World Oyama Karate

World Oyama Karate

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OSU! #SiliconValleyOyamaKarate
Happened to stop in Homewood with the family and walked past your location. Looks very nice.

Jeff Schare
8th Dan
Song Moo Kwan Tae Kwon Do
I would like to congratulate all the competitors in yesterday’s tournament. I was not able to attend but I was there in spirit! A big shout out to all of the winners! I hear everyone did an AWESOME job! Continue training and I hope to see you in the spring! Thank you Saiko Shihan for another great tournament! Osu!
O S U!!!!ALL THE BEST TO SAICO SHIHAN YASHUHICO O Y A M A AND SHOSHU OYAMA FAMILY!!!!O S U!!!!AS HELLAS -ATHENS-LARISSA - KARATE :WE REALLY THANK YOU!!!!!WE NEVER FORGET:S H O S H U AND SAI CO SHIHAN AND WORLD OYAMA KARATE F A M I L Y!!!!!O S U !!!!
Today is Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama's 45th anniversary in Birmingham, AL. We are extremely fortunate to have this great Martial Arts Master and Co-Founder of the World Oyama Karate Organization as our teacher and guide. Thank you, Saiko Shihan, for sharing your wisdom and mastery of karate with us for all these years. We are indeed lucky! OSU!
Osu Sosu Y. Oyama, first I will introduce myself: I'm Henny Ruberg from Holland. I was a student of Shihan Loek Hollander With him I achieved 1st, 2nd and 3rd Dan Kyokushin karate. (3thDan in Papendal Holland) with Sosu S. Oyama, Kaisho T. Nakamura and Hanshi S. Arneil.
Then I start to do Judo and after finishing my 1st Dan Judo, I started preparing for my 4th Dan Karate. So go to my teacher's teacher in this case Seiko Shihan S. Oyama in Connecticut Dojo (Fairfield).
After a month in Fairfield, we moved to the Manhattan Dojo NY.
I've trained total for 10X in the USA under your brother.
I have also visited your dojo 1x. There was a tournament near you. I have many good memories of the lessons of Sosu S. Oyama. Unfortunately he died. I once called him about the situation after 7/11. However, in 2000 I had a stroke which still causes me to be paralyzed me for the half site, so my karate dojo has to sell. Therefore, I am now stoped with all Budo art. Just I do medical fitness and swiming.
After 33 years Karate, 10 years Judo and 5 years Kendo, I am now retired. A big OSU from Holland, Henny Ruberg.
Does anyone know if the dojo in chelsea is still open
Does anyone here know the best way to get in touch with Saiko Shihan? An old friend/student of his passed away recently and I know he would want to know.

http://m.legacy.com/dignity-memorial/obituary-preview.aspx?n=Collie+%22Reggie%22-Ray&lc=4394&pid=185419919&mid=7412012

http://worldoyama.com World Oyama Karate is a classic, full-contact, Japanese style of Karate. In 1965, Mas Oyama, Director of the International Kyokushin Organization, sent his chief instructor, Soshu Shigeru Oyama, from Tokyo international headquarters to New York to spread Kyokushin Karate worldwide.

Operating as usual

10/27/2021
10/26/2021

*** LIMITED number of HARD COPIES Available! ***

Anyone who would like to order a *signed* copy can do so via email: [email protected].

Once we receive your request, we will follow up with an order form and other details.
Price is $26 (+ Shipping & Handling)

OSU! 👊👊👊

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This book chronicles the journey of one of the “original warriors” of Kyokushin Karate—Saiko Shihan Yasuhiko Oyama. At the age of 14, he began training at Mas Oyama’s first dojo in Tokyo, Japan, when it was still a flimsy, tiny one-story shack.

In the subsequent years, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama and his brother, Soshu Shigeru Oyama, played key roles in transforming the Kyokushin Organization from a single dojo to the largest and most popular Karate organization in the world. They split from the organization in 1984 and founded World Oyama Karate.

In his 65+ years of training experience, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama built a reputation as a superb tactician and trained many national and world full-contact Karate champions. This autobiography is an inspirational story of triumphs and setbacks that is sure to motivate anyone who reads it!

*** LIMITED number of HARD COPIES Available! ***

Anyone who would like to order a *signed* copy can do so via email: [email protected].

