A-1 Tax Service

A-1 Tax Service

A1 Tax Service, Inc. has been providing tax preparation and bookkeeping services for the River Valley for over 25 years.

Operating as usual

Timeline Photos 05/26/2021

National 529 College Savings Day on Saturday - Did You Know?

If you put money in a 529 account for education, withdrawal of earnings are tax-free if used for qualified educational expenses. Qualified educational expenses include tuition, fees, housing, meals and books. Many states offer a full or partial tax deduction for 529 plan contributions. They may also offer incentives and promotions to encourage families to open and contribute to 529 accounts this coming Saturday for National 529 College Savings Day.

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) also expanded eligibility for 529 savings plans. Up to $10,000 per year can be used for Kindergarten through Grade 12 education (public, private, or religious schools).

National 529 College Savings Day on Saturday - Did You Know?

If you put money in a 529 account for education, withdrawal of earnings are tax-free if used for qualified educational expenses. Qualified educational expenses include tuition, fees, housing, meals and books. Many states offer a full or partial tax deduction for 529 plan contributions. They may also offer incentives and promotions to encourage families to open and contribute to 529 accounts this coming Saturday for National 529 College Savings Day.

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) also expanded eligibility for 529 savings plans. Up to $10,000 per year can be used for Kindergarten through Grade 12 education (public, private, or religious schools).

Timeline Photos 05/18/2021

IRS Begins Issuing Refunds for Eligible Unemployment Benefits Recipients

The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) retroactively excluded some 2020 unemployment benefits from taxable income. Generally, taxpayers with modified adjusted gross incomes below $150,000 do not have to pay tax on their first $10,200 of 2020 unemployment compensation. Unfortunately, many people who qualify for this exclusion filed their 2020 federal tax returns before the new law took effect in mid-March.

The IRS has now begun to review and adjust the returns of taxpayers who reported 2020 unemployment income. If the filer overpaid as a result of paying tax on excluded unemployment benefits, the IRS will either issue a special refund or reduce the balance of tax owed.

The IRS has begun to adjust the simplest returns affected by ARPA rules for 2020 unemployment benefits. Most of these returns belong to single filers without dependents who did not claim any refundable tax credits. After correcting all these returns and issuing appropriate refunds, IRS personnel will move on to adjust more complicated returns, such as joint returns filed by married couples.

Refunds will be sent by direct deposit to those who provided banking information on their 2020 returns, and by paper checks otherwise. The refunds will be subject to offset rules, which allow the IRS to withhold refunds to cover past-due taxes, unpaid child support or other debts. Any taxpayer whose return is adjusted will also receive an IRS notice explaining the changes made.

IRS officials have projected that this process will continue throughout the summer. In the meantime, most taxpayers who may have paid tax on excluded unemployment benefits do not have to take further action. Calling the IRS or filing an amended return will not result in a faster refund, and could even delay processing due to the need to reconcile multiple returns.

IRS Begins Issuing Refunds for Eligible Unemployment Benefits Recipients

The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) retroactively excluded some 2020 unemployment benefits from taxable income. Generally, taxpayers with modified adjusted gross incomes below $150,000 do not have to pay tax on their first $10,200 of 2020 unemployment compensation. Unfortunately, many people who qualify for this exclusion filed their 2020 federal tax returns before the new law took effect in mid-March.

The IRS has now begun to review and adjust the returns of taxpayers who reported 2020 unemployment income. If the filer overpaid as a result of paying tax on excluded unemployment benefits, the IRS will either issue a special refund or reduce the balance of tax owed.

The IRS has begun to adjust the simplest returns affected by ARPA rules for 2020 unemployment benefits. Most of these returns belong to single filers without dependents who did not claim any refundable tax credits. After correcting all these returns and issuing appropriate refunds, IRS personnel will move on to adjust more complicated returns, such as joint returns filed by married couples.

Refunds will be sent by direct deposit to those who provided banking information on their 2020 returns, and by paper checks otherwise. The refunds will be subject to offset rules, which allow the IRS to withhold refunds to cover past-due taxes, unpaid child support or other debts. Any taxpayer whose return is adjusted will also receive an IRS notice explaining the changes made.

IRS officials have projected that this process will continue throughout the summer. In the meantime, most taxpayers who may have paid tax on excluded unemployment benefits do not have to take further action. Calling the IRS or filing an amended return will not result in a faster refund, and could even delay processing due to the need to reconcile multiple returns.

A-1 Tax Service updated their business hours. 05/18/2021

A-1 Tax Service updated their business hours.

A-1 Tax Service updated their business hours.

Timeline Photos 05/13/2021

IRS Online Account – Did You Know?

All taxpayers who can properly verify their identity may set up a personal IRS online account. To create an account, simply visit the IRS View Your Account Information webpage (link below). Maintaining an online account can help you prepare for your federal tax returns, view payment history, see select IRS notices and stay on track with your tax planning and budgeting throughout the year.

