The Woodlands Water Agency

The Woodlands Water Agency

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Houston Chronicle: “Homes in The Woodlands could sink by more than a foot over decades under new groundwater rules.”
https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Homes-in-The-Woodlands-could-sink-by-more-than-a-16752150.php
Alert from San Jacinto River Authority SJRA: SJRA received notification of two water line leaks in The Woodlands. Woodlands Water Agency and SJRA are at the locations. Woodlands Water will notify those with impacted service at Lake Front Circle at Aviator Pier near Hughes Landing and Lake Front Circle at East Shore Drive. Please be aware of slow traffic and a lane closure in the area. Thank you for your patience while we work to assess this unexpected interruption.
SERVICE ALERT, 9:21 AM: A Woodlands Water crew is repairing a water line break in the East Shore neighborhood. Water will be off during repairs along Southern Coast Drive East and West Breezy Way East and West Rafters Row and Low Country Lane. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.
Bob Dailey's guide to water-saving plants: Catalpa (Catalpa bignoniodes). Also known as the Fish Bait Tree because the caterpillars that feed on the leaves are great fish bait. Another name for this catalpa species is the "Cigar Tree" because the seed pods resemble ci**rs. Catalpas grow well in any soil and are drought tolerant once established. They generally like moist bottomlands or edges of woods. A catalpa can grow to 100 feet. These trees are deciduous, and the winter outline is striking. This species is the host for the Catalpa Sphinx Moth. Large clusters of white flowers appear in the spring followed by long beans eaten by wildlife. The flowers are especially favored by honey bees. Catalpas are ugly ducklings when small but they grow into beautiful shade trees. Photo by Stephanie Brundage. Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.
From our email for the week of 1/3... Bob Dailey's irrigation recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! Roots are still growing, but the green tops of your lawn, what we know as "grass," (not to be confused with the more colloquial use of the word) are still dormant. We may get a slight freeze tonight, and then it should be somewhat warmer for the next few days. I suspect we will get a few more hard freezes, so if you haven't winterized your backflow preventer, please do so now. You don't need your sprinkler system now anyway. During the winter storm Uri last February thousands of backflow preventer systems in Montgomery County burst, because they were not properly drained. The average cost for replacing or repairing a backflow preventer is $300.00.
SERVICE ALERT, 10:59 AM: A Woodlands Water crew is making repairs on a water line break in the Bluff Creek neighborhood. The repair is expected to take four to six hours. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.
Weather forecasts predict a possible freeze locally on Sunday night. Please winterize your irrigation backflow preventer to avoid temperature-related breakages. Here's a video on how to do that: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFLlxoTnzFY
Bob Dailey's guide to water-saving plants: American Elm (Ulmus americana) does best in sandy soil but will grow in heavy soils if well-drained. This elm is fast growing. The seeds provide food for birds and small mammals. The species can grow 60-80 ft. Dark-green leaves have variable fall colors. This is a large tree - handsome and graceful, often with enlarged buttresses at base, usually forked into many spreading branches, drooping at ends, forming a very broad, rounded, flat-topped or vaselike crown, often wider than high. It is a larval host for the Mourning Cloak, Columbia silkmoth, Question Mark butterfly, Painted Lady butterfly, Comma butterfly. Photo by Sally and Andy Wasowski. Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.
From our email for the week of 12/27... Bob Dailey's weekly irrigation recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! There is a slight chance of rain this week, but I would hold off from irrigating this week. I still have mud on my boots while visiting a new home in the county to check out their yard (at the owner's request). I came away with mud on my boots, which tells me that there is still water in the soil. Besides, as I have said many, many, many times before, grass goes dormant in the winter. You shouldn't be watering anyway.
Bob Dailey's Guide to Water-Saving Plants: Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua). One of the first questions asked about this tree is "why is it called sweetgum?" The name comes from early pioneers who observed Native Americans removing the bark of this tree and then scraping off the resin and chewing it. Pioneers took up the habit and called it "sweetgum." This is a large, open-crowned tree which can grow to 75 feet tall (and up to 130 feet in the wild). The glossy green, star-shaped deciduous leaves turn purple and red om the late fall. The fruit is a globular, thorny ball about an inch in diameter and will last on a long stem until January. Sweetgum is an important timber tree, second only to oaks. It is also important in furniture making. Photo by Sally and Andy Wasowski Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