Once we receive your request, we will follow up with an order form and other details.
Price is $26 (+ Shipping & Handling)

OSU! 👊👊👊

*******************************

This book chronicles the journey of one of the “original warriors” of Kyokushin Karate—Saiko Shihan Yasuhiko Oyama. At the age of 14, he began training at Mas Oyama’s first dojo in Tokyo, Japan, when it was still a flimsy, tiny one-story shack.

In the subsequent years, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama and his brother, Soshu Shigeru Oyama, played key roles in transforming the Kyokushin Organization from a single dojo to the largest and most popular Karate organization in the world. They split from the organization in 1984 and founded World Oyama Karate.

In his 65+ years of training experience, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama built a reputation as a superb tactician and trained many national and world full-contact Karate champions. This autobiography is an inspirational story of triumphs and setbacks that is sure to motivate anyone who reads it!

10/22/2021

*** PRE-ORDERS now Available! ***
We anticipate hard copies of the life story of Soshu Shigeru Oyama to be available the 1st week of December, 2021. A limited number of hard copies will be printed. The cost of the book will be $25 (plus Shipping).

Anyone who would like to reserve a *signed* copy can do so with a $15 deposit. DM us here or via email: [email protected]. Once we receive your request, we will follow up with an order form and other details.

OSU! 👊👊👊

*** PRE-ORDERS now Available! ***
We anticipate hard copies of the life story of Soshu Shigeru Oyama to be available the 1st week of December, 2021. A limited number of hard copies will be printed. The cost of the book will be $25 (plus Shipping).

Anyone who would like to reserve a *signed* copy can do so with a $15 deposit. DM us here or via email: [email protected]. Once we receive your request, we will follow up with an order form and other details.

OSU! 👊👊👊

10/19/2021

*** COMING SOON! ***
The life story of Soshu Shigeru Oyama will be coming out soon! A limited number of hard copies will be printed, and it will also be available as an eBook on Amazon! OSU! 👊👊👊

*** COMING SOON! ***
The life story of Soshu Shigeru Oyama will be coming out soon! A limited number of hard copies will be printed, and it will also be available as an eBook on Amazon! OSU! 👊👊👊

10/08/2021

OSU! Two big stars of the next generation of World Oyama Karate and I are working hard on producing the online training academy! This is a quick preview... more is coming soon!
OSU!
--Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama

World Oyama Karate--Official Online Training - YouTube 09/10/2021

World Oyama Karate--Official Online Training - YouTube

*** UPDATE ***
The Official Oyama Karate YouTube Channel has moved--please re-subscribe with the link below 👇👇👇👇👇 OSU!

World Oyama Karate--Official Online Training - YouTube This is the NEW (updated) official channel of the World Oyama Karate Organization

Photos from World Oyama Karate's post 09/09/2021

*** New Weapons Training Video Series Coming Soon to WOK YouTube channel! ***

08/23/2021

Vintage video of Soshu, Saiko Shihan and Shihan Miura bringing their fighters down to Birmingham, AL for a special training camp in Feb. 1991.

OSU!

08/04/2021

You're never too old to start training! Karate is for every age! Here is a vintage news story from World Oyama Karate in Homewood, AL from 1988! OSU!

Chasing the American Dream 07/23/2021

Chasing the American Dream

***** Saiko Shihan’s biography now available for download at Amazon! *****

Chasing the American Dream Chasing the American Dream

07/19/2021

World Oyama Karate Founder and Director, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama explains and demonstrates how to make a strong fist.

WOK Demo_Soshu vs Sword 07/13/2021

WOK Demo_Soshu vs Sword

Soshu’s legendary sword demonstration with Shihan Miura!

WOK Demo_Soshu vs Sword Soshu S. Oyama vs. Shihan M. Miura (Sword)

07/12/2021

*** BREAKING NEWS ***

Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama's autobiography is now available as an eBook on Amazon! Use the link below to download a copy! OSU!

*********👊********

This book chronicles the journey of one of the “original warriors” of Kyokushin Karate—Saiko Shihan Yasuhiko Oyama. At the age of 14, he began training at Mas Oyama’s first dojo in Tokyo, Japan, when it was still a flimsy, tiny one-story shack. In the subsequent years, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama and his brother, Soshu Shigeru Oyama, played key roles in transforming the Kyokushin Organization from a single dojo to the largest and most popular Karate organization in the world. They split from the organization in 1984 and founded World Oyama Karate. In his 65+ years of training experience, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama built a reputation as a superb tactician and trained many national and world full-contact Karate champions. This autobiography is an inspirational story of triumphs and setbacks that is sure to motivate anyone who reads it!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0996VNKMN/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=yasuhiko+oyama&qid=1626118360&sr=8-4

*** BREAKING NEWS ***

Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama's autobiography is now available as an eBook on Amazon! Use the link below to download a copy! OSU!

