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Anyone needing to hear this today? 😀
minnesota department of labor and industry
Wage and Hour Bulletin
November 2019

Overtime laws in Minnesota
It’s that time of year again, and for many workers the holiday season brings an increase in work hours and questions about being paid for overtime hours.

Navigating state and federal overtime requirements
Employers are subject to both state and federal overtime requirements. Employers should carefully review the federal Fair Labor Standards Act to determine if they may be exempt from those requirements before concluding only state law applies.

Federal law
The federal Fair Labor Standards Act requires some employers to pay overtime for all hours worked in excess of 40 hours in a seven-day period. These employers include:

businesses whose employees produce or handle goods for interstate commerce;
businesses with gross annual sales of more than $500,000; and
certain other businesses, including hospitals, nursing homes, schools and government agencies.
State law
The Minnesota Fair Labor Standards Act requires all employers, regardless of gross annual revenue, to pay overtime for all hours worked in excess of 48 hours in a seven-day period. State law does allow employers to designate certain employees as exempt from overtime, based on job duties, salary requirements and other criteria. Information about exemptions can be found in the Minnesota Fair Labor Standards Act and Minnesota Rules 5200.

New federal salary threshold for exempt employees
Employers who are subject to federal overtime requirements should be aware that the minimum weekly salary for exempt employees is schedule to increase to $684 per week on January 1, 2020. See the US DOL's Final Rule website for more information.

What is the overtime rate?
Overtime rates must be at least one and a half times the employee’s regular rate of pay. The regular rate of pay is determined by dividing the employee’s total pay in any workweek by the total hours worked in the workweek. An employee’s pay includes credits allowed against the minimum wage for meals and/or lodging. There are some exclusions from wages employers can make when determining the regular rate.

Questions?
Labor Standards serves the citizens of Minnesota by providing
information about the state's wage, hour and employment laws.

Phone: 651-284-5075 or 800-342-5354
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.dli.mn.gov

minnesota department of labor and industry
Happy Thanksgiving!
Can you believe it???
Our office will be closed on July 4th and 5th! Have a wonderful holiday!
Is This Your Situation: Concerned About Employees' Social Media


You have a potential employee, and you're considering a check of his or her social media, thinking this may provide a deeper insight into the candidate's behavior. Contrary to popular belief, a social media check is not performed solely to find negative information about candidates. Instead, social media screening also helps you get a full picture of the applicant.

Why should you even bother? Because in today's online world, a candidate's social media profile often provides a deeper insight into a candidate's behavior. You may be thinking that checking social media lets you see more readily the candidate’s true self — personality, temperament and relatively uninhibited social interactions. And especially if the job applied for is media-related, like a manager of public relations or a social media strategist, the evaluation of the candidate's online presence and knowledge may be invaluable.

To take advantage of these insights, it's essential that you use a qualified background screening company to run social media background checks. Indeed, before you begin, it's important to note that it's a tricky situation. You want all the information legally available from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and more, but you don't want step over the line and violate anti-discrimination rules.

Whatever the position you're hiring for, you want to know, without risking discrimination charges, whether your potential or current employees violate the company's standards for online behavior. You want supporting data that accurately predicts the on-the-job performance and retention of new hires. This ensures you will be following the relevant rules regarding accuracy, time frame and other regulations under the Fair Credit Reporting Act when including any information derived from social media. Of course, you realize that you want to stay away from out-of-bounds information like family status, religion, political affiliation or s*xual orientation.

You need to understand that only legal and job-related factors should be used to assess or reject a candidate. If an individual has social media set to private, you will agree to see only what is legally available. This could include links, screen names and screenshots.

Using a background screening company to run social media background checks ensures following the rules under the current regulations with accuracy and in a timely manner — the standard lookback period is one year, with report turnarounds of two to three business days. For more information on social media background checks, give us a call. We'll help you sign up with National Crime Search, our trusted partner that can help you screen current and potential employees.

Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved.
Is This Your Situation: Concerned About Employees' Social Media


You have a potential employee, and you're considering a check of his or her social media, thinking this may provide a deeper insight into the candidate's behavior. Contrary to popular belief, a social media check is not performed solely to find negative information about candidates. Instead, social media screening also helps you get a full picture of the applicant.

