Iracom Logistics

Iracom Logistics

Comments

Hey guys! It has already been 72 hours since I'm waiting to get the email for the ICenter. I haven't gotten anything
Happy holidays and merry christmas to everyone and a prosperous new year
I Like

i-RA-COM is one of the fastest growing logistic service providers in North America.

Operating as usual

Container Rates Alert: “Astronomical” Monthly Hike Pushes Long-Term Ocean Freight Rates Up 121% Year-On-Year | Hellenic Shipping News Worldwide 12/01/2021

Container Rates Alert: “Astronomical” Monthly Hike Pushes Long-Term Ocean Freight Rates Up 121% Year-On-Year | Hellenic Shipping News Worldwide

Long-term contracted ocean freight rates rocketed by a further 16.3% over the course of November, consolidating recent gains to leave container shipping costs up 121.2% year-on-year. The latest developments, revealed in the Xeneta Shipping Index (XSI®) Public Indices, stand as the second largest monthly rates rise on record, following a 28.1% jump in July this year, with all major shipping corridors experiencing significant growth. Leading carriers are, as a result, reaping breath-taking financial rewards.
One-sided contest

“When will it end?” comments Patrik Berglund, CEO of Oslo-based Xeneta. “Shippers hoping for some much-needed rates relief have been left punch-drunk by another round of hefty blows to bottom line costs. The continued perfect storm of high demand, maxed-out capacity, port congestion, changing consumer habits, and general supply chain disruption is fuelling a rates explosion that, quite frankly, we’ve never seen the like of.

“What’s more, it’s difficult to see a change of course ahead, with the fundamentals stacked very much in favour of the carrier community. In short, they’ve never had it so good, while many shippers, unfortunately, are well and truly on the ropes.”

Container Rates Alert: “Astronomical” Monthly Hike Pushes Long-Term Ocean Freight Rates Up 121% Year-On-Year | Hellenic Shipping News Worldwide Long-term contracted ocean freight rates rocketed by a further 16.3% over the course of November, consolidating recent gains to leave container shipping costs up 121.2% year-on-year. The latest developments, revealed in the Xeneta Shipping Index (XSI®) Public Indices, stand as the second largest mo...

When Shipping Containers Are Abandoned, the Cargo Becomes a Mystery Prize 11/30/2021

When Shipping Containers Are Abandoned, the Cargo Becomes a Mystery Prize

A mobile crane, its massive gripping arm raised like a scorpion’s tail, rolls up to a multicolored stack of shipping containers at the Pentalver storage yard near Felixstowe, the largest container port in Britain. The machine grabs the top box, backs up with a beep-beep-beep, and sets it down onto the asphalt with a clang. A worker in an orange safety vest kneels and, with a screeching spray of sparks, saws through the numbered steel bolt that seals the latch. The door swings open, and Jake Slinn, a lanky 22-year-old with a buzz cut and thick-rimmed black eyeglasses, steps forward to peer inside.

When Shipping Containers Are Abandoned, the Cargo Becomes a Mystery Prize Supply-chain carnage creates opportunities for companies willing to take a chance on random goods, from cheese to used cars—and maybe even pumpkin seeds.

DSV warns of Chinese New Year supply chain pressure - Air Cargo News 11/29/2021

DSV warns of Chinese New Year supply chain pressure - Air Cargo News

Freight forwarder DSV is telling its customers to plan early for next year’s Chinese New Year holiday as several “extraordinary factors” are expected to put transport operations under extra pressure.

The Denmark-based forwarder said that the Chinese New Year holiday, which this year will start on January 31, typically puts extra pressure on supply chains as factories close for the week while people celebrate the holidays at home with their families.

But DSV said this year that “several extraordinary factors cause a great deal of uncertainty about what the impact of the upcoming Chinese New Year will be” while the company also expects to see “exceptional demand” for transportation of goods in a market “characterized by limited capacity”.

The company pointed out that as well as the usual pre-holiday rush, there are also Covid-19 restrictions, global supply chain congestion, power curbs and the Beijing Winter Olympics.

“The Chinese power curbs – i.e. the electricity rationing which was recently introduced in many parts of China to reduce carbon emissions – are also likely to have a significant impact on production in the coming months,” DSV told customers.

“The extent of the policy varies from province to province, but in some places, the power curbs have resulted in factories cutting output or halting production entirely.

“Although we have seen the situation improving recently, it is not possible to say how things will look in the future.”

On the Winter Olympics, it is currently uncertain what the implications of the event will be as no official Control Policy has been published yet.

