Heaven and Earth Aikido

Heaven and Earth Aikido

Comments

Great Class, good reading. Thanks Sensei Anthony Breda
Sorry Ethan and I missed out today. Paige, we owe you one!
I realized that I will be in Spain when Harvey Sensei is visiting. Like a bad penny, however, I will keep showing up here and there.
Missing my Heaven and Earth brothers and sisters.....:(
It doesn't look like I'll be able to make it up for your Mountain Training, but I wanted to wish you the best. Hopefully I can make it to the next one. I thought I'd share this short video about "Mountain Training" in my place.
Great Kids doing Great things.

Great Kids doing Great things!

Excellent instructors and aikido training!
All, I am sharing this in support of one of my dojo mates and his fight. It was started by one of his high school friends.

Please see below.

—————————————-

I’m sending this link to all of you, asking for help to raise money for my Light the Night Team! This walk is to support and raise money that helps to fund individuals and families who suffer from Lymphoma and Leukemia.
I’d like to share a little bit about my team. Team Bryan! Bryan Harrison and I met the first few weeks of my freshmen year at Centreville High School back in 1999. Bryan and I became fast friends and I sort of became the sister he never had, while he became a wonderful addition to my ever growing “family”! We saw each other through a lot of silly, young adult trials and tribulations. And while we both went on to live our own adult lives, we never lost touch! In March of 2017, exactly one day after Bryan’s 33rd Birthday, he was diagnosed and hospitalized for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Bryan began a fight that no one ever expects to have in their lifetime and it continues to this very day. After two stem cell transplants, endless chemotherapy and almost a year away from home for the best medical care he was able to find for his unique situation. Bryan is back at home with his beautiful wife Zaya and adorable dog Baxter! Although he is feeling much better and his spirit has never once wavered, the fight still continues everyday to prevent relapse.
So...Now comes the time I ask you to please open your hearts and your wallets and donate to the link below, so that we may raise as much money, awareness and support for every single person who has a family member or friend fighting for their life everyday!
Vivian and I will be proudly carrying our lanterns with Team Bryan on October 20, 2018 in D.C. on the National Mall! Thank you for taking the time to read this email and show your support!

http://pages.lightthenight.org/nca/WashDC18/RTancredi

Love and Regards,
Rachel & Vivian Tancredi

P.S. Please feel free to forward this link to anyone you feel may want to join the fight!

https://pages.lightthenight.org/nca/WashDC18/RTancredi
I miss my Aikido family....
Posting this per Brian's request. . . . :)

Sensei Blue Spruell, Chief Instructor @ Peachtree Aikikai Atlanta, is teaching Iaido and Aikido at Raleigh Aikikai this weekend-- Friday and Saturday, December 1-2.

William and I will be there. It's a pretty easy drive.

A traditional Aikido dojo practicing O'Sensei's art of peace through the lineage of Yamada Sensei and Sugano Sensei. Non-Discrimination Policy: Heaven and Earth Aikido Center, Inc admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school.

Operating as usual

[09/22/21]   Filling in for Pete sensei tonight, another great class! We worked almost exclusively on Ikkyo Omote and Ura. It was a big class tonight but I manage to train with everyone and I have to say I learned a lot. When I’m training with the children I will often work from a hanmi handachi position to sort of level the playing field. I am getting close to my pre-Covid proficiency with mobility from shikyo and hanmi handachi.

I am also learning not to talk so much, not to overload them or assume they won’t understand. This shift from teaching mostly adults to teaching mostly children hasn’t been the issue I was so worried about. I find myself training joyfully at the lower end of the dojo with the children and then in the same class training with several adults in a more Martial fashion, switching back-and-forth with relative ease.

Anyway good class!

09/18/2021

A great morning at the dojo! We had quite a full mat And we had Ericksen Sensei in the house teaching second class which in and of itself was a special event! This was immediately followed by Greg and Jonas with an excellent performance on their third and first kyu exam! Exceptionally fun to watch! Thank you Tammy Bowcut and Pete Wilson Senseis for working so hard to get these two ready to perform so very well.

