Just Law International

Immigration Law Firm in Fairfax, Virginia. Just Law International is an experienced Immigration Law firm dealing primarily with U.S. visa and asylum cases.

Our team of highly skilled attorneys and staff members represent businesses and individuals from around the world. Located in the greater Washington D.C. area, our firm can conveniently represent clients within every jurisdiction of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (formerly the INS and now part of the Department of Homeland Security). In business since 1996, we boast an excellent rep

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Looking forward to serving your immigration needs. 03/31/2021

Looking forward to serving your immigration needs.

Looking forward to serving your immigration needs.
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03/31/2021

Greetings from the staff of Just Law International.

Greetings from the staff of Just Law International.

12/25/2019

To all our clients and friends, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from all of us at Just Law.

justimmigrationlawblog.com 12/25/2018

All of us at Just Law wish you all a blessed new year.

All of us at Just Law wish you all a blessed new year.
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justimmigrationlawblog.com 12/25/2018

All of us at Just Law wish you all a blessed new year.

All of us at Just Law wish you all a blessed new year.
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[09/08/17]   Litigation developments concerning the Trump administration’s plan to end the DACA program. Notably, fifteen states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit, State of New York, et al. v. Trump, et al. (E.D.N.Y.), challenging the rescission of the DACA program on the following grounds: (1) violation of the equal protection guarantee under the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment; (2) violation of the due process guarantee under the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment; (3) substantive and procedural arbitrary and capricious action, abuse of discretion and violation of the Administrative Procedure Act by federal agencies; and (4) failure to issue Regulatory Flexibility Analyses under the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

Additionally, yesterday the National Immigration Law Center filed a motion to amend its complaint in Batalla Vidal v. Baran, et al. (E.D.N.Y.) to add related claims, including: (1) violation of the Administrative Procedure Act’s prohibition against arbitrary and capricious agency action; and (2) violation of equal protection under the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment due to discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity and national origin. The motion to amend cites that the withdrawal of the DACA program is “substantially motivated by the animus of the President and his administration toward Latinos and Mexicans.”

[09/07/17]   The Senate Judiciary hearing on DACA is now posted online:
The Long-term Impact of Immigration: Exploring Reforms to our Nation’s Guest Worker Programs and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, and their Potential Impact on the American Economy and Local Communities
Full Committee
Date: Wednesday, September 13, 2017Add to my Calendar
Time: 10:00 AM
Location: Dirksen Senate Office Building 226
Presiding: Chairman Grassley
Witnesses
Panel I
1. Mr. Michael Dougherty
Assistant Secretary For Border, Immigration, And Trade
Office Of Strategy, Policy, And Plans
United States Department Of Homeland Security
Washington, DC
2. Mr. John R. Martin
Senior Policy Advisor
Employment And Training Administration
United States Department Of Labor
Washington, DC
Panel II
1. Mr. Daniel Costa
Director Of Immigration Law And Policy Research
Economic Policy Institute
Washington, DC
2. Dr. Ron Hira
Associate Professor
Department Of Political Science
Howard University
Washington, DC
3. Ms. Jessica Vaughan
Director Of Policy Studies
Center For Immigration Studies
Washington, DC
4. Mr. Paul E. Almeida
President
Department For Professional Employees
AFL-CIO
Washington, DC
5. Mr. Randel K. Johnson
Senior Vice President
Labor, Immigration And Employee Benefits
U.S. Chamber Of Commerce
Washington, DC
6. Dr. Douglas Holtz-Eakin
President
American Action Forum
Washington , DC

[09/07/17]   The September 5, 2017 memo and accompanying FAQs rescind the June 15, 2012 memorandum, allow current DACA recipients to keep their work authorization and deferred action grants until they expire, and take the following steps to end the DACA program:

 Initial DACA Applications: USCIS will adjudicate properly filed initial DACA requests and associated applications for work authorization that were accepted by USCIS as of September 5, 2017. USCIS will reject any initial DACA requests received after September 5, 2017.