*********👊********

This book chronicles the journey of one of the “original warriors” of Kyokushin Karate—Saiko Shihan Yasuhiko Oyama. At the age of 14, he began training at Mas Oyama’s first dojo in Tokyo, Japan, when it was still a flimsy, tiny one-story shack. In the subsequent years, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama and his brother, Soshu Shigeru Oyama, played key roles in transforming the Kyokushin Organization from a single dojo to the largest and most popular Karate organization in the world. They split from the organization in 1984 and founded World Oyama Karate. In his 65+ years of training experience, Saiko Shihan Y. Oyama built a reputation as a superb tactician and trained many national and world full-contact Karate champions. This autobiography is an inspirational story of triumphs and setbacks that is sure to motivate anyone who reads it!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0996VNKMN/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=yasuhiko+oyama&qid=1626118360&sr=8-4

07/10/2021

Seichou Karate Richard Romero FALSELY CLAIMS “121 Thoughts” came from Shigeru Oyama. I am Tetsumori Oyama, Soshu Shigeru Oyama’s son.

My assertions about the book and the thoughts and statements Richard Romero attributes to my late father are entirely biased. Richard Romero, the author of the book, and I had known each other since childhood. So I am familiar with his background and many of his experiences.

“121 Thoughts on My Life in Karatedo” has very few elements truly attributable to my father. Instead, the book is primarily a platform for Richard Romero of Seichou karate, with my deceased father, Shigeru Oyama, as the vehicle to express and validate Richard Romero’s thoughts and opinions on karate. And to highlight Richard Romero’s experiences and to showcase Richard Romero’s achievements. It is self-congratulatory. It is self-serving.

(About a 15-minute read)

I put in parenthesis a part of the title, so you understand that this book is Mr. Romero’s interpretation and translation of what my father purportedly told him. “121 Thoughts on My Life in Karatedo by Shigeru Oyama (as told to Richard Romero).”

Soshu spoke in broken English or Japanese for those who do not know, but the book is in plain English. So it was not written by rote, but rather Richard Romero’s interpretation and translation of what my father purportedly “told to Richard Romero.”

When Mr. Romero first called to tell me about the book, he said that he had interviewed my father every Tuesday over the phone. Mr. Romero also told me that he recorded the interviews, and it was from these recordings, he wrote my late father’s thoughts.

While my father was still alive, he and his third wife had confirmed with me these discussions and recordings with Mr. Romero, the interviewer, and my father, the interviewee.

Bear in mind; with the exception of one social gathering, it was after 26 years of absence from my father’s life and the World Oyama Karate Organization that Mr. Romero approached my father to write the book. He came to my father in the hospital while my father was recovering from his second open-heart surgery.

Before I began speaking out publicly against the book, I tried to reach Mr. Romero for six months. I repeatedly asked Mr. Romero to meet with me to discuss the thoughts, statements, and other elements in the book that he attributed to my late father. Since most of the book sounded nothing like him, I wanted to hear the unedited recordings of the interviews, to listen to my father’s voice and words articulated in the context that Mr. Romero interpreted and translated them.

As of this posting, I have not heard back from the author, Richard Romero. It is a shame because I would much rather have had a private face-to-face conversation like two gentlemen.

Mr. Romero claims that my father, Soshu, repeatedly referred to examples of a “young man/boy/teacher” and that Soshu used this “young person’s” experiences as exemplary examples of life and karatedo.

I had heard these stories before, but disturbingly, they were first told to me by Richard Romero from his own experiences. The “young person’s” experiences purportedly described by Soshu sound very much to be about Richard Romero and often begin with “In this connection.”

Below are some examples. My comments about these anecdotal lessons are under TETSUMORI OYAMA.

Pg. 90-91 PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
In this connection, in late 1984 one of my students, who had competed that year in the Kyokushinkai-kan All World Karate Championship in Tokyo, came to my office to discuss his future. He had trained with me since he was a child…

…Then, after your professional career is set, you should find a way to share your knowledge and experience with others. You could be a great teacher.