The Woodlands Water Agency

Operating as usual

Homes in The Woodlands could sink by more than a foot over decades under new groundwater rules 01/06/2022

Homes in The Woodlands could sink by more than a foot over decades under new groundwater rules

Houston Chronicle: “Homes in The Woodlands could sink by more than a foot over decades under new groundwater rules.”
https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Homes-in-The-Woodlands-could-sink-by-more-than-a-16752150.php

Homes in The Woodlands could sink by more than a foot over decades under new groundwater rules The vote deals a blow to those who fought for a more cautious approach to well water...

01/05/2022

Alert from San Jacinto River Authority SJRA: SJRA received notification of two water line leaks in The Woodlands. Woodlands Water Agency and SJRA are at the locations. Woodlands Water will notify those with impacted service at Lake Front Circle at Aviator Pier near Hughes Landing and Lake Front Circle at East Shore Drive. Please be aware of slow traffic and a lane closure in the area. Thank you for your patience while we work to assess this unexpected interruption.

01/05/2022

SERVICE ALERT, 9:21 AM: A Woodlands Water crew is repairing a water line break in the East Shore neighborhood. Water will be off during repairs along Southern Coast Drive East and West Breezy Way East and West Rafters Row and Low Country Lane. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

SERVICE ALERT, 9:21 AM: A Woodlands Water crew is repairing a water line break in the East Shore neighborhood. Water will be off during repairs along Southern Coast Drive East and West Breezy Way East and West Rafters Row and Low Country Lane. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

01/04/2022

Bob Dailey's guide to water-saving plants: Catalpa (Catalpa bignoniodes). Also known as the Fish Bait Tree because the caterpillars that feed on the leaves are great fish bait. Another name for this catalpa species is the "Cigar Tree" because the seed pods resemble ci**rs. Catalpas grow well in any soil and are drought tolerant once established. They generally like moist bottomlands or edges of woods. A catalpa can grow to 100 feet. These trees are deciduous, and the winter outline is striking. This species is the host for the Catalpa Sphinx Moth. Large clusters of white flowers appear in the spring followed by long beans eaten by wildlife. The flowers are especially favored by honey bees. Catalpas are ugly ducklings when small but they grow into beautiful shade trees. Photo by Stephanie Brundage. Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Bob Dailey's guide to water-saving plants: Catalpa (Catalpa bignoniodes). Also known as the Fish Bait Tree because the caterpillars that feed on the leaves are great fish bait. Another name for this catalpa species is the "Cigar Tree" because the seed pods resemble ci**rs. Catalpas grow well in any soil and are drought tolerant once established. They generally like moist bottomlands or edges of woods. A catalpa can grow to 100 feet. These trees are deciduous, and the winter outline is striking. This species is the host for the Catalpa Sphinx Moth. Large clusters of white flowers appear in the spring followed by long beans eaten by wildlife. The flowers are especially favored by honey bees. Catalpas are ugly ducklings when small but they grow into beautiful shade trees. Photo by Stephanie Brundage. Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

01/04/2022

From our email for the week of 1/3... Bob Dailey's irrigation recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! Roots are still growing, but the green tops of your lawn, what we know as "grass," (not to be confused with the more colloquial use of the word) are still dormant. We may get a slight freeze tonight, and then it should be somewhat warmer for the next few days. I suspect we will get a few more hard freezes, so if you haven't winterized your backflow preventer, please do so now. You don't need your sprinkler system now anyway. During the winter storm Uri last February thousands of backflow preventer systems in Montgomery County burst, because they were not properly drained. The average cost for replacing or repairing a backflow preventer is $300.00.

