Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning

Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning

HVAC installations and services, available NYC , NJ - Bergen County, Union County and Essex County, we are certificates Master HVAC, EPA Universal, Goodman , Carrer , Trane, Daikin, Mitsubishi, Fujitsu . 7 years experience �.

Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning Service

Operating as usual

09/30/2021

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Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post 09/11/2021

Mitsubishi hyper heat system heating and cooling . Rebates that help you save money

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post 09/11/2021

Almost done

05/28/2021

Ready for new Air conditioning installation at the 6 units building Mitsubishielectric#tranemitsubishi

Ready for new Air conditioning installation at the 6 units building Mitsubishielectric#tranemitsubishi

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post 04/02/2021

Well done

Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning updated their address. 02/05/2021

Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning updated their address.

Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning updated their address.

02/05/2021

Filter the air in your home.
If your home has a central heating, ventilation and air conditioning system (HVAC, a system with air ducts that go throughout the home) that has a filter, do the following to help trap virus particles:

In homes where the HVAC fan operation can be controlled by a thermostat, set the fan to the “on” position instead of “auto” when you have visitors. This allows the fan to run continuously, even if heating or air conditioning is not on.
Use pleated filtersexternal icon — they are more efficient than ordinary furnace filters and can be found in hardware stores. They should be installed initially within the HVAC system by a professional, if possible. If that is not possible, carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions to replace the filter yourself.
Make sure the filter fits properly in the unit.
Change your filter every three months or according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
Ideally, have the ventilation system inspected and adjusted by a professional every year to make sure it is operating efficiently.
Consider using a portable air cleaner.
If you don’t have an HVAC system or just want extra filtration, consider using a portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cleaner. They are the most efficient filters on the market for trapping particles that people exhale when breathing, talking, singing, coughing, and sneezing.

When choosing a HEPA cleaner, select one that is the right size for the room(s). One way to do this is to select a HEPA fan system with a Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) that meets or exceeds the square footage of the room in which it will be used. The larger the CADR, the faster it will clean the air.

Turn on the exhaust fan in your bathroom and kitchen.
Exhaust fans above your stovetop and in your bathroom that vent outdoors can help move air outside. Although some stove exhaust fans don’t send the air to the outside, they can still improve air flow and keep virus particles from being concentrated in one place.

Keep the exhaust fan turned on over your stovetop and in your bathroom if you have visitors in your home.
Keep the exhaust fans turned on for an hour after your visitors leave to help remove virus particles that might be in the air.

Use fans to improve air flow.
Place a fan as close as possible to an open window blowing outside. This helps get rid of virus particles in your home by blowing air outside. Even without an open window, fans can improve air flow.
Point fans away from people. Pointing fans toward people can possibly cause contaminated air to flow directly at them.
Use ceiling fans to help improve air flow in the home whether or not windows are open.
Limit the number of visitors in your home and the time spent inside.
The more people inside your home, and the longer they stay, the more virus particles can accumulate.

Limit the number of visitors in your home.
Try to gather in larger rooms or areas where you can stay at least 6 feet apart.
Be sure that everyone wears a mask while visitors are in your home. This includes the visitors as well as the people who usually live in your home.
Keep visits as short as possible.
Follow additional recommendations for hosting gatherings.

Filter the air in your home.
If your home has a central heating, ventilation and air conditioning system (HVAC, a system with air ducts that go throughout the home) that has a filter, do the following to help trap virus particles:

In homes where the HVAC fan operation can be controlled by a thermostat, set the fan to the “on” position instead of “auto” when you have visitors. This allows the fan to run continuously, even if heating or air conditioning is not on.
Use pleated filtersexternal icon — they are more efficient than ordinary furnace filters and can be found in hardware stores. They should be installed initially within the HVAC system by a professional, if possible. If that is not possible, carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions to replace the filter yourself.
Make sure the filter fits properly in the unit.
Change your filter every three months or according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
Ideally, have the ventilation system inspected and adjusted by a professional every year to make sure it is operating efficiently.
Consider using a portable air cleaner.
If you don’t have an HVAC system or just want extra filtration, consider using a portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cleaner. They are the most efficient filters on the market for trapping particles that people exhale when breathing, talking, singing, coughing, and sneezing.