A great morning at the dojo! We had quite a full mat And we had Ericksen Sensei in the house teaching second class which in and of itself was a special event! This was immediately followed by Greg and Jonas with an excellent performance on their third and first kyu exam! Exceptionally fun to watch! Thank you Tammy Bowcut and Pete Wilson Senseis for working so hard to get these two ready to perform so very well.

[09/11/21]   GREAT morning at the dojo! First class packed withnew members Peter, Alice, James, Chris, Yalda and Hana! It was great to welcome back our friend Bradly as well. our discussion with the youngsters after first class regarding 9/11 was very enlightening.

Greag showed us that he is in top shape for his test next week and Kayden and Navaal are really beginning to embrace weapons training in the second class. Have a great weekend everyone.

09/10/2021

Breakfalls in Canada are the same here.

[09/05/21]   I attended an amazing seminar at Aikido in Fredericksburg this weekend. People from at least 6 different styles trained together as Miles Kessler Sensei led us through an indepth look at connection and flow. We did techniques, and yet what I found was joy and freedom to express my aikido. We worked on center and movement, and what I found was acceptance and peace. I will do my best to share what I learned next Saturday in class, and many classes to come I hope.

Update:
Was thinking more about how amazing it is to connect in this way with people after a long time without physical touch. I can say for me, while connection can happen without touch, so much more comes through when two people plug in, or click, together. Such a good day.

See you on the mat...~ Tammy Bowcutt

Miles Kessler

08/26/2021

[08/26/21]   In honor of the upcoming memorial for Sugano Sensei, Heaven and Earth is reposting this recollection of a conversation with Sensei.

"The Philosophy of Aikido is Love"

(These notes were taken at the 2007 Global Inner Aikido Seminar (GIAS) in Belgium. I accompanied Sugano Sensei as Otomo to Belgium for his Global Inner Aikido Seminar (GIAS) in 2007.)

BE: Why do you do Aikido Sensei?

SS: Doing Aikido too long! (Laughs) What else would I do? (Smiling) Do Aikido purely for fascination. Always learning. Always growing and seeing new things. Layer on layer. Like polishing a mirror or making sword.

When I start Aikido I was a boy, very fascinated technically with Aikido. Same as when study Judo and fascinated. Over time different. It takes time to understand.

Was one of the first Japanese teachers to teach overseas. (As such) I have responsibility to represent Aikido. Have serious responsibility to represent Aikido as O Sensei gave it. New generation not perhaps represent O Sensei. This is OK but means Aikido different and loses essence. It is important not just to use Aikido for person’s ideas. Must go on a search for meaning and application in philosophy and technique. Cannot go other way. Must let person come out through Aikido and not make Aikido through person. To teach must always be learning something new. Each class for me I am learning. Always fascinating. Cannot just show Aikido. Must see how student respond to Aikido and adjust. Must see response of student and this continues my fascination and learning.

Philosophy of Aikido is love, compassion, affection. Many process to achieve. Those concepts are universal and not just Japanese concept. Aikido has these as it philosophy, its center. To tell is OK but have to act. This is why we (Dojo’s that follow Sugano Sensei) support children. If you train you must give yourself. So it is with life. We must help others around. O Sensei was spiritual and for him Aikido was spiritual not martial. O Sensei pursue martial art before spiritual. If you study both there is contradiction. But you must study both. Martial and philosophy and in time there is understanding. If you go into detail on O Sensei’s idea of love, compassion is different than others. Idea of love very wide and was given for all creation.

O Sensei never said, “You must do this in order to find something” about his spirituality. O Sensei achieved these things through his religion, through connection to God. He never asked anyone to follow his religion so it is up to us to find his meaning. His relationship was personal to God and he not ask others for this but let them decide on their relationship, their path. That is very much Aikido way of philosophy. You give information and individual person decide to believe. It is an open door but the way is closed. Each must decide, each find. It is up to us to find way to achieve the philosophy. O Sensei followed his religion to his philosophy. He went to shrine and prayed to his God but he never said that we should do this.