From our email for the week of 1/3... Bob Dailey's irrigation recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! Roots are still growing, but the green tops of your lawn, what we know as "grass," (not to be confused with the more colloquial use of the word) are still dormant. We may get a slight freeze tonight, and then it should be somewhat warmer for the next few days. I suspect we will get a few more hard freezes, so if you haven't winterized your backflow preventer, please do so now. You don't need your sprinkler system now anyway. During the winter storm Uri last February thousands of backflow preventer systems in Montgomery County burst, because they were not properly drained. The average cost for replacing or repairing a backflow preventer is $300.00.

01/01/2022

SERVICE ALERT, 10:59 AM: A Woodlands Water crew is making repairs on a water line break in the Bluff Creek neighborhood. The repair is expected to take four to six hours. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

SERVICE ALERT, 10:59 AM: A Woodlands Water crew is making repairs on a water line break in the Bluff Creek neighborhood. The repair is expected to take four to six hours. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

12/30/2021
12/30/2021

Weather forecasts predict a possible freeze locally on Sunday night. Please winterize your irrigation backflow preventer to avoid temperature-related breakages. Here's a video on how to do that: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFLlxoTnzFY

Weather forecasts predict a possible freeze locally on Sunday night. Please winterize your irrigation backflow preventer to avoid temperature-related breakages. Here's a video on how to do that: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFLlxoTnzFY

12/28/2021

Bob Dailey's guide to water-saving plants: American Elm (Ulmus americana) does best in sandy soil but will grow in heavy soils if well-drained. This elm is fast growing. The seeds provide food for birds and small mammals. The species can grow 60-80 ft. Dark-green leaves have variable fall colors. This is a large tree - handsome and graceful, often with enlarged buttresses at base, usually forked into many spreading branches, drooping at ends, forming a very broad, rounded, flat-topped or vaselike crown, often wider than high. It is a larval host for the Mourning Cloak, Columbia silkmoth, Question Mark butterfly, Painted Lady butterfly, Comma butterfly. Photo by Sally and Andy Wasowski. Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Bob Dailey's guide to water-saving plants: American Elm (Ulmus americana) does best in sandy soil but will grow in heavy soils if well-drained. This elm is fast growing. The seeds provide food for birds and small mammals. The species can grow 60-80 ft. Dark-green leaves have variable fall colors. This is a large tree - handsome and graceful, often with enlarged buttresses at base, usually forked into many spreading branches, drooping at ends, forming a very broad, rounded, flat-topped or vaselike crown, often wider than high. It is a larval host for the Mourning Cloak, Columbia silkmoth, Question Mark butterfly, Painted Lady butterfly, Comma butterfly. Photo by Sally and Andy Wasowski. Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

12/28/2021

From our email for the week of 12/27... Bob Dailey's weekly irrigation recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! There is a slight chance of rain this week, but I would hold off from irrigating this week. I still have mud on my boots while visiting a new home in the county to check out their yard (at the owner's request). I came away with mud on my boots, which tells me that there is still water in the soil. Besides, as I have said many, many, many times before, grass goes dormant in the winter. You shouldn't be watering anyway.

From our email for the week of 12/27... Bob Dailey's weekly irrigation recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! There is a slight chance of rain this week, but I would hold off from irrigating this week. I still have mud on my boots while visiting a new home in the county to check out their yard (at the owner's request). I came away with mud on my boots, which tells me that there is still water in the soil. Besides, as I have said many, many, many times before, grass goes dormant in the winter. You shouldn't be watering anyway.