When choosing a HEPA cleaner, select one that is the right size for the room(s). One way to do this is to select a HEPA fan system with a Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) that meets or exceeds the square footage of the room in which it will be used. The larger the CADR, the faster it will clean the air.

Turn on the exhaust fan in your bathroom and kitchen.
Exhaust fans above your stovetop and in your bathroom that vent outdoors can help move air outside. Although some stove exhaust fans don’t send the air to the outside, they can still improve air flow and keep virus particles from being concentrated in one place.

Keep the exhaust fan turned on over your stovetop and in your bathroom if you have visitors in your home.
Keep the exhaust fans turned on for an hour after your visitors leave to help remove virus particles that might be in the air.

Use fans to improve air flow.
Place a fan as close as possible to an open window blowing outside. This helps get rid of virus particles in your home by blowing air outside. Even without an open window, fans can improve air flow.
Point fans away from people. Pointing fans toward people can possibly cause contaminated air to flow directly at them.
Use ceiling fans to help improve air flow in the home whether or not windows are open.
Limit the number of visitors in your home and the time spent inside.
The more people inside your home, and the longer they stay, the more virus particles can accumulate.

Limit the number of visitors in your home.
Try to gather in larger rooms or areas where you can stay at least 6 feet apart.
Be sure that everyone wears a mask while visitors are in your home. This includes the visitors as well as the people who usually live in your home.
Keep visits as short as possible.
Follow additional recommendations for hosting gatherings.

02/05/2021

Bring as much fresh air into your home as possible.

Bringing fresh, outdoor air into your home helps keep virus particles from accumulating inside.

If it’s safe to do so, open doors and windows as much as you can to bring in fresh, outdoor air. While it’s better to open them wide, even having a window cracked open slightly can help.
If you can, open multiple doors and windows to allow more fresh air to move inside.
Do not open windows and doors if doing so is unsafe for you or others (for example, presence of young children and pets, risk of falling, triggering asthma symptoms, high levels of outdoor pollution).
If opening windows or doors is unsafe, consider other approaches for reducing virus particles in the air, such as using air filtration and bathroom and stove exhaust fans.

Use fans to move virus particles in the air from inside your home to outside.
Consider using a window exhaust fan if you have one. Be sure it is placed safely and securely in the window.
Another option is to place a fan as close as possible to an open window or door, blowing outside.
Don’t leave fans unattended with young children.

Bring as much fresh air into your home as possible.

Bringing fresh, outdoor air into your home helps keep virus particles from accumulating inside.

If it’s safe to do so, open doors and windows as much as you can to bring in fresh, outdoor air. While it’s better to open them wide, even having a window cracked open slightly can help.
If you can, open multiple doors and windows to allow more fresh air to move inside.
Do not open windows and doors if doing so is unsafe for you or others (for example, presence of young children and pets, risk of falling, triggering asthma symptoms, high levels of outdoor pollution).
If opening windows or doors is unsafe, consider other approaches for reducing virus particles in the air, such as using air filtration and bathroom and stove exhaust fans.

Use fans to move virus particles in the air from inside your home to outside.
Consider using a window exhaust fan if you have one. Be sure it is placed safely and securely in the window.
Another option is to place a fan as close as possible to an open window or door, blowing outside.
Don’t leave fans unattended with young children.

02/05/2021

Improving Ventilation in Your Home.

Staying home with only members of your household is the best way to keep SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) particles out of your home. However, if a visitor needs to be in your home, improving ventilation (air flow) can help prevent virus particles from accumulating in the air in your home. Good ventilation, along with other preventive actions, like staying 6 feet apart and wearing masks, can help prevent you from getting and spreading COVID-19.

Below are ways you can improve ventilation in your home. Use as many ways as you can (open windows, use air filters, and turn on fans) to help clear out virus particles in your home faster.

Improving Ventilation in Your Home.

Staying home with only members of your household is the best way to keep SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) particles out of your home. However, if a visitor needs to be in your home, improving ventilation (air flow) can help prevent virus particles from accumulating in the air in your home. Good ventilation, along with other preventive actions, like staying 6 feet apart and wearing masks, can help prevent you from getting and spreading COVID-19.

Below are ways you can improve ventilation in your home. Use as many ways as you can (open windows, use air filters, and turn on fans) to help clear out virus particles in your home faster.