In terms of technique is the same way. I give technique but you choose to follow or not. I give information. You decide and act. Way you train is a function of what you believe. This applies to the practice and to the philosophy. Practice of Aikido gives physical expertise. If you do not have study behind you, you cannot explain or act properly. This is perhaps some difference between my generation and now or non-Japanese. We practice from childhood. In Japan everything about studying for job. Martial understanding has been lost. There and here 99% of people come for recreation. If you want more you must study. In the olden days there was teacher student relationship of smaller scale. As more popular the teacher, student relationship was lost. Teacher, student relationship is more healthy. But this is difficult now. Organization and politics get in way of pure student, teacher relationship.”

08/25/2021

In honor of the upcoming memorial for Sugano Sensei, Heaven and Earth is reposting this piece on Sensei from 2017.

Why Sugano Sensei was Special.

On August 29th, 2010 Sensei Seiichi Sugano passed into another existence. I am Yamada Sensei’s inner student, forever grateful to him having taken me as Uchideshi but I was also close to Sugano Sensei. He was and remains the living embodiment of Aikido. In the early morning hours, unable to sleep on the 6th anniversary of his passing, I tried to define some of the reasons he is so revered by so many who studied with him. Since his passing I have struggled to define Sensei to students but have always come up short. There was so much there, where does one begin? When I try it usually just comes out as, “He was great”. I have heard the same from others who studied with him when they try. Its like there is too much to say. Here is my attempt to explain the truth of Sensei’s greatness.

Untouchable. His Aikido was different than all other Aikido I have experienced. There was some ineffable quality to it. It was very difficult to see what he was doing with his movement though he was such a large man. Something one had trouble putting a finger on. One reason was that when you attacked him he had the quality that many people ascribed to O’Sensei- he seemed to disappear. When he reappeared it… wow. Sensei Donovan Waite described it once as, “You attack and suddenly there’s nothing, like you fell in a hole and as you are climbing out… a tank drives over you.” Jim Soviero was sent by his teacher the late great Sensei Rick Stickles specifically to study from Sugano Sensei. “I don’t get that stuff Sugano’s doing over there.” Very, very hard to see, even after much training.

Joy. His classes filled a person with energy, made people happy, joyful for being there, for being alive. He was always laughing. He had a joy to him most of the time, even when he would stand over someone on Iriminage and holding their head, imitate bringing it to the mat and say, “Now Crush Head!!!” He would say these words with such a humor and incongruous joy that the entire class would burst out laughing.

Continue. His Aikido, his understanding, was always changing, always new and progressing. He might do something in a class that might never be repeated. He was supposed to write a book for many years and when I asked him he shrugged. “How to write something? Day to day understanding changing.” In an art that is said to be traditional Sensei would always stress the revolutionary nature of Aikido was in its not being fixed but an evolution on the past and something that while remembering the past, is about change and innovation. He talked about learning things outside of Aikido so that one would have additional points to understand the art, that sometimes the best way to see Aikido is to step outside of it at times. He took up western fencing in his 40’s, becoming an Olympic level competitor late in his life. These understandings contributed to his Aikido understandings. At times I and others would ask him about something he had said, particularly important points at times, and he would deny he had ever said such a thing. In reflecting on the strangeness of this recently I realized that this was perhaps his way of not being pinned to ideas he had moved past. He said to be always learning, always seeking. Sensei Jim Soviero, another who was close to him, taught at my school last Memorial said, Sensei would say one should “continue, continue” in their progress.

Amazing physicality. In a driving snow blizzard, using his bare hands on brick, Sensei somehow climbed through the second story window of New York Aikikai. Once Uchideshi’s like myself would climb the wall when we were locked out but to prevent the danger of break ins the building front was professionally machined to remove all hand holds. I tried climbing it after and almost fell, having to be rescued. That was during the day, in the summer and I was in my 20’s, highly athletic and had some experience mountain climbing. Sensei did this at night, in a snow storm so thick a person could not see their hand in front of them and Sensei was almost 60. Had I not seen him I would not have believed it was possible. I was writing at the front desk, heard something at the window and was surprised to see Sensei’s bear like paw coming through the window. I helped pull him in and amazed I asked him what he was doing. He said it was Sunday and night and he didn’t want to bother anyone for something he left at the dojo. This also speaks to the man’s humility as well. He did not want to disturb we who were there to serve him on our small time off. So he climbed a sheer wall in a blizzard with his bare hands. These years later I can only shake my head in wonder at the quality of the man…