The young man took my advice and finished his education. In fact, he went on to become a lawyer and had a good career in that field. However, during that time he started his own dojo, which became a great success. Eventually, he stopped practicing law because he enjoyed karatedo much more. Now, he teaches karatedo full time and could not be happier.

Ultimately, in order for this young man to fulfill his dream of making karatedo his life, he had to break the habit of his first decade of karate practice, which was to think exclusively about his own development. By refocusing his considerable abilities on the development of his students and his dojo, he has been able to help others to achieve the great personal satisfaction and growth that he enjoyed as a child at my dojo, and he has built a great business for himself.

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
You just read Richard Romero’s résumé, presented anecdotally as THOUGHT 53, which the author, Richard Romero, claims to have come from Soshu.

The 1984 tournament purportedly cited by Soshu is the same tournament on Richard Romero’s Seichou Karate website. See below. (All the excerpts from Mr. Romero’s Seichou karate website are as of this posting):

- “During that time, Romero represented the U.S. in Tokyo at the Kyokushinkai-kan World Championship (1984).”

- “…he is an attorney admitted in New York and Washington, D.C.”

- “In 1997 Romero founded Seichou Karate in Alexandria, Virginia”

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
The 1984 tournament is also in the book’s prologue as one of Richard Romero’s credentials. He is also the only one from my father’s 1984 team to get a law degree.

So in this example, we know the “young man” is Richard Romero, the book’s author.

Friends. Would you please think about this for a moment?

The book’s author, Richard Romero, claims that Soshu “told to Richard Romero” all about Richard Romero’s “considerable abilities” and highlighted Richard Romero’s achievements. Then Richard Romero interpreted and translated it for the book to present to the world as one of Soshu’s most essential thoughts based on Soshu’s “life in karatedo.”

Please let that sink in for a moment because there is a recurring theme, where Soshu purportedly refers to a “young person’s” experiences to give us lessons on life and karatedo. As mentioned, I first heard these stories from Richard Romero - from his own experiences. The only difference in the book is that the “young person” is always portrayed in an overly flattering way. He is aggrandized purportedly by Soshu.

For example, Mr. Romero told me about a tournament he competed in when he was a young boy. He had gotten knocked out cold from a back spinning kick to his head. Now, a nearly identical story is purportedly coming from my father, but with great admiration for the “young boy.” From THOUGHT 83:

Pg. 135 PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
- I remember many years ago a young student of mine got knocked out cold in a tournament…
- …he took a powerful back spinning kick to the head…
- …he did not quit. Rather, he continued training and growing…
- That young boy exemplifies the old adage that one who falls off a horse should get right back on. That’s precisely what he did and he eventually became an accomplished knockdown fighter!

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
So Mr. Romero claims that my father showered praise onto the “young boy” to let the world know that the “young boy” “eventually became an accomplished knockdown fighter!”

Is it just a coincidence that Soshu “told” Mr. Romero a near-identical experience to what Mr. Romero went through, with added praise?

Below is another example of a lesson that purportedly came from my father. And again, it happens to be another incident that Mr. Romero himself experienced and told me. Right down to the passing of his karate dojo business card. THOUGHT 73:

Pg. 116 PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
- In this connection, last year, one of my instructors came to me to discuss an incident that was troubling him.
- …the instructor lost his temper, got out of his car, passed the motorist his karatedojo business card and screamed that if the motorist were man enough to get out of his car…
- …had his students observed the altercation, it would have been a good example to them of when it is appropriate to stand up for one’s self
- Every great karateka I have known has had this kind of experience

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
It seems an astonishing coincidence that another incident that sounds identical to what Mr. Romero experienced made it into the book. And the instructor is apparently a “great karateka.”

Another example. Back in the mid-1980s, there was a heated argument between Mr. Romero and my father, and Mr. Romero was expelled from the dojo temporarily. I was told about this incident shortly after it occurred by both my father and Mr. Romero.

There is a very similar disagreement in the book between my father and a “young teacher.” The experience itself is too long to quote, but what is interesting to note is that there is an apology to the “young teacher” that purportedly came from my father.

Keep in mind that this was the first of two major disputes between them. The second was in 1992 when Mr. Romero was asked to leave World Oyama Karate (more on this later). From THOUGHT 71:

Pg. 115 PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
- I regret my behavior in this situation because I had taught him since he was a young child…
- I apologized to the young teacher…
- This was only one of many mistakes I made in my career. Yet, that experience made me a better instructor and leader because I recognized and corrected my error.