Why should you even bother? Because in today's online world, a candidate's social media profile often provides a deeper insight into a candidate's behavior. You may be thinking that checking social media lets you see more readily the candidate’s true self — personality, temperament and relatively uninhibited social interactions. And especially if the job applied for is media-related, like a manager of public relations or a social media strategist, the evaluation of the candidate's online presence and knowledge may be invaluable.

To take advantage of these insights, it's essential that you use a qualified background screening company to run social media background checks. Indeed, before you begin, it's important to note that it's a tricky situation. You want all the information legally available from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and more, but you don't want step over the line and violate anti-discrimination rules.

Whatever the position you're hiring for, you want to know, without risking discrimination charges, whether your potential or current employees violate the company's standards for online behavior. You want supporting data that accurately predicts the on-the-job performance and retention of new hires. This ensures you will be following the relevant rules regarding accuracy, time frame and other regulations under the Fair Credit Reporting Act when including any information derived from social media. Of course, you realize that you want to stay away from out-of-bounds information like family status, religion, political affiliation or s*xual orientation.

You need to understand that only legal and job-related factors should be used to assess or reject a candidate. If an individual has social media set to private, you will agree to see only what is legally available. This could include links, screen names and screenshots.

Using a background screening company to run social media background checks ensures following the rules under the current regulations with accuracy and in a timely manner — the standard lookback period is one year, with report turnarounds of two to three business days. For more information on social media background checks, give us a call. We'll help you sign up with National Crime Search, our trusted partner that can help you screen current and potential employees.

Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved.
We will be closed on Monday May 27th and will resume regular business hours on Tuesday May 28th.
Happy Easter from all of us at I Comp!
Take Stock of the Top Benefits Trends


Smart companies are always taking a fresh look at the benefits they're offering. Here is what's trending and what you might want to consider adding.

Student loan assistance

According to the Federal Reserve, Americans currently owe $1.5 trillion in student loans — the largest amount of nonhousing consumer debt, surpassing both auto loans and credit card debt.

However, only 4 percent of employers presently offer some type of student loan assistance. Normally, these employers contribute a monthly or yearly dollar amount, up to a specific maximum or until the debt is paid off.

More employers are expected to start helping employees with their student loan debt. Note that 65 percent of the current national student loan debt belongs to people under the age of 40. So, if your company employs people within that age group, you may want to look into this benefit.

Paid sick leave

Employees without paid sick leave are "three times more likely to delay seeking medical care" or three times more likely to not obtain any treatment at all, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. This can adversely affect the health and productivity of not just sick employees but also the employees around them. Recognizing these consequences, many employers, states and cities provide paid sick leave.

In 2019, employers can expect even more states and local governments to propose and enact mandatory sick leave policies. If your state doesn't require paid sick leave, this could change, so be sure to keep an eye out for regulatory changes.

Health insurance cost

The cost of group health insurance is predicted to rise 5 percent in 2019, reaching nearly $15,000 per employee, according to the National Business Group on Health. Typically, employers cover around 70 percent of the cost.

In 2019, employers are forecast to become even more proactive about curbing health care costs. For example, the implementation of virtual health care solutions has been identified as a top initiative for employers in 2019.

Flexible benefits

Flexible benefit plans allow employees to choose the benefits they want or need based on their personal situation. For instance, employees can select the health insurance plan, retirement options, and flexible spending account that best suit their individual needs.

Flexible benefits are gaining steam among employers, and this trend is predicted to continue in 2019. According to a 2018/2019 global survey by Thomson Online Benefits, 51 percent of surveyed organizations have implemented flexible benefit plans while 14 percent plan to do so in the future.

There's also a need for targeted communication of flexible benefits. For example, you should have a communications strategy that helps expecting parents and near-retirees understand the benefits available to them.

Unlimited PTO

There's been a lot of buzz surrounding unlimited vacation or PTO, but in reality, employers have been slow to adopt this benefit. And those who offer it may be phasing it out in 2019.

Dice Insights reports that instead of giving unlimited PTO, employers are offering increased time off for specific reasons such as illness, maternity and paternity leave, or bereavement.

Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved

We provide payroll & human resource management services that comply with employment regulations, edu Integrated Compensation Systems, Inc. (IComp), based in St.

If you need a human resource in the area of calculating paychecks, payroll tax compliance, employee administration or human resource management, you have come to the right place. Paul, Minnesota, has been providing professional and personalized payroll processing and human resource services since 1993. We serve small and midsized companies throughout Minnesota and western Wisconsin and can process payroll in all 50 states. Give us a call today, it pays!

01/29/2020

Anyone needing to hear this today? 😀

11/28/2019
Home | Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry 11/27/2019

Home | Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry

minnesota department of labor and industry
Wage and Hour Bulletin
November 2019

Overtime laws in Minnesota
It’s that time of year again, and for many workers the holiday season brings an increase in work hours and questions about being paid for overtime hours.

Navigating state and federal overtime requirements
Employers are subject to both state and federal overtime requirements. Employers should carefully review the federal Fair Labor Standards Act to determine if they may be exempt from those requirements before concluding only state law applies.

Federal law
The federal Fair Labor Standards Act requires some employers to pay overtime for all hours worked in excess of 40 hours in a seven-day period. These employers include:

businesses whose employees produce or handle goods for interstate commerce;
businesses with gross annual sales of more than $500,000; and
certain other businesses, including hospitals, nursing homes, schools and government agencies.
State law
The Minnesota Fair Labor Standards Act requires all employers, regardless of gross annual revenue, to pay overtime for all hours worked in excess of 48 hours in a seven-day period. State law does allow employers to designate certain employees as exempt from overtime, based on job duties, salary requirements and other criteria. Information about exemptions can be found in the Minnesota Fair Labor Standards Act and Minnesota Rules 5200.

New federal salary threshold for exempt employees
Employers who are subject to federal overtime requirements should be aware that the minimum weekly salary for exempt employees is schedule to increase to $684 per week on January 1, 2020. See the US DOL's Final Rule website for more information.

What is the overtime rate?
Overtime rates must be at least one and a half times the employee’s regular rate of pay. The regular rate of pay is determined by dividing the employee’s total pay in any workweek by the total hours worked in the workweek. An employee’s pay includes credits allowed against the minimum wage for meals and/or lodging. There are some exclusions from wages employers can make when determining the regular rate.

Questions?
Labor Standards serves the citizens of Minnesota by providing
information about the state's wage, hour and employment laws.

Phone: 651-284-5075 or 800-342-5354
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.dli.mn.gov

minnesota department of labor and industry

Home | Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry

11/27/2019

Happy Thanksgiving!

07/31/2019

Can you believe it???

07/01/2019

Our office will be closed on July 4th and 5th! Have a wonderful holiday!

06/14/2019

Is This Your Situation: Concerned About Employees' Social Media


You have a potential employee, and you're considering a check of his or her social media, thinking this may provide a deeper insight into the candidate's behavior. Contrary to popular belief, a social media check is not performed solely to find negative information about candidates. Instead, social media screening also helps you get a full picture of the applicant.

Why should you even bother? Because in today's online world, a candidate's social media profile often provides a deeper insight into a candidate's behavior. You may be thinking that checking social media lets you see more readily the candidate’s true self — personality, temperament and relatively uninhibited social interactions. And especially if the job applied for is media-related, like a manager of public relations or a social media strategist, the evaluation of the candidate's online presence and knowledge may be invaluable.

To take advantage of these insights, it's essential that you use a qualified background screening company to run social media background checks. Indeed, before you begin, it's important to note that it's a tricky situation. You want all the information legally available from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and more, but you don't want step over the line and violate anti-discrimination rules.

Whatever the position you're hiring for, you want to know, without risking discrimination charges, whether your potential or current employees violate the company's standards for online behavior. You want supporting data that accurately predicts the on-the-job performance and retention of new hires. This ensures you will be following the relevant rules regarding accuracy, time frame and other regulations under the Fair Credit Reporting Act when including any information derived from social media. Of course, you realize that you want to stay away from out-of-bounds information like family status, religion, political affiliation or s*xual orientation.