Once I was in a rush to do something in the dojo and I ran to be back as fast as I could. I however missed seeing that Sensei had come into the dojo early to work out on his own and was getting changed. I sprinted through the flimsy curtain in the back and hit Sensei at a dead run. The next thing I was laying on the ground with the wind knocked out of me. An antique safe was left in the dojo weighing several hundred pounds and I thought for a second that someone had moved it in back of the curtain, till my head cleared and I saw Sensei standing over me laughing. It was really like I ran into something immovable, a brick wall or something.

Surprise. Sensei always had an ability to surprise. In class and with everything. David Reinfeld told me an story of how he brought a picture into the dojo he showed to several people. (David, if I have any of this wrong please tell me and I will correct.) It was a sophisticated version of the old pictures that are done with things or people hidden in them. David is a trained artist, a professional photographer who makes his living by observation. Despite this he was only able to pick out 10 or so of the 15 things hidden in the picture. Most people were only able to get less than that. David showed the picture to Sensei. He immediately picked out all 15 or so of the hidden figures. Startled, David asked him how he did that. Sensei said that it was simple. One merely had to “soften” the focus eyes like one does when in multiple attack. Then one can see everything, even what is hidden. David said it changed the way he critically observed things. He had surprising ways of explaining the art. The answer given was almost never the one expected. An example was how he described holding a person in a technique. He said it was like catching a fish with bare hands in a stream. One had to be sudden and direct to catch the fish, but soft yet firm or too much strength and the fish would jump from ones hand.

A Better World. O’Sensei talked about Aikido making the world a better place. Sugano Sensei explained how to do that. He talked about the contradiction of the practice and the ideals of Aikido and the remedy. “The idea of Aikido is about harmony and working with others. The practice makes people stronger than others who don’t. The ego becomes larger as they can do things to others with less practice cannot do. This is not real skill though. The practice is by established rules. This is false ego.” “How does someone go beyond the practice, past the ego and get to the philosophy?” “It must be by making the practice real. It must be by action which has a connection to the words the philosophy. If Aikido is about love, one must be loving- in actions and not words. If Aikido is about giving, one must give. This is why at some of my schools I have asked them to raise money for children who don’t have. This is real action and its helps to make the practice real. It makes the words more than just talking.” One must act on the ideals of Aikido in order to make one kind, generous, loving through the practice. As we improve our practice, we improve ourselves and a better world is made.

A Hero. Sensei had his leg amputated in 2003. I was in Kuwait about to go into the Iraq war when I heard. I was told that he was dying. One of the Uchideshi’s gave me Sensei’s private room number at the hospital. I called, not caring about the time, desperate to leave a message for him as we were preparing to go north into the war. To my surprise he picked up the phone only recently come from surgery. I said to him I was so sorry that he had lost his leg. He laughed in his great bear laugh. “Something good! New challenge!” He said that life is change and change is good, so this would be a good challenge. Change is change though, neither good, nor bad. It is we who define it as such and in defining it so, Sensei made this change that might have otherwise been terrible to be something good. Change is good.

Several years before I had suffered a life threatening injury and I had not been so sanguine. I had a wound through my left leg, hips and deep into my torso, a piece of steel 17 inches long that pierced me to the center. It was a miracle I was alive. Lying in my bed I could not move and was told I might never walk or move properly again as there was nerve damage to my leg. My left leg was numb and I could not move it. High on morphine I called Sensei and said I would never do Aikido again. He told me a number of things and then said, “Never do Aikido again?” “No Sensei,” I said crying. He was silent for a long time. “Then you must do impossible. Do impossible.” So I did what he told me. With everything I had I straightened myself, then got up, unplugged myself and walked from that hospital. 12 days later was back practicing on the mat. Now here my teacher was living his own words. He was doing the impossible. In the face of never being able to do Aikido again… he was laughing. He was positive. Just a challenge. That change, no matter how bad it might seem, was good.

