eagles

Today, 75 years ago, three men of the 326th Medical Company, 101st Airborne Division, lost their lives during two German consecutive attacks by planes that day: 1st LT. Everett C. Vogt, 1st LT. Louis G. Schadegg, and PVT. James E. Petropol. This was a highly unusual incident, as the company lost throughput the whole war 23 soldiers; most of them were casualties during the D-Day campaign in Normandy (14 KIA).

The 326th Airborne Medical Company’s AAR of December 11, 1944, described what happened on that fateful day:
“The Company continued to operate a Clearing Station in its initial location at Nijmegen until 13:30 hrs, October 29, 1944, at which time it was bombed. Since the Station had been struck by AP bombs at 10:00 hrs and by rockets at 11:30 hrs, it was deemed advisable to move the unit to a new location following the bombing which rendered the building untenable; all windows having been blown out.
“The Company suffered 3 killed and 6 wounded as a result of the bombing. In addition, 2 attached personnel were wounded. The493rd Medical Collecting Company, which was evacuating the 326th personnel, lost 2 men and 4 wounded. At the time of the bombing, two trucks from the 397th Quartermaster Truck Company were in the Station delivering rations. The Company was moved to the area occupied by the 24th Evacuation Hospital where it spent the night of 29 October 1944. The following morning it was moved to the Division Rear CP where it continued to operate.”

1st LT. Everett Charles Vogt was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 13, 1917. After his graduation from High School, he attended St. Louis University where he was a business manager of the Glee Club and had a bachelor in science. He registered in the Army in Kirkwood, Missouri on October 16, 1940. LT. Vogt was united in marriage with Elizabeth C. Vogt, date and location is unknown. They had met at Camp Claiborne, located in Rapides Parish, central Louisiana. Mrs. Vogt was serving as an Army nurse at Claiborne.

1st LT. Everett C. Vogt was Killed in Action at the Clearing Station of 326th Airborne Medical Company near Nijmegen, on October 29, 1944, just two weeks after he had turned 27 years old. At the time, he had been in the Army for three years and had served for 15 months overseas. LT. Vogt was first buried at the Temporary American Military Cemetery Molenhoek, the Netherlands (Code 4655, Block F, Row 1, Grave 3). He was later re-buried at the Netherlands American Cemetery at Margraten (Code 4601; Block G, Row 3, Grave 18). LT. Vogt was preceded in death by his father, Everett C. Vogt, who died on August 22, 1937, at the age of 50 years old. He left behind his wife, Elizabeth C. Vogt, and mother, Rose M. Vogt.

For his meritorious conduct in action, and for paying the ultimate sacrifice in battle, 1st LT. Louis G. Schadegg was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster. He was also bestowed with a Bronze Star Medal for valor. He may have also received or either qualified for some of these awards, medals and commendations: the Parachutist Badge, the World War II Victory Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, and the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal.

1st LT. Louis G. Schadegg was born in Whitman County, in the state of Washington on March 13, 1913. After his graduation from High School at Lind Public Schools, he studied for four years at the Washington State Normal School at Cheney Historic District, now Eastern Washington University. He received his master degree from Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington, after which he held a job as a laboratory technician and assistant. On April 22, 1942, he enlisted in the Army in Spokane. He had almost two years of pre-medical training and qualified as a medical parachutist while he was stationed in England. He participated in the D-Day operations with the 326th in Normandy, France and the operations in the Netherlands was his second major combat period.

1st LT. Louis G. Schadegg was Killed in Action at the Clearing Station of 326th Airborne Medical Company near Nijmegen, on October 29, 1944, at the age of 31 years old. LT. Schadegg was first buried at the Temporary American Military Cemetery Molenhoek, Netherlands (Code 4655, Block F, Row 1, Grave 8). He was later re-buried at the Netherlands American Cemetery at Margraten (Code 4601; Block K, Row 1, Grave 6). He left behind his parents, George J. and Elizabeth Frances (Glowczewsky) Schadegg, and a brother (Francis J “Frank” Schadegg).

For his meritorious conduct in action, and for paying the ultimate sacrifice in battle, 1st LT. Louis G. Schadegg was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart Medal. He may have also received or either qualified for some of these awards, medals and commendations: the Parachutist Badge, the World War II Victory Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, and the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal.

PVT. James Earl Petrepol was born in Athens, Georgia on August 7, 1925. He had followed three years of high school. His civil occupation before his service in the Army was as a semi-skilled chauffeur. He enlisted in the Army at Fort McPherson, Atlanta, Georgia on October 13, 1943.

PVT. James E. Petrepol was Killed in Action at the Clearing Station of 326th Airborne Medical Company near Nijmegen, on October 29, 1944, at the age of 19 years old. PVT. Petropol is buried at the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia (Section 12, Site 8051). He left behind a father, Peter G. Petropol, who was born in Greece, and a brother (A.G. Petropol).

For his meritorious conduct in action, and for paying the ultimate sacrifice in battle, PVT. James E. Petrepol was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart Medal. He may have also received or either qualified for some of these awards, medals and commendations: the Parachutist Badge, the World War II Victory Medal, the American Campaign Medal, and the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal.

While he probably was overseas, his mother Willie Coline Petropol lost her life in a tragic accident on February 6, 1944. She walked into a southbound Central of Georgia passenger train. She was walking with her daughter in law, Mrs. A. G. Petropol, and grandson, who managed to jump back out of the way in time.

REST IN PEACE, TROOPERS!

OUR FLAG DOES NOT FLY BECAUSE THE WIND MOVES IT. IT FLIES WITH THE LAST BREATH OF EACH SOLDIER WHO DIED PROTECTING IT.

20/10/2019

A pair of 326th troopers, June 1944.

18/10/2019

Interview with Willis P. McKee, April 12th, 1986

This is a link to an extensive interview with Captain Willis P. McKee, 326th Airborne Medical Company. The interview was done in 1986. The interview covers Captain McKee’s experiences from preparing for D-Day to his jump into Normandy through Holland operations and to Bastogne. During the siege of Bastogne he was captured along with the majority of the Division medical company. He details his experiences as a prisoner of war through his release at the conclusion of the war. The interview is about 3.5 hours long.

https://nunncenter.net/ohms-spokedb/render.php?cachefile=1986oh123_ww045_ohm.xml

nunncenter.net Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral Hitory

10/10/2019

326th Airborne Medical Company is the medical side of the 101st Airborne Division HQ (Reenacted). As the divisional medical company, we portray the officers (doctors, dentists, pharmacists, administrative), enlisted men (surgical and medical techs, drivers, litter bearers) of the 101st ABD during World War 2. We also portray attached surgical teams (3rd Auxiliary Surgical unit), who were the first army surgeons to be air inserted into a combat zone; attached Army nurses including 50th Field Hospital "B" Platoon, and Field Hospital personnel attached to division during various operations.

"It is Doc's job to protect his brothers from death, to knock him aside and say, 'Not today'".

10/10/2019

326th Airborne Medical Company, 101st ABD HQ, Reenacted's cover photo

10/10/2019

326th Airborne Medical Company, 101st ABD HQ, Reenacted

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