 Renewal DACA Applications: USCIS will adjudicate renewal DACA applications and associated applications for work authorization that have been accepted by USCIS as of September 5, 2017. Until October 5, 2017, USCIS will also continue to accept renewal applications filed by DACA recipients whose benefits expire on or before March 5, 2018. USCIS will reject all DACA renewal requests that do not fit these parameters, including all applications received after October 5, 2017.

 Applications for Advance Parole Based on DACA Grants: Effective September 5, 2017, USCIS will not approve any DACA-based applications for Advance Parole (Forms I-131). Any pending applications for advance parole will be administratively closed, and USCIS will refund the filing fees. Although DHS also stated that it will generally honor the validity period for previously approved applications for advance parole, the FAQs note that CBP retains the right to refuse admission to a person who presents themselves at a port of entry as a matter of discretion.

 Current EADs that Are Lost, Stolen, or Destroyed: The DHS FAQs state that individuals can still apply to replace a valid EAD that has been lost, stolen, or destroyed.

[09/06/17]   On 9/5/17, Ranking Member of the Senate Judiciary Committee Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) released a statement in response to the Trump administration’s decision to end DACA. The Senator called on her colleagues to protect DACA recipients by voting on the DREAM Act “as soon as possible.”

[09/06/17]   On 9/5/17, Representative Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) released a statement in response to the Trump administration’s decision to end DACA. The Representative called on members of Congress to debate and vote on the DREAM Act, which was introduced by Ros-Lehtinen and Roybal-Allard on 7/26/17.

[09/06/17]   On Tuesday, September 5, 2017, at 11:00 am ET, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the rescission of the DACA program.
Attorney General Sessions Press Briefing
Attorney General Sessions Delivers Remarks on DACA
DHS promptly released the following materials:
DHS Press Release: Rescission Of Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
DHS Memorandum: Rescission of the June 15, 2012 Memorandum Entitled "Exercising Prosecutorial Discretion with Respect to Individuals Who Came to the United States as Children"
DHS FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions: Rescission Of Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

[01/30/17]   STATEMENT BY SECRETARY JOHN KELLY ON THE ENTRY OF LAWFUL PERMANENT RESIDENTS INTO THE UNITED STATES

WASHINGTON – In applying the provisions of the president's executive order, I hereby deem the entry of lawful permanent residents to be in the national interest.

Accordingly, absent the receipt of significant derogatory information indicating a serious threat to public safety and welfare, lawful permanent resident status will be a dispositive factor in our case-by-case determinations.

[01/29/17]   Last night a decision was made on refugees. For now this language can be shared publicly:

"Based on authority in the executive order issued on Friday Jan 27, refugees (not of the 7 specifically banned nationalities) that had been scheduled to arrive in the next few days will be allowed entry to the U.S. upon arrival."

Gregory Chen
Director of Advocacy
American Immigration Lawyers Association
1331 G Street, NW, Suite 300
Washington, DC 20005

[01/29/17]   Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on President Trump’s Refugee Executive Order
January 28, 2017

NOTE: This document is not legal advice but instead provides the best answers that we can provide at this time. It is subject to change as additional guidance is released from the U.S. Government. Additionally, the legality of the actions in the President’s Executive Order are subject to judicial review. Please be aware that certain aspects of the order may be contested for its constitutionality.

How long is the stop to the refugee resettlement program and for whom?
The U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) is being suspended for 120 days for all populations. Additionally, Syrian refugees have an indefinite bar on being resettled, until such time that the President determines that sufficient changes have been made to the USRAP. The executive order does not specify what sufficient changes need to look like. The Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) has cancelled all travel for Iraqi, Iranian, Syrian, Somali, Sudanese, Yemeni, and Libyan nationalities in the USRAP, with no exceptions. This includes refugees, SIVs, visa 93s, and parolees. It also includes those who may be considered a religious minority in their country of nationality. Please note – this does not include Afghan SIVs who may book their own travel (see further guidance later in this document). Further guidance on other nationalities traveling January 30 – February 2, 2017 will be issued by PRM as soon as possible. Beginning on February 3, 2017, all refugee travel will be cancelled until further notice.

The State Department is working with other parts of the U.S. government to confirm which cases may be subject to an exception to this pause. The State Department does not yet have the authority to permit any exceptions.

A complete halt of the USRAP for such a length of time is unprecedented. After 9/11, the program was suspended for less than three months.