You need to understand that only legal and job-related factors should be used to assess or reject a candidate. If an individual has social media set to private, you will agree to see only what is legally available. This could include links, screen names and screenshots.

Using a background screening company to run social media background checks ensures following the rules under the current regulations with accuracy and in a timely manner — the standard lookback period is one year, with report turnarounds of two to three business days. For more information on social media background checks, give us a call. We'll help you sign up with National Crime Search, our trusted partner that can help you screen current and potential employees.

Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved.

06/14/2019

Is This Your Situation: Concerned About Employees' Social Media


You have a potential employee, and you're considering a check of his or her social media, thinking this may provide a deeper insight into the candidate's behavior. Contrary to popular belief, a social media check is not performed solely to find negative information about candidates. Instead, social media screening also helps you get a full picture of the applicant.

Why should you even bother? Because in today's online world, a candidate's social media profile often provides a deeper insight into a candidate's behavior. You may be thinking that checking social media lets you see more readily the candidate’s true self — personality, temperament and relatively uninhibited social interactions. And especially if the job applied for is media-related, like a manager of public relations or a social media strategist, the evaluation of the candidate's online presence and knowledge may be invaluable.

To take advantage of these insights, it's essential that you use a qualified background screening company to run social media background checks. Indeed, before you begin, it's important to note that it's a tricky situation. You want all the information legally available from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and more, but you don't want step over the line and violate anti-discrimination rules.

Whatever the position you're hiring for, you want to know, without risking discrimination charges, whether your potential or current employees violate the company's standards for online behavior. You want supporting data that accurately predicts the on-the-job performance and retention of new hires. This ensures you will be following the relevant rules regarding accuracy, time frame and other regulations under the Fair Credit Reporting Act when including any information derived from social media. Of course, you realize that you want to stay away from out-of-bounds information like family status, religion, political affiliation or s*xual orientation.

You need to understand that only legal and job-related factors should be used to assess or reject a candidate. If an individual has social media set to private, you will agree to see only what is legally available. This could include links, screen names and screenshots.

Using a background screening company to run social media background checks ensures following the rules under the current regulations with accuracy and in a timely manner — the standard lookback period is one year, with report turnarounds of two to three business days. For more information on social media background checks, give us a call. We'll help you sign up with National Crime Search, our trusted partner that can help you screen current and potential employees.

Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved.

05/22/2019

We will be closed on Monday May 27th and will resume regular business hours on Tuesday May 28th.

04/21/2019

Happy Easter from all of us at I Comp!

04/16/2019

Take Stock of the Top Benefits Trends


Smart companies are always taking a fresh look at the benefits they're offering. Here is what's trending and what you might want to consider adding.

Student loan assistance

According to the Federal Reserve, Americans currently owe $1.5 trillion in student loans — the largest amount of nonhousing consumer debt, surpassing both auto loans and credit card debt.

However, only 4 percent of employers presently offer some type of student loan assistance. Normally, these employers contribute a monthly or yearly dollar amount, up to a specific maximum or until the debt is paid off.

More employers are expected to start helping employees with their student loan debt. Note that 65 percent of the current national student loan debt belongs to people under the age of 40. So, if your company employs people within that age group, you may want to look into this benefit.

Paid sick leave

Employees without paid sick leave are "three times more likely to delay seeking medical care" or three times more likely to not obtain any treatment at all, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. This can adversely affect the health and productivity of not just sick employees but also the employees around them. Recognizing these consequences, many employers, states and cities provide paid sick leave.

In 2019, employers can expect even more states and local governments to propose and enact mandatory sick leave policies. If your state doesn't require paid sick leave, this could change, so be sure to keep an eye out for regulatory changes.

Health insurance cost

The cost of group health insurance is predicted to rise 5 percent in 2019, reaching nearly $15,000 per employee, according to the National Business Group on Health. Typically, employers cover around 70 percent of the cost.

In 2019, employers are forecast to become even more proactive about curbing health care costs. For example, the implementation of virtual health care solutions has been identified as a top initiative for employers in 2019.

Flexible benefits

Flexible benefit plans allow employees to choose the benefits they want or need based on their personal situation. For instance, employees can select the health insurance plan, retirement options, and flexible spending account that best suit their individual needs.