Sensei was my hero and inspiration, will always be my hero and inspiration, for that unvarnished moment of greatness I heard there. He lived Aikido and did not let his amputation hold him back, continuing to teach and inspire till the end of his days. He will always remain my hero for what I heard in that call.

Energy. When Sensei made the decision to die he told me, “One final point. You must release your energy.” We all must. But you Sensei released your energy to so many people all over the world who today continue to pass on that special energy, that love you gave. When Jim Soviero taught last year in my dojo, he brought a joy of practice that felt like a homecoming with Sensei. So many people around the world today who share the love of Aikido that you passed on to us. After last years memorial at the end of a class I turned off all the lights and told everyone to attack each other, as he used to do, and everyone was laughing. I would like to think your spirit was with us Sensei. Change is good. I believe that.

Love to you, Sensei-

Brian

Photo: Sugano Sensei throwing the author, 1997. Credit Jamie Kahn.

In honor of the upcoming memorial for Sugano Sensei, Heaven and Earth is reposting this piece on Sensei from 2017.

Why Sugano Sensei was Special.

On August 29th, 2010 Sensei Seiichi Sugano passed into another existence. I am Yamada Sensei’s inner student, forever grateful to him having taken me as Uchideshi but I was also close to Sugano Sensei. He was and remains the living embodiment of Aikido. In the early morning hours, unable to sleep on the 6th anniversary of his passing, I tried to define some of the reasons he is so revered by so many who studied with him. Since his passing I have struggled to define Sensei to students but have always come up short. There was so much there, where does one begin? When I try it usually just comes out as, “He was great”. I have heard the same from others who studied with him when they try. Its like there is too much to say. Here is my attempt to explain the truth of Sensei’s greatness.

Untouchable. His Aikido was different than all other Aikido I have experienced. There was some ineffable quality to it. It was very difficult to see what he was doing with his movement though he was such a large man. Something one had trouble putting a finger on. One reason was that when you attacked him he had the quality that many people ascribed to O’Sensei- he seemed to disappear. When he reappeared it… wow. Sensei Donovan Waite described it once as, “You attack and suddenly there’s nothing, like you fell in a hole and as you are climbing out… a tank drives over you.” Jim Soviero was sent by his teacher the late great Sensei Rick Stickles specifically to study from Sugano Sensei. “I don’t get that stuff Sugano’s doing over there.” Very, very hard to see, even after much training.

Joy. His classes filled a person with energy, made people happy, joyful for being there, for being alive. He was always laughing. He had a joy to him most of the time, even when he would stand over someone on Iriminage and holding their head, imitate bringing it to the mat and say, “Now Crush Head!!!” He would say these words with such a humor and incongruous joy that the entire class would burst out laughing.

Continue. His Aikido, his understanding, was always changing, always new and progressing. He might do something in a class that might never be repeated. He was supposed to write a book for many years and when I asked him he shrugged. “How to write something? Day to day understanding changing.” In an art that is said to be traditional Sensei would always stress the revolutionary nature of Aikido was in its not being fixed but an evolution on the past and something that while remembering the past, is about change and innovation. He talked about learning things outside of Aikido so that one would have additional points to understand the art, that sometimes the best way to see Aikido is to step outside of it at times. He took up western fencing in his 40’s, becoming an Olympic level competitor late in his life. These understandings contributed to his Aikido understandings. At times I and others would ask him about something he had said, particularly important points at times, and he would deny he had ever said such a thing. In reflecting on the strangeness of this recently I realized that this was perhaps his way of not being pinned to ideas he had moved past. He said to be always learning, always seeking. Sensei Jim Soviero, another who was close to him, taught at my school last Memorial said, Sensei would say one should “continue, continue” in their progress.