12/24/2021
12/16/2021

Bob Dailey's Guide to Water-Saving Plants: Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua). One of the first questions asked about this tree is "why is it called sweetgum?" The name comes from early pioneers who observed Native Americans removing the bark of this tree and then scraping off the resin and chewing it. Pioneers took up the habit and called it "sweetgum." This is a large, open-crowned tree which can grow to 75 feet tall (and up to 130 feet in the wild). The glossy green, star-shaped deciduous leaves turn purple and red om the late fall. The fruit is a globular, thorny ball about an inch in diameter and will last on a long stem until January. Sweetgum is an important timber tree, second only to oaks. It is also important in furniture making. Photo by Sally and Andy Wasowski Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Bob Dailey's Guide to Water-Saving Plants: Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua). One of the first questions asked about this tree is "why is it called sweetgum?" The name comes from early pioneers who observed Native Americans removing the bark of this tree and then scraping off the resin and chewing it. Pioneers took up the habit and called it "sweetgum." This is a large, open-crowned tree which can grow to 75 feet tall (and up to 130 feet in the wild). The glossy green, star-shaped deciduous leaves turn purple and red om the late fall. The fruit is a globular, thorny ball about an inch in diameter and will last on a long stem until January. Sweetgum is an important timber tree, second only to oaks. It is also important in furniture making. Photo by Sally and Andy Wasowski Courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

12/16/2021

From our email for the week of 12/13... Bob Dailey's Irrigation Recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! A scant amount of rain during the last seven days, but turf is still dormant, and the ground is still wet. I would not irrigate. Be tough with your grass. To quote Michael Pollan, "A Lawn is nature under totalitarian rule." Several things about the weather we might want to be aware of, if it's any interest to anyone: 1. Temperatures to date (for December) have been, on average, higher than the previous eight years. 2. Precipitation has averaged pretty much level (that is little or no rain) for the same period. I also urge you to check the Texas Drought Monitor. Approximately 75% of the state is either abnormally dry, in moderate drought, or severe drought.

From our email for the week of 12/13... Bob Dailey's Irrigation Recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! A scant amount of rain during the last seven days, but turf is still dormant, and the ground is still wet. I would not irrigate. Be tough with your grass. To quote Michael Pollan, "A Lawn is nature under totalitarian rule." Several things about the weather we might want to be aware of, if it's any interest to anyone: 1. Temperatures to date (for December) have been, on average, higher than the previous eight years. 2. Precipitation has averaged pretty much level (that is little or no rain) for the same period. I also urge you to check the Texas Drought Monitor. Approximately 75% of the state is either abnormally dry, in moderate drought, or severe drought.

Winterizing your sprinkler system, irrigation system backflow freeze prevention - WATR NEWS 12/07/2021

Winterizing your sprinkler system, irrigation system backflow freeze prevention - WATR NEWS

Freezing weather can cause your backflow system on your yard irrigation system to burst. This video describes how to winterize your system for when cold weather approaches our area.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFLlxoTnzFY

Winterizing your sprinkler system, irrigation system backflow freeze prevention - WATR NEWS How to keep your irrigation or sprinkler system from freezing during cold winter months. Information to help prevent your pipes from freezing. winterizing y...

12/07/2021

Bob Dailey's guide to invasive plants: Japanese honeysuckle
(Lonicera japonica). Japanese honeysuckle was introduced into Long Island, New York in 1806 as an ornamental plant that would double as an erosion control method. (The same can be said of Kudzu and salt cedar, as well as a number of other plants.) The plant is highly invasive and exists extensively from Florida to Texas and north to Maine and Wisconsin, an area covering a large portion of the nation. It's considered invasive because of its proclivity to twin around other plants and kill them. The plants most affected are shrubs and saplings, which Japanese honeysuckle girdles and kills. It also forms large tangles that smother and kill vegetation. For more information about Japanese honeysuckle, visit the Texas Invasives Database. Native alternatives would be Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens), Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata), and Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata). You can find descriptions. planting help, and more information about these four plants at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center website. Photographer unknown. Licensed by CC BY-NC-ND