Flexible benefits are gaining steam among employers, and this trend is predicted to continue in 2019. According to a 2018/2019 global survey by Thomson Online Benefits, 51 percent of surveyed organizations have implemented flexible benefit plans while 14 percent plan to do so in the future.

There's also a need for targeted communication of flexible benefits. For example, you should have a communications strategy that helps expecting parents and near-retirees understand the benefits available to them.

Unlimited PTO

There's been a lot of buzz surrounding unlimited vacation or PTO, but in reality, employers have been slow to adopt this benefit. And those who offer it may be phasing it out in 2019.

Dice Insights reports that instead of giving unlimited PTO, employers are offering increased time off for specific reasons such as illness, maternity and paternity leave, or bereavement.

Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved

04/12/2019

Top Reasons Your Employees Are Quitting



According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 3.4 million people—2.3 percent of the total workforce—quit their jobs in November 2018. In the private sector, the quits rate was 2.6 percent, increasing from 2.4 percent the prior year. These numbers reflect a continuous upward trend. The Society for Human Resource Management has noted that the rate has risen every year since 2010, and the last time the voluntary quits rate was this high was April 2001.

The causes of this uprising may vary by company. However, statistically, the following reasons are among the most common.

More Salary, Opportunities for Career Advancement, and Better Benefits

In a 2018 report by Glassdoor, nearly 45 percent of survey respondents cited salary as their main reason for switching jobs. Coming in second and third, respectively, were the desire for career advancement opportunities (32 percent) and better benefits (29 percent).

Employees want competitive pay that reflects their skills, knowledge and experience. Also, they don't just want a job. Instead, they want a career they can advance in—one that enables them to fulfill their professional hopes and dreams. Last, workplaces are becoming increasingly diverse. As a result, employees are seeking flexible benefits that speak to their unique situation rather than a one-size-fits-all approach.

Weak Onboarding Program and Unclear New-Hire Expectations

It's estimated that as many as one in four new hires quits during the first 90 days on the job, and for many, it's because the employer lacks a strong onboarding process.

In a survey conducted by Kronos Inc. and the Human Capital Institute, 76 percent of respondents were not effectively onboarding their new hires, and only 47 percent said their onboarding system successfully retained new hires. Further, 24 percent had no onboarding system at all.

A structured onboarding program is critical to setting the right tone with your new hires and getting them up and running from Day One.

Additionally, per a 2018 study by Jobvite, 43 percent of new hires who quit within the first 90 days did so because the position wasn't what they were expecting. Therefore, it's important to set clear goals and expectations with your new hires from the outset.

Bad Boss

Employees who don't like their boss often dread going to work every day and are therefore likely to make a swift exit. According to a 2018 Randstad US survey, 60 percent of employees have left their job, or are planning to leave, because of a bad boss. Further, 58 percent of employees say they'd "stay at jobs with lower salaries if it meant working for a great boss."

By exhibiting great leadership traits, managers and supervisors can keep good employees from quitting.


Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved.

Local Entertainment And Events Calendar 03/22/2019

Local Entertainment And Events Calendar

Looking for some events in your area?

https://newsletter.homeactions.net/archive/full_article/8673/4019767/1739173/369

Local Entertainment And Events Calendar You’ll always know where the fun’s going on with our interactive local events calendar featuring social sharing, images, videos and ticket links. Click through to see what's happening or to add your own local events.

Signup for Rob Scalia's Newsletter 03/03/2019

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Keep up with Icomp and subscribe to our newsletter!

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02/23/2019

Inclement Weather and Your Payroll Obligations


Hurricanes, storms, tornadoes, blizzards, floods and other weather-related disasters can cause inclement weather closures. But even if one of these calamities causes your business to close, your employees must still be paid on their next regularly scheduled payday if they did any work during the pay period.

To ensure accurate payment, you'll need to take federal and applicable state laws into consideration.

Nonexempt Employees and Inclement Weather

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) says that employers must pay nonexempt employees for all hours worked. Therefore, you do not need to pay these employees for business closures, including those caused by inclement weather. However, if a nonexempt employee shows up and works for two hours before your business closes due to inclement weather, he or she must be paid for two hours for that day.