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post 02/04/2021

2911A Broadway

08/02/2020

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post

07/31/2020

Well done

07/18/2020

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post

07/18/2020

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post

07/18/2020

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post

07/04/2020

Wishing everyone a very happy 4th of July. God bless America. Land of the free home of the brave.

06/28/2020

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post

05/16/2020

Well done 👍🏻 @ Manhattan, New York

01/26/2020

Sunday work day 😎

01/05/2020

Timeline Photos

12/31/2019

We all want homes that are comfortable and energy efficient. But all our efforts to replace drafty windows, seal up air leaks, and blanket wall cavities with insulation have had an unfortunate consequence: They’ve made the air in our houses less healthy to breathe. More of the airborne pollutants that once might have found their way outside—household chemicals, smoke, pet dander, and cooking gases, to name a few—are building up inside. Our well-intentioned efforts to restrict the flow of air in and out of our houses have led to indoor air-pollution levels that can be two to five times higher than those outside, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.
That doesn’t mean we should give up on making our houses tighter, of course. But it does mean now is a good time to pay as much attention to indoor air quality, or IAQ, as we do to energy efficiency. That begins by getting a better understanding of how to balance the movement of air in and out of a house, and of mechanical systems that usher in fresh air and expel stale air without compromising energy efficiency—or comfort—in all seasons. Monitoring your IAQ is a useful first step in raising awareness, too. Because when we know what we’re up against, and how to minimize our exposure, we can all breathe easier.

Houses need to breathe, too
Ventilation is the key to good indoor air quality. In the past, houses mostly relied on natural ventilation—air moving freely through windows, doors, and leaky walls—to flush out stagnant, contaminated air.
But sealing a house to prevent energy loss halts the healthy level of air exchange you get with natural ventilation. In 2012, as building codes demanded tighter construction for energy efficiency, requirements were added for whole-house mechanical ventilation. As TOH expert Richard Trethewey puts it: “If you’re going to insulate, you’ve got to ventilate.”
In most existing houses, mechanical ventilation is limited to bath fans and range hoods that exhaust steam or cooking odors. These fans remove the bad air, but often the fresh air needed to replace it—called makeup air—simply slips in through cracks in walls, down chimneys, and through basements and attached garages.

12/22/2019

Financial District, Manhattan

12/22/2019

Bay Plaza

12/22/2019
12/22/2019

Photos from Smart Move Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning's post

Our Story

Smart Move HVACis a full-service heating and air conditioning contractor serving both commercial and residential customers throughout NYC and the surrounding New York area. We specialize in the design, installation and servicing of central air conditioning, heating, ventilation systems, makeup air systems and commercial refrigeration systems.
We are one of the HVAC companies in the area and are able to provide a wide array of installation and repair services for all types of units, from the smallest split systems to rooftop heating and cooling units, ductles multi zone systems, furnaces, duct mounted electric heaters, and heat pumps.
We employ a team of heating and cooling professionals that are ready and able to help you with all of your HVAC needs. We offer heating and AC installation & repair services to both New York homeowners and commercial businesses. We are able to service most brand name equipment, such as Trane, Carrier, York, Rheem, Luxaire, United CoolAir, Task, Ruud, Fijutsu, Mitsubishi, McQuay, Goodman, Skymark, and many others.
Air Conditioner Installation, Service, Repair & Maintenance
Heating Installation, Service, Repair & Maintenance
Commercial HVAC Contractor NYC
Cool Works is your commercial air conditioning and air quality control experts - keeping you, your family, and co-workers comfortable year-round in NYC, New York. With the Cool Works Air Conditioning and Heating team on your side, , you’re choosing a full-service (service, repair, installation) air conditioning contractor that can handle of your HVAC needs. We’ll do whatever it takes to keep you as comfortable as possible, and offer a complete range of air conditioning and heating products and services to meet your needs. The professionals at Cool Works are always thoroughly equipped, fully insured, and reliable.
Commercial Heating & Air Conditioning, Commercial Refrigeration, HVAC Systems Installation & HVAC Troubleshooting

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Sunday work day 😎

Telephone

Address


1531 Hollywood Ave, Bronx
New York, NY
10461

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 6pm
Tuesday 8am - 6pm
Wednesday 8am - 6pm
Thursday 8am - 6pm
Friday 8am - 6pm
Saturday 8am - 4pm
Sunday 8am - 1pm
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