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
So, according to Mr. Romero’s interpretation of what Soshu purportedly “told” him, Soshu was wrong, and the “young teacher” was right.

I find it quite intriguing that out of all my father’s mistakes in life, this is the only one cited and admitted to in the book, purportedly by my father, with an apology to the “young teacher,” no less.

It seems a fantastic coincidence that these stories are nearly identical to what Mr. Romero experienced and told me. And, the addition of glowing praise for the “young person” makes these stories not only uncomfortable but disturbing to read.

It begs the question. For whom is the book for, Soshu or Richard Romero?

In addition to the aggrandizement of the “young person,” and equally disturbing, is what appears very much to be Mr. Romero projecting his personal opinions and sentiment onto my father. And please take note of the last excerpt. From THOUGHT 102:

Pg. 165 PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
- Since the death of Emperor Hirohito in 1989, the Japanese public education system…
- However, two characteristics of Japanese education seem not to have changed…
- First, Japanese public schools excel at raising the mien level of groups of students…
- I have been fascinated by these facets of Japanese public education and they have informed my teaching over the last fifty years…

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
According to Mr. Romero, my father purportedly went on and on about the Japanese public education system, which is complete nonsense. My father spent over six decades immersed in the martial arts world. He moved to the U.S. permanently in 1966 and only went back to Japan a few days at a time to teach and conduct business for karate. He had nothing whatsoever to do with Japan’s public educational system.

Mr. Romero, however, has first-hand experience and intimate knowledge of this subject. Again, from his Seichou karate website:

- “In June of 1988 Romero entered Cornell University’s Full-year Asian Language Concentration Program in Japanese (“FALCON”). He graduated from FALCON in June 1989 and moved to Japan to work in the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program (“JET”).”

- “Richard Romero is a Japanologist”

- “…he has five years of other professional teaching experience in Japan, including Public Educational Consultant at the Kani City Board of Education…”

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
So, you have Soshu, who spent over six decades in the martial arts world teaching only karate and offering in his dojo only karate.

Then you have Richard Romero, a “Japanologist” who worked as a “Public Educational Consultant at the Kani City Board of Education.”

And who also, according to his Seichou Karate Dojo website, offers in addition to karate, Japanese cultural curriculum taught in the Japanese public education system, e.g., “Japanese Calligraphy (called “shodo” in Japanese),” and “Japanese Abacus (Nippon Soroban).”

Friends. Please. Whom would you say is the more likely of the two to have had their teaching influenced by the “facets of Japanese public education,” Soshu or Richard Romero?

Of course, I would say Richard Romero. Not only for the reasons listed above - but also because I never in my life, at home or in the dojo, ever heard my father lecture on Japan’s public education system.

And neither had any of the dozens and dozens of karateka and uchi-deshi that I have spoken with recently. All of whom trained under Soshu and had known him for decades.

Another example from THOUGHT 15:

Pg. 37 PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
- Naturally, karateka gave the public what it wanted and breaking pine shelving became a “must do” element of karatedo…
- Great, right? Wrong! You see, this was a completely environmentally unfriendly use of wood. In fact, by breaking all of that wood, karateka - myself included - probably helped deforest large swaths of North America!
- I recommend that karateka use re-breakable boards because they are environmentally friendly, cost effective and convenient.

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
First, my father purportedly recommending the use of re-breakable boards is simply trite in the context of a man with my father’s background and history. Second, it is not sarcasm to say that it is almost as corny as my father purportedly explaining how to field a phone call. I question if Mr. Romero is mistaking it for one of the scripts they give you at a business seminar (pg. 140) — or getting together at the end of the calendar year for scheduling events (pg. 79). Do we really need Soshu to explain this?

There are many more examples, often reading like a behavior and etiquette handbook, but here is my point. So many of these topics are common sense and common knowledge in the martial arts world. And for Mr. Romero to claim these ideas to be among my father’s most important thoughts and philosophies in his 60-plus years in karate — is utterly absurd and trite.

Sadly, and more to my point, there is no lesson to be learned from or even a single mention of the world-famous Kyokushin fighters and great karateka Sosai Mas Oyama sent to train with my father. And many other champion Kyokushin fighters who, on their own, traveled overseas to train with him.