Bob Dailey's guide to invasive plants: Japanese honeysuckle
(Lonicera japonica). Japanese honeysuckle was introduced into Long Island, New York in 1806 as an ornamental plant that would double as an erosion control method. (The same can be said of Kudzu and salt cedar, as well as a number of other plants.) The plant is highly invasive and exists extensively from Florida to Texas and north to Maine and Wisconsin, an area covering a large portion of the nation. It's considered invasive because of its proclivity to twin around other plants and kill them. The plants most affected are shrubs and saplings, which Japanese honeysuckle girdles and kills. It also forms large tangles that smother and kill vegetation. For more information about Japanese honeysuckle, visit the Texas Invasives Database. Native alternatives would be Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens), Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata), and Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata). You can find descriptions. planting help, and more information about these four plants at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center website. Photographer unknown. Licensed by CC BY-NC-ND

12/07/2021

From our email for the week of 12/6... Bob Dailey's irrigation recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! Your turf is dormant and I wouldn't water it. In fact, if you haven't turned off your irrigation controller, I would do it now. Watering regularly now will only harm the grass. I also wouldn't cut it every week. Perhaps every two to three weeks or maybe just once a month if it looks really shabby. shabby. Did you know that there is a newly formed local chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas? The name of the chapter is Pines and Prairies and covers Montgomery, Grimes, and Walker Counties. The website offers a cornucopia of useful knowledge about native plants, local native plant landscapers, book recommendations, and much more information. As an extra bonus, native plants significantly decrease the need for irrigation and fertilization.

From our email for the week of 12/6... Bob Dailey's irrigation recommendation: No irrigation is recommended this week! Your turf is dormant and I wouldn't water it. In fact, if you haven't turned off your irrigation controller, I would do it now. Watering regularly now will only harm the grass. I also wouldn't cut it every week. Perhaps every two to three weeks or maybe just once a month if it looks really shabby. shabby. Did you know that there is a newly formed local chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas? The name of the chapter is Pines and Prairies and covers Montgomery, Grimes, and Walker Counties. The website offers a cornucopia of useful knowledge about native plants, local native plant landscapers, book recommendations, and much more information. As an extra bonus, native plants significantly decrease the need for irrigation and fertilization.

11/30/2021

Bob Dailey's guide to invasive plants: Chinese Privet, also known as ligustrum (Ligustrum sinense). One of the worst invasive plants in Texas and certainly in The Woodlands and throughout Montgomery Count. Chinese privet dominates the shrub layer and forces out natives. It escapes easily from yards. Chinese privet can be directly harmful to humans. It can cause nausea, headaches, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, low blood pressure, and body temperature. How to get rid of Chinese privet:
• Don't purchase it or plant it in the landscape (best solution).
• Chop down all existing bushes in early spring.
• Treat the stumps and any new sprouts with industrial (20%) vinegar.

Bob Dailey's guide to invasive plants: Chinese Privet, also known as ligustrum (Ligustrum sinense). One of the worst invasive plants in Texas and certainly in The Woodlands and throughout Montgomery Count. Chinese privet dominates the shrub layer and forces out natives. It escapes easily from yards. Chinese privet can be directly harmful to humans. It can cause nausea, headaches, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, low blood pressure, and body temperature. How to get rid of Chinese privet:
• Don't purchase it or plant it in the landscape (best solution).
• Chop down all existing bushes in early spring.
• Treat the stumps and any new sprouts with industrial (20%) vinegar.

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Our mission is to be your resource for water use, costs, quality and conservation in The Woodlands.

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2455 Lake Robbins Dr
The Woodlands, TX
77380

General information

The Woodlands Joint Powers Agency is the central management agency for the eleven Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs) that currently serve The Woodlands in Montgomery County. The services we provide are water distribution, wastewater collection, storm drainage and tax collection services. The principal objective of TWJPA is to provide the MUDs we serve with professional, reliable and quality services consistent with fiscal responsibility. We are also committed to improving our efficiency and effectiveness at maintaining the utility infrastructure and enhancing communication with our customers.

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Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm
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