What else does the order do?
The order further bans residents of seven countries, including green card holders from Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq and Sudan from visiting or entering the U.S. for 90 days. Other countries may be added to the list, as determined by the Secretaries for the Department of State (DOS) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Adjudications of other immigration benefits could be impacted. On a case-by-case basis, and when in the national interest, Secretaries for the Department of State (DOS) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) may issue visas or other immigration benefits to nationals of countries for which visas and benefits are otherwise blocked.

Are there exceptions to the 120-day stop for refugee resettlement?
Yes, but only on a case-by-case exception as determined by the Secretary of State and Secretary of Homeland Security. Exceptions can be made on a case-by-case basis by the Administration if it is in the national interest, the person would not pose a risk, the person is a religious minority facing religious persecution, the admission of the person is required to conform U.S. conduct to an international agreement, or when a person is already in transit and denying admission would cause undue hardship. It is unclear at this time how the Administration may implement such exceptions.

When will the USRAP resume?
The program may resume on May 27, 2017, which is 120 days from the signing of the Executive Order on January 27, 2017. At that point, the program shall only resume for certain countries if the Secretary of State, Secretary of DHS, and the Director of National Intelligence determine there are sufficient safeguards in place.

If refugees are in the pipeline, will they be able to be resettled during the 120 days?
Refugees currently in the pipeline may be admitted after they complete additional screening processes that will be devised by the Secretary of State and Secretary of DHS. The executive order does not specifically mention what these requirements will be or when they will be implemented, but it is possible that refugees currently in the pipeline may begin to be admitted after certain processes are in place. It is important to note that during the 120-day period, security and medical clearances for previously travel-ready refugees may expire and that these security checks and medicals will need to be re-requested. This is in addition to other requirements that may be implemented.
After the pause is lifted, the ceiling on admissions will remain at 50,000, as determined under this executive order.

As of January 27, 2017 there were 67,689 refugees in the U.S. pipeline (approved by DHS). This includes 13,928 Somalis, 10,680 Iraqis, 8,886 Syrians, 1,805 Sudanese, 983 Iranians, and 29 Yemenis.

Once the USRAP pause is lifted, will the program be the same?
No, the executive order has placed several guidelines that will shape the purpose and function of the program. They include:
• The President has essentially amended the previous Presidential Determination for Refugee Admissions for Fiscal Year 2017, which had allowed for the admission of up to 110,000 refugees, to an amended maximum number of 50,000 refugees.
• The executive order directs that when the program resumes, the program should prioritize the resettlement of religious-based persecution claims of religious minorities.
• This executive order ceases resettlement for Syrians until such time that vetting procedures for Syrians are deemed “consistent with the national interest” by the President.
• The executive order directs the Secretary of DHS to examine existing law to determine if the executive could provide more determinative power to state and local governments resettling refugees. Given current efforts to stop resettlement in certain states and localities, this makes it more important than ever for us to lift up support for resettlement among communities and state and local policy makers.

Are Syrians excluded from resettlement indefinitely?
Yes, the executive order directs an indefinite pause on the resettlement of Syrian nationals until the President can ensure the resettlement of Syrians is “consistent with the national interest.” At this time, it is unclear what those stipulations are and what specific factors define “national interest.”

Which nationalities are specifically impacted by this executive order?
There is a full suspension of all refugees for a period of 120 days while the Secretaries of State and DHS review the program. The executive order allows for exceptions for admission on a case-by-case basis and for religious minorities. Immigrants and nonimmigrants from Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Iran, Somalia, Yemen, and Libya are suspended from entry for 90 days as of January 27, 2017. Syrians are suspended from resettlement indefinitely, pending review.

If I am a foreign national from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, can I travel outside the U.S.?
As of now, it is advised that no one from one of the listed countries should travel outside of the United States unless they are a naturalized U.S. Citizen. This includes a recommendation that Lawful Permanent Residents should not travel outside the United States. Foreign nationals of these countries are encouraged to make a free appointment at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) by visiting https://my.uscis.gov/appointment or consult an accredited representative or lawyer who specializes in immigration law. This website provides a national mapping of immigration lawyers: https://www.immigrationlawhelp.org/. (See also: https://www.uscis.gov/avoid-scams).