Amazing physicality. In a driving snow blizzard, using his bare hands on brick, Sensei somehow climbed through the second story window of New York Aikikai. Once Uchideshi’s like myself would climb the wall when we were locked out but to prevent the danger of break ins the building front was professionally machined to remove all hand holds. I tried climbing it after and almost fell, having to be rescued. That was during the day, in the summer and I was in my 20’s, highly athletic and had some experience mountain climbing. Sensei did this at night, in a snow storm so thick a person could not see their hand in front of them and Sensei was almost 60. Had I not seen him I would not have believed it was possible. I was writing at the front desk, heard something at the window and was surprised to see Sensei’s bear like paw coming through the window. I helped pull him in and amazed I asked him what he was doing. He said it was Sunday and night and he didn’t want to bother anyone for something he left at the dojo. This also speaks to the man’s humility as well. He did not want to disturb we who were there to serve him on our small time off. So he climbed a sheer wall in a blizzard with his bare hands. These years later I can only shake my head in wonder at the quality of the man…

Once I was in a rush to do something in the dojo and I ran to be back as fast as I could. I however missed seeing that Sensei had come into the dojo early to work out on his own and was getting changed. I sprinted through the flimsy curtain in the back and hit Sensei at a dead run. The next thing I was laying on the ground with the wind knocked out of me. An antique safe was left in the dojo weighing several hundred pounds and I thought for a second that someone had moved it in back of the curtain, till my head cleared and I saw Sensei standing over me laughing. It was really like I ran into something immovable, a brick wall or something.

Surprise. Sensei always had an ability to surprise. In class and with everything. David Reinfeld told me an story of how he brought a picture into the dojo he showed to several people. (David, if I have any of this wrong please tell me and I will correct.) It was a sophisticated version of the old pictures that are done with things or people hidden in them. David is a trained artist, a professional photographer who makes his living by observation. Despite this he was only able to pick out 10 or so of the 15 things hidden in the picture. Most people were only able to get less than that. David showed the picture to Sensei. He immediately picked out all 15 or so of the hidden figures. Startled, David asked him how he did that. Sensei said that it was simple. One merely had to “soften” the focus eyes like one does when in multiple attack. Then one can see everything, even what is hidden. David said it changed the way he critically observed things. He had surprising ways of explaining the art. The answer given was almost never the one expected. An example was how he described holding a person in a technique. He said it was like catching a fish with bare hands in a stream. One had to be sudden and direct to catch the fish, but soft yet firm or too much strength and the fish would jump from ones hand.

A Better World. O’Sensei talked about Aikido making the world a better place. Sugano Sensei explained how to do that. He talked about the contradiction of the practice and the ideals of Aikido and the remedy. “The idea of Aikido is about harmony and working with others. The practice makes people stronger than others who don’t. The ego becomes larger as they can do things to others with less practice cannot do. This is not real skill though. The practice is by established rules. This is false ego.” “How does someone go beyond the practice, past the ego and get to the philosophy?” “It must be by making the practice real. It must be by action which has a connection to the words the philosophy. If Aikido is about love, one must be loving- in actions and not words. If Aikido is about giving, one must give. This is why at some of my schools I have asked them to raise money for children who don’t have. This is real action and its helps to make the practice real. It makes the words more than just talking.” One must act on the ideals of Aikido in order to make one kind, generous, loving through the practice. As we improve our practice, we improve ourselves and a better world is made.

A Hero. Sensei had his leg amputated in 2003. I was in Kuwait about to go into the Iraq war when I heard. I was told that he was dying. One of the Uchideshi’s gave me Sensei’s private room number at the hospital. I called, not caring about the time, desperate to leave a message for him as we were preparing to go north into the war. To my surprise he picked up the phone only recently come from surgery. I said to him I was so sorry that he had lost his leg. He laughed in his great bear laugh. “Something good! New challenge!” He said that life is change and change is good, so this would be a good challenge. Change is change though, neither good, nor bad. It is we who define it as such and in defining it so, Sensei made this change that might have otherwise been terrible to be something good. Change is good.

Several years before I had suffered a life threatening injury and I had not been so sanguine. I had a wound through my left leg, hips and deep into my torso, a piece of steel 17 inches long that pierced me to the center. It was a miracle I was alive. Lying in my bed I could not move and was told I might never walk or move properly again as there was nerve damage to my leg. My left leg was numb and I could not move it. High on morphine I called Sensei and said I would never do Aikido again. He told me a number of things and then said, “Never do Aikido again?” “No Sensei,” I said crying. He was silent for a long time. “Then you must do impossible. Do impossible.” So I did what he told me. With everything I had I straightened myself, then got up, unplugged myself and walked from that hospital. 12 days later was back practicing on the mat. Now here my teacher was living his own words. He was doing the impossible. In the face of never being able to do Aikido again… he was laughing. He was positive. Just a challenge. That change, no matter how bad it might seem, was good.