Setting up an online account will be particularly helpful if you are eligible to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit for 2020. The IRS offers this credit to those who qualified for Economic Impact Payments (EIPs, also called stimulus payments) in 2020, but received either no payments or smaller payments than they deserved. To apply for the credit, you need to know the amounts of any EIPs you received. Your IRS online account will display this information.

Other information available from your online account includes any balance you owe to the IRS, your payment history (including pending payments), and digital copies of IRS notices you have received. You can also get key information from your most recent tax return, which you may need in order to get your 2020 return filed or determine your eligibility for certain credits and other programs. For detailed information from your past tax returns, you can request a transcript.

To set up your account, you will need to go through an identity verification process. Once you have gathered the required documents, registration typically takes about 15 minutes.

IRS View Your Account Portal: https://www.irs.gov/payments/view-your-tax-account.

If your 2020 federal tax return is already filed, you may check on your refund status here: https://www.irs.gov/refunds.

IRS Online Account – Did You Know?

All taxpayers who can properly verify their identity may set up a personal IRS online account. To create an account, simply visit the IRS View Your Account Information webpage (link below). Maintaining an online account can help you prepare for your federal tax returns, view payment history, see select IRS notices and stay on track with your tax planning and budgeting throughout the year.

Setting up an online account will be particularly helpful if you are eligible to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit for 2020. The IRS offers this credit to those who qualified for Economic Impact Payments (EIPs, also called stimulus payments) in 2020, but received either no payments or smaller payments than they deserved. To apply for the credit, you need to know the amounts of any EIPs you received. Your IRS online account will display this information.

Other information available from your online account includes any balance you owe to the IRS, your payment history (including pending payments), and digital copies of IRS notices you have received. You can also get key information from your most recent tax return, which you may need in order to get your 2020 return filed or determine your eligibility for certain credits and other programs. For detailed information from your past tax returns, you can request a transcript.

To set up your account, you will need to go through an identity verification process. Once you have gathered the required documents, registration typically takes about 15 minutes.

IRS View Your Account Portal: https://www.irs.gov/payments/view-your-tax-account.

If your 2020 federal tax return is already filed, you may check on your refund status here: https://www.irs.gov/refunds.

Timeline Photos 05/11/2021

Protecting Against Tax Fraud - Did You Know?

The IRS will never:

- Call to demand immediate payment using a specific payment method such as a prepaid debit card, gift card, or wire transfer
- Demand that you pay the taxes without the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed
- Threaten to bring in local police, immigration officers or other law enforcement officers

If an IRS agent shows up, they will always provide two forms of official credentials: a pocket commission and a government identification card.

The IRS may also assign certain cases to private debt collectors, but only after giving you written notice. Any payment to the private debt collectors should be made payable to the U.S Treasury.

Protecting Against Tax Fraud - Did You Know?

The IRS will never:

- Call to demand immediate payment using a specific payment method such as a prepaid debit card, gift card, or wire transfer
- Demand that you pay the taxes without the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed
- Threaten to bring in local police, immigration officers or other law enforcement officers

If an IRS agent shows up, they will always provide two forms of official credentials: a pocket commission and a government identification card.

The IRS may also assign certain cases to private debt collectors, but only after giving you written notice. Any payment to the private debt collectors should be made payable to the U.S Treasury.

Timeline Photos 05/05/2021

May 17 IRS Deadline – Pay and/or File Now to Avoid Penalties

The IRS has extended this year's deadline to May 17, 2021 for federal tax returns that were originally due on April 15. If you have not yet filed your 2020 tax return you should make every effort to do so by May 17.

If you cannot submit your 2020 return by the deadline, you can apply for an automatic filing extension to October 15, 2021. The standard way to request the extension is to file IRS Form 4868 by May 17. Bear in mind that this extension applies only to FILING your return; the payment due date will remain as May 17. Failing to pay the full amount you owe on or before May 17 may result in late fees, interest or other penalties.

If you anticipate owing tax, you should estimate the amount and include payment with your Form 4868. Alternatively, if you pay your tax with a debit or credit card or use the IRS Direct Pay or Electronic Federal Tax Payment System portal (see links below), you can get the extension to complete your return by October 15 without filing Form 4868. Simply indicate that your payment is for an automatic filing extension for tax year 2020.

If you cannot pay your tax right now due to pandemic-related hardships or other extenuating circumstances, the IRS offers installment payment options that may enable you to reduce or eliminate penalties. A tax professional can help you evaluate your options or get your return filed.

IRS Direct Pay portal: https://www.irs.gov/payments/direct-pay
Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS) portal: https://www.irs.gov/payments/eftps-the-electronic-federal-tax-payment-system
Make IRS payments with a credit or debit card: https://www.irs.gov/payments/pay-your-taxes-by-debit-or-credit-card

May 17 IRS Deadline – Pay and/or File Now to Avoid Penalties

The IRS has extended this year's deadline to May 17, 2021 for federal tax returns that were originally due on April 15. If you have not yet filed your 2020 tax return you should make every effort to do so by May 17.