Under the FLSA, you can require that nonexempt employees use their available paid time off to cover time missed due to inclement weather. However, some states do not allow employers to mandate that employees use their accrued PTO as a substitute in these instances, so be sure to check your state's stance on this issue.

Also, some states have "reporting time" pay laws, which require that employers pay nonexempt employees for a minimum number of hours if they arrive at work as scheduled but are sent home early.

Exempt Employees and Inclement Weather

According to the FLSA, employers must pay exempt employees their full salary for any workweek in which they perform any work. The FLSA permits certain deductions to be made from exempt employees' salaries, but business closures aren't one of them. Therefore, if your business closes for less than one week due to inclement weather, exempt employees must receive their full salary for that week if they did any work at all during that week.

You do not have to pay exempt employees if the business closes for the entire week and they performed no work during that week.

As is the case with nonexempt employees, the FLSA allows you to require that exempt employees use their accrued PTO for inclement weather closings. But, as stated, you'll need to check state law, since not all states allow this substitution.

With regard to exempt employees who have exhausted their PTO, you must still pay them their full salary for the workweek if they do any work during that time. But you don't have to pay them anything if they perform no work for the week and have no available PTO to cover the missed days.

Paychecks don't have to be delayed because of inclement weather

You can't control the weather, but you can take measures to ensure your employees are paid on time when disaster strikes. A large majority of U.S. workers are paid by direct deposit, so making sure paychecks are handed out is moot. Offer this service if you aren't doing so already, and encourage employees to take advantage of it.

Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved.

IcompPayroll | Integrated Compensation Systems, Inc. 02/18/2019

IcompPayroll | Integrated Compensation Systems, Inc.

Who do you know that is looking for help with payroll services? We have an awesome team ready and waiting to connect with you!

http://icomppayroll.com/

IcompPayroll | Integrated Compensation Systems, Inc.

02/14/2019

5 Interview Questions to Steer Clear Of


The Civil Rights Act forbids employers from discriminating against employees and job applicants based on their race, color, s*x, national origin and religion. Asking questions related to those (and other) protected classes may be a blatant violation of the law or, at the very least, could be unethical or unwise. Here are five of these questions.

1. Do you have kids? Or, are you planning to have kids?

Candidates may interpret your questions about children as discrimination based on their s*x, which is a federally protected class. If the candidate is pregnant, questions about kids could easily slip into pregnancy discrimination, which is prohibited by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

2. What's your present or past salary?

Under the Equal Pay Act, it's illegal for employers to pay men and women different wages for the same work because of their s*x. Building on that rule, several states and cities prohibit employers from asking candidates about their salary history — and many other states and localities are considering similar legislation.

A better way to handle salary is to establish a pay range for the job in advance, based on the required skills set, experience and market demands — instead of according to what the candidate previously earned.

3. How old are you?

You have the right to know whether a candidate is at least 18 years of age or the age of majority in your state. But remember that the Age Discrimination in Employment Act prohibits employers from discriminating against individuals age 40 or older. Also, some states have age discrimination laws that protect people who are younger than 40.

4. Do you have any disabilities?

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, you cannot ask any questions that may uncover the existence of a disability before you've made a job offer. Prohibited questions include:

Do you have — or have you ever been treated for — any diseases?
Did you take any sick leave days last year? And if so, how many?
What medications are you currently taking?
Have you ever suffered from drug addiction?
Instead, ask those questions after making the job offer, and make sure you pose those same questions to other candidates who are offered the same type of work — not just to those whose disabilities are obvious. Alternatively, you can explain the essential functions of the job and then ask the candidate whether he or she can perform them.

5. Do you own a car?

According to the Society for Human Resource Management, this question might be discriminatory because the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regards car ownership as financial information — and under federal EEO laws, employers cannot discriminate "when using financial information to make employment decisions."

Unless the job requires the use of a personal vehicle, whether the candidate owns a car is irrelevant.

For more insight into what you can or cannot ask during a job interview, consider speaking with an employment attorney.

Copyright © IndustryNewsletters All rights reserved.

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