My father was most well known and took great pride in contributing to the development of the Kyokushin fighters and the Kyokushin Organization. Many of these world-renowned Kyokushin fighters went on to become leaders of their own organizations. But there is no mention nor a single lesson to be gleaned from them.

Instead, we get such things as how to field a phone call and scheduling events. And what to wear under your gi for outdoor cold-weather training. And the showcasing of Mr. Romero’s resume. And life lessons from a “young person’s” experiences that seem very much to be about Mr. Romero (more examples of the “young person” at the end).

Please forgive me, but I must digress further. THE FRONT FOOT POINTING STRAIGHT IN A FORWARD-LEANING STANCE IS NOT FOR PROTECTING OUR FRONT LEG FROM A LOW ROUNDHOUSE KICK. NOR IS IT TO USE OUR HIPS TO KICK, AS MR. ROMERO FALSELY CLAIMS TO HAVE COME FROM MY FATHER (pg. 62).

My uncle and father had written volumes with detailed explanations of basics to advanced karate techniques, complete with photos, illustrations, and diagrams.

Had Mr. Romero read any of these textbooks, he would have known a forward-leaning stance is not for that purpose (not according to my father and uncle), and a couple of these books even include the “minutiae” of punching. Perhaps Mr. Romero is unaware of the textbooks.

Now back to re-breakable boards. IF MR. ROMERO HAD ASKED MY FATHER if he thought it was a good idea to use synthetic boards because it would help save some trees; he might have agreed with him.

BUT, Soshu never practiced nor preached their use. He never had me practice on them nor any of the dozens and dozens of karateka and uchi-deshi that I have spoken with recently. All of whom trained under Soshu and had known him for decades.

I am not suggesting that it is not a good practice or not a worthy cause. And, I do not doubt the amount of wood Soshu and his peers had broken over the years. But, he was never an environmentalist, so to portray him as such is a mischaracterization.

I suspect using re-breakable boards and helping to save the environment is a practice and a near and dear cause for Mr. Romero.

AND, whether my father spoke in Japanese or broken English, it would have been entirely unnatural and out of character for him to use idioms like “Great, right? Wrong!” (Pg. 37). Or “there was a new sheriff in town and that sheriff was named Oyama” (pg. 22). Or my father quoting Shakespeare “the truth will out” (pg. 82).

It is as if Mr. Romero had complete disregard for capturing my father’s personality and charisma. There is a severe disconnect like the following statement that ends the chapter:

Pg. 37 PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
Bear in mind that if karateka are unwilling to modify their habits in a minor way, such as use of synthetic boards, it is unlikely that they will ever be able to adapt on more profound issues of practice or philosophy.

TETSUMORI OYAMA:
Would you please read again the statement above? Does that not sound like someone who is full of himself and takes himself much too seriously?

Friends. THAT IS NOT MY FATHER. Those who knew my father and spent any meaningful time with him would know this.

Of course, he had his opinions, but self-righteousness and an attitude of moral superiority were not in his character.

Attributing pompous statements to my deceased father is offensive and highly disrespectful. It is another example of the grossly inaccurate portrayal of my late father by Richard Romero of Seichou karate.

An arrogance permeates the book, and it is most egregious and hypocritical in the chapter on MMA - Mixed Martial Arts (pg. 39). Littered throughout the chapter are sanctimonious comments that sound like someone envious and threatened by the popularity of MMA (pg. 39). (Another mischaracterization of Soshu.) It is what first compelled me to speak out against the book. The following link is my first post showing the inconsistencies of Mr. Romero’s claim that these statements came from my father:
SoshuShigeruOyamaBOOK/MMA

And finally, I must re-address the highly misleading statements in the prologue. These statements purportedly came from Soshu’s third wife, which I addressed in my previous post: SoshuShigeruOyamaBOOK/Kyokushin. Nevertheless, they are worth repeating because they set up the book’s tone as Mr. Romero’s credentials.

First) It states that Mr. Romero “had a 45-year relationship” with Soshu, during which he “was present at many important junctures in his career.” Mr. Romero himself also alludes to this “45-year relationship” in one of his “Romero’s take” (pg. 179).