If you cannot submit your 2020 return by the deadline, you can apply for an automatic filing extension to October 15, 2021. The standard way to request the extension is to file IRS Form 4868 by May 17. Bear in mind that this extension applies only to FILING your return; the payment due date will remain as May 17. Failing to pay the full amount you owe on or before May 17 may result in late fees, interest or other penalties.

If you anticipate owing tax, you should estimate the amount and include payment with your Form 4868. Alternatively, if you pay your tax with a debit or credit card or use the IRS Direct Pay or Electronic Federal Tax Payment System portal (see links below), you can get the extension to complete your return by October 15 without filing Form 4868. Simply indicate that your payment is for an automatic filing extension for tax year 2020.

If you cannot pay your tax right now due to pandemic-related hardships or other extenuating circumstances, the IRS offers installment payment options that may enable you to reduce or eliminate penalties. A tax professional can help you evaluate your options or get your return filed.

IRS Direct Pay portal: https://www.irs.gov/payments/direct-pay
Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS) portal: https://www.irs.gov/payments/eftps-the-electronic-federal-tax-payment-system
Make IRS payments with a credit or debit card: https://www.irs.gov/payments/pay-your-taxes-by-debit-or-credit-card

Timeline Photos 05/03/2021

Claiming the Recovery Rebate Credit – Did You Know?

With the May 17 deadline to file 2020 federal tax returns rapidly approaching, many eligible Americans who don't file may risk losing out on a crucial tax credit. The Recovery Rebate Credit is offered to all taxpayers who file their 2020 returns and were underpaid when the IRS distributed 2020 Economic Impact Payments (EIPs, also called stimulus payments).

For a variety of reasons, some taxpayers may not have received the EIPs that they qualified for in 2020. Others received EIPs, but in smaller amounts than they deserved. Often, this problem occurred because the IRS had outdated information about the person's income or family size. For example, if a child was born or adopted into your family in 2020, the IRS likely did not have this information when calculating EIP amounts.

The first round of stimulus payments, called EIP1, included payments of up to $1,200 per individual and $500 per qualifying child. The IRS began sending these payments in spring 2020 and continued sending them throughout the year. The second round (EIP2) included payments of up to $600 per individual and $600 per qualifying child. Most recipients got their EIP2s in January 2021.

If the IRS underpaid you during either 2020 EIP round, the Recovery Rebate Credit enables you to receive the balance that you are owed as an IRS refund. However, you can only claim the credit by filing a 2020 tax return, even if you owe no tax and are not usually required to file.

A tax professional can help you prepare and file your return electronically so you receive your payment as quickly as possible. You will need to know the amounts of any EIPs you received, which you can get from IRS Notice 1444 (1444-A or 1444-B), or by setting up an online IRS account (link below).

Create an online IRS account: https://www.irs.gov/payments/view-your-tax-account.

Claiming the Recovery Rebate Credit – Did You Know?

With the May 17 deadline to file 2020 federal tax returns rapidly approaching, many eligible Americans who don't file may risk losing out on a crucial tax credit. The Recovery Rebate Credit is offered to all taxpayers who file their 2020 returns and were underpaid when the IRS distributed 2020 Economic Impact Payments (EIPs, also called stimulus payments).

For a variety of reasons, some taxpayers may not have received the EIPs that they qualified for in 2020. Others received EIPs, but in smaller amounts than they deserved. Often, this problem occurred because the IRS had outdated information about the person's income or family size. For example, if a child was born or adopted into your family in 2020, the IRS likely did not have this information when calculating EIP amounts.

The first round of stimulus payments, called EIP1, included payments of up to $1,200 per individual and $500 per qualifying child. The IRS began sending these payments in spring 2020 and continued sending them throughout the year. The second round (EIP2) included payments of up to $600 per individual and $600 per qualifying child. Most recipients got their EIP2s in January 2021.

If the IRS underpaid you during either 2020 EIP round, the Recovery Rebate Credit enables you to receive the balance that you are owed as an IRS refund. However, you can only claim the credit by filing a 2020 tax return, even if you owe no tax and are not usually required to file.

A tax professional can help you prepare and file your return electronically so you receive your payment as quickly as possible. You will need to know the amounts of any EIPs you received, which you can get from IRS Notice 1444 (1444-A or 1444-B), or by setting up an online IRS account (link below).

Create an online IRS account: https://www.irs.gov/payments/view-your-tax-account.

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2125 S 56th St
Fort Smith, AR
72903

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 18:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 18:00
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Kaily's Tax Service Kaily's Tax Service
507 N Greenwood Aver Suite A, Fort Smith, AR 72901
Fort Smith, 72901

-Servicio de sus taxes(Impuestos) -Servicio de Notario -Optener numero ITIN(pin) -TAX PREPARATION SERVICE! - NOTARY PUBLIC -WESTERN UNION -BILL PAYMT