What kind of changes will happen in the screening process for refugees?
The executive order directs that the screening process for all refugees and immigrants should include a process to “evaluate the applicant’s likelihood of becoming a positive contributing member of society and the applicant’s ability to make contributions to the national interest.” As of today, USCIS circuit rides are suspended, but other processing activities, with the exception of travel and related out-processing activities, continue. The Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs will issue separate guidance regarding the continuation or suspension of visa processing.

What if I am a Syrian and currently present in the U.S. claiming asylum or here under Temporary Protected Status?
As of yet it remains unclear whether the new screening process will impact recipients of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) or any group of migrants including Syrians. Some applicants and visa holder may be required to go through additional screening.

Will services to refugees who have arrived in the U.S. on or before the date of the executive order continue?
As of now, yes. The executive order did not include any restrictions to services to refugees. Funding for resettlement services is dependent upon Congress, and appropriations have already been allocated through April 28, 2017. However, further funds must be appropriated for these accounts on or before April 28, 2017 when the current continuing resolution ends. We will have to make our voices heard to Members of Congress to ensure that this funding is robust.

What about refugees who were supposed to arrive in the coming week(s)?
The Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration has cancelled all travel for Iraqi, Iranian, Syrian, Somali, Sudanese, Yemeni, and Libyan nationalities in the USRAP, with no exceptions. This includes refugees, SIVs, visa 93s, and parolees. It also includes those who may be considered a religious minority in their country of nationality. Further guidance on other nationalities traveling January 30 – February 2, 2017 will be issued by the State Department as soon as possible. Beginning on February 3, 2017, all refugee travel will be cancelled until further notice.
We do not recommend that Iraqi SIVs self-book flights during the 90-day ban and until further guidance is released from the U.S. government. It is recommended that Afghan SIVs seek legal guidance before moving forward with self-booking until further guidance is released from the U.S. government.

While additional guidance for case-by-case exceptions may be forthcoming from the State Department, we do not anticipate large numbers of refugees being admitted through the USRAP during the pause, despite the possibility of exceptions. Thus, we do not recommend moving forward with securing leases, putting down security deposits, or otherwise preparing homes for arrivals for any clients expected to arrive after February 2, 2017.

Assurances will not be requested during the 120-day pause in the program, and allocations meetings will be suspended during this time.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has temporarily halted all USCIS circuit rides to interview refugees. Resettlement Support Centers are still staffed around the world and will be providing information to clients in the coming days.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) is not making any additional bookings for refugees or SIVs as arrivals have been suspended for the next 120 days. There are thousands of refugees and SIVs booked for travel between February and March 2017; these individuals will likely be removed from travel; however, save for Iraqi, Iranian, Syrian, Somali, Sudanese, Yemeni, and Libyan nationalities, this has not yet occurred.

What does the executive order mean for Afghan and Iraqi SIVs?
All nationals from Iraq, including Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) holders from Iraq, are banned completely from entering the U.S. for a period of 90 days from January 27, 2017. SIV holders from Afghanistan do not appear to be immediately affected by this executive order. Family members joining their Afghan SIV holder family member go through a SIV follow-to-join process that comes from the same SIV statute so any family members of an SIV holder will fall under same restrictions (or not) as the anchor. We are awaiting further guidance from DHS and the State Department on how this executive order will affect this population. We do not recommend that Iraqi SIVs self-book flights during the 90-day ban and until further guidance is released from the U.S. government. We recommend that Afghan SIVs seek legal guidance before moving forward with self-booking their flight until further guidance is released from the U.S. government.

If I am refugee in the U.S., how will this executive order affect me?
The executive order does require additional screening for certain individuals already present in the United States. It remains to be seen what--if any--impact it might have on your legal status or your ability to further adjust your status when you are eligible to do so. This executive order may limit your ability to file for family reunification in the immediate future, depending on how the executive order is implemented.

What do we know now about changes to refugee processing?
• The Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs will issue separate guidance regarding the continuation or suspension of Visas 93 cases.
• For P-3 cases, AOR prescreening may continue but USCIS circuit rides are suspended, as is travel and related out-processing activities.

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