The problem with this claim is that by all accounts from dozens and dozens of karateka, uchi-deshi, and myself, Mr. Romero was absent from Soshu’s life and the World Oyama Karate Organization for 26 of those 45 years. No senior karateka under Soshu can recall seeing Mr. Romero at any of the World Oyama Karate events, e.g., promotion tests, clinics, tournaments, beach training, and camps since 1989. The year Mr. Romero moved to Japan to work for Japan’s public education system. (However, Mr. Romero did show up at a tournament dedicated to my deceased father where he promoted the book.)

Second) It states that “Soshu chose” Mr. Romero “as his first American uchi-deshi.”

The problem here is that RICHARD ROMERO WAS NEVER AN UCHI-DESHI UNDER SOSHU SHIGERU OYAMA. He taught the morning classes for my father then went to school to study law. The real uchi-deshi trained, cleaned, cooked, and worked in the dojo — all day — every day. Soshu’s uchi-deshi, instructors, and many of his students, and I know this.

Third) It states that “Soshu chose” Mr. Romero to teach his correspondence students in Japan as Soshu’s “personal representative.”

The problem with this statement is that Mr. Romero began teaching karate in Japan under the World Oyama Karate name - without authorization. As a result of the lack of approval, a disagreement ensued, where Mr. Romero was asked to leave World Oyama Karate. This took place in Japan in 1992. Soshu did not “chose” Mr. Romero as his “personal representative.”

Regardless of who these statements purportedly came from, Richard Romero approached Soshu to write the book.
Richard Romero completed the book after Soshu’s death.
Richard Romero authored, published, and copyrighted the book.
Therefore, Richard Romero is accountable for the content of the book.

When you put it all together, my previous posts along with this one, you cannot help but ask, for whom is the book really for, Soshu or Richard Romero?

I assert “121 Thoughts on My Life in Karatedo” has very few elements truly attributable to my father. Instead, the book is primarily a platform for Richard Romero of Seichou karate, with my deceased father, Shigeru Oyama, as the vehicle to express and validate Richard Romero’s thoughts and opinions on karate. And to highlight Richard Romero’s experiences and to showcase Richard Romero’s achievements. It is self-congratulatory. It is self-serving.

Mr. Romero also uses a page under my father’s name and image that is often mistaken for the ones hosted by the Oyama family.

There are 3 pages for Soshu. The 2 hosted by the Oyama family are “Soshu Shigeru Oyama Tribute” and “Soshu Shigeru Oyama Book.”

Mr. Romero uses the “Soshu Shigeru Oyama” page to promote his book and promote and brand himself and his dojo under my father’s name and image. As if he represents my deceased father — this, too, is self-serving and distasteful — it is a plea for relevance.

My father is unrecognizable to me in this book, and it is profoundly disturbing on multiple levels. But first and foremost, it does a great disservice to the memory of my father, Soshu Shigeru Oyama.

Osu,
Tetsumori Oyama

PS. At this point, I am doubtful. Still, if Mr. Romero ever honors my request, I am interested in hearing the following recordings (unedited), in addition to the excerpts above. The list is by no means comprehensive:

Pg. 68 THOUGHT 36 - PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
- In this connection, I remember that in 1980 one of my instructors was in his first year of law school. One day I asked him what he was learning…
Pg. 169 THOUGHT 104 - PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
- Many years ago I had a student who had finished law school and was preparing to take his bar examination.
- The bar exam can be terrifying to young men and women but, through the lens of his karatedo tournament experience my student was able to put the bar exam into the proper perspective and was unafraid.
Pg. 86 THOUGHT 51 - PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
- In this connection, a senior student of mine once told me that, in order to improve his Japanese language skills while he was living in Japan…
Pg. 79 THOUGHT 46 Fraternity
Pg. 139 THOUGHT 86 Karatedo In The Olympics
Pg. 39 THOUGHT 17 chapter on MMA - Mixed Martial Arts
Pg. 48 THOUGHT 21 Missed Opportunity
Pg. 93 THOUGHT 53 Titles
Pg. 151 THOUGHT 93 Training Equipment
Pg. 125 THOUGHT 79 Japan is Changing
Pg. 142 THOUGHT 89 Bushido
Pg. 96 THOUGHT 58 Meditation

Pg. 82 PURPORTEDLY FROM SOSHU:
In The Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare said “the truth will out,” and this is most certainly the case…

To visit the official Soshu Shigeru Oyama TRIBUTE page hosted by the Oyama family, please go here:
https://www.facebook.com/SoshuShigeruOyamaTribute

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