Sensei was my hero and inspiration, will always be my hero and inspiration, for that unvarnished moment of greatness I heard there. He lived Aikido and did not let his amputation hold him back, continuing to teach and inspire till the end of his days. He will always remain my hero for what I heard in that call.

Energy. When Sensei made the decision to die he told me, “One final point. You must release your energy.” We all must. But you Sensei released your energy to so many people all over the world who today continue to pass on that special energy, that love you gave. When Jim Soviero taught last year in my dojo, he brought a joy of practice that felt like a homecoming with Sensei. So many people around the world today who share the love of Aikido that you passed on to us. After last years memorial at the end of a class I turned off all the lights and told everyone to attack each other, as he used to do, and everyone was laughing. I would like to think your spirit was with us Sensei. Change is good. I believe that.

Love to you, Sensei-

Brian

Photo: Sugano Sensei throwing the author, 1997. Credit Jamie Kahn.

The Story of our Dojo

Heaven and Earth Aikido is a traditional dojo led by chief instructor, Brian Ericksen Sensei. Ericksen Sensei is a Shidōin, and currently holds the rank of Godan (5th degree black belt).

Anthony Breda Sensei, currently ranked Nidan (2nd degree black belt), is our second instructor and enjoys teaching weapons training (with the jo and bokken)

HEA is affiliated with the United States Aikido Federation (USAF) in New York, and the Aikikai World Headquarters in Japan. Our purpose is to provide quality instruction in the martial art of Aikido according to the principles of the founder, Morihei Ueshiba.

We also share our dojo space with a second aikido school, Shin Ryu Aikido.

Videos (show all)

Winter Solstice meditations
Zendo Meditations
Solstice Meditation
Saturday Class
8/1 Class with Tammy
Jo control recommendation
Wednesday night class

Telephone

Address


688 Spring St
Herndon, VA
20170

Opening Hours

Monday 5:30pm - 8:15pm
Tuesday 7:15pm - 8pm
Wednesday 5:30pm - 7:45pm
Thursday 7:15pm - 9:15pm
Saturday 9am - 2pm
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Meg Donnelly, Nova Weekend Warriors Meg Donnelly, Nova Weekend Warriors
464 Herndon Parkway, #116
Herndon, 20170

Empowering recreational and new-to-fitness athletes to move freely and embrace their athleticism at all levels through therapeutic massage, body positive movement and easy to implement mindful breath work.

Hammer and Sickels Hammer and Sickels
13011 Bankfoot Ct
Herndon, 20171

Hammer & Sickels is dedicated to making your first shooting experience safe and enjoyable with one on one instruction to develop a strong foundation.

Jamie Bloem and Nandrolone Bio Jamie Bloem and Nandrolone Bio
Herndon, 20170

Jamie Bloem and Nandrolone - History, Doping, and Later Years

Research & Development Baseball Academy Research & Development Baseball Academy
13833 Redskin Dr.
Herndon, 20171

R&D Baseball Academy offers a comprehensive, analytics based baseball training program located in metro Washington D.C.

Hydrodynamic Training, LLC Hydrodynamic Training, LLC
Fairfax & Loudoun County
Herndon, 20170

Hydrodynamic Training, LLC provides individual & small group swim instruction for competitive swimmers, triathletes, & fitness nuts.

H.K. Lee Academy of TaeKwonDo H.K. Lee Academy of TaeKwonDo
465 Herndon Parkway
Herndon, 20170

Welcome to the H.K. Lee Academy of TaeKwonDo.

DivaFit DivaFit
317 Sunset Park Dr
Herndon, 20170

DivaFit provides a unique workout in a safe and welcoming environment! Our studio is located in Herndon, VA.

CrossFit Reston CrossFit Reston
310 Victory Dr
Herndon, 20170

We are not just a fitness facility. When you join CrossFit Reston, you become part of our amazing CrossFit community. At CrossFit Reston our mission is to provide you with the BEST and most efficient fitness training.