DSV warns of Chinese New Year supply chain pressure - Air Cargo News Freight forwarder DSV is telling its customers to plan early for next year's Chinese New Year holiday as several "extraordinary factors" are expected to

The Global Supply Chain Is Finally Unkinking Itself 11/24/2021

The Global Supply Chain Is Finally Unkinking Itself

For months America has been besieged by a crisis of Little Shortages Everywhere, which has threatened everything we hold dear, from pizzas to gaming consoles. Supply-chain nightmares had us shopping for holiday gifts/emotional support toys like the Purple calming toy companion with a dynamic heartbeat and soothing purrs, which I may or may not have ordered for my office desk, in October, for God’s sake.

But ever since that month, Brooke Sutherland has been saying the worst of our national supply-chain nightmare might already be over. We keep getting evidence she’s right. For one thing, though they’re as slow as a container ship stuck in the Suez Canal, global shipping prices are turning in the right direction:

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-11-18/the-global-supply-chain-is-finally-unkinking-itself?utm_content=view&utm_medium=social&cmpid=socialflow-facebook-view&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic&fbclid=IwAR0cS0pLzkIgrXcOg5EAUhlKVULqOtJLH3_llFucfl1U5IoiHPBbZDM4Rmo

The Global Supply Chain Is Finally Unkinking Itself All is not well, but at least it’s not getting any worse.

High freight rates cast a shadow over economic recovery | UNCTAD 11/18/2021

High freight rates cast a shadow over economic recovery | UNCTAD

The recovery of the global economy is threatened by high freight rates, which are likely to continue in the coming months, according to UNCTAD’s Review of Maritime Transport 2021 published on 18 November.

UNCTAD’s analysis shows that the current surge in container freight rates, if sustained, could increase global import price levels by 11% and consumer price levels by 1.5% between now and 2023.

“The current surge in freight rates will have a profound impact on trade and undermine socioeconomic recovery, especially in developing countries, until maritime shipping operations return to normal,” said UNCTAD Secretary General Rebeca Grynspan.

“Returning to normal would entail investing in new solutions, including infrastructure, freight technology and digitalization, and trade facilitation measures,” she said.

What triggered the spike in freight rates and costs?
Demand for goods surged in the second half of 2020 and into 2021, as consumers spent their money on goods rather than services during pandemic lockdowns and restrictions, according to the report. Working from home, online shopping and increased computers sales all placed unprecedented demand on supply chains.

This large swing in containerized trade flows was met with supply-side capacity constraints, including container ship carrying capacity, container shortages, labor shortages, continued on and off COVID-19 restrictions across port regions and congestion at ports.

This mismatch between surging demand and de facto reduced supply capacity then led to record container freight rates on practically all container trade routes.

For example, the Shanghai Containerized Freight Index (SCFI) spot rate on the Shanghai-Europe route was less than $1,000 per TEU in June 2020, jumped to about $4,000 per TEU by the end of 2020, and rose to $7,395 by the end of July 2021. On top of this, cargo owners faced delays, surcharges and other costs, and still encountered difficulties to ensure their containers were moved promptly.

Everyone is affected, but not equally
The impact of the high freight charges will be greater in small island developing states (SIDS), which could see import prices increase by 24% and consumer prices by 7.5%. In least developed countries (LDCs), consumer price levels could increase by 2.2%.

Supply chains will be affected by higher maritime trade costs. Low-value-added items produced in smaller economies, in particular, could face serious erosion of their comparative advantages.

In addition, concerns abound that the sustained higher shipping costs will not only weigh on exports and imports but could also undermine a recovery in global manufacturing.

The report says sustained high rates are already affecting global supply chains, noting that Europe, for example, has been facing shortages of consumer goods imported from Asia such as home furnishings, bicycles, sports goods and toys.

According to the report, a surge in container freight rates will add to production costs, which can raise consumer prices and slow national economies, particularly in SIDS and LDCs, where consumption and production highly depend on trade.

The high rates will also impact on low-value-added items such as furniture, textiles, clothing and leather products, whose production is often fragmented across low-wage economies well away from major consumer markets; the UNCTAD predicts consumer price increases of 10.2% on these.

The analysis further predicts a 9.4% increase in rubber and plastic products, a 7.5% increase for pharmaceutical products and electrical equipment, 6.9% for motor vehicles and 6.4% for machinery and equipment.

The impact of the high freight rates will not be evenly spread, even within Europe, and will be generally greater in smaller economies.

It is suggested that prices would rise by 3.7% in Estonia and 3.9% in Lithuania, compared with 1.2% in the United States and 1.4% in China. This differential also reflects a greater “import openness”, the ratio of imports to GDP, which is typically higher in smaller economies.

Manufacturers in the United States rely mainly on industrial supplies from China and other East Asian economies, so continued cost pressures, disruption and delays in containerized shipping will hinder production, according to the report.

A 10% increase in container freight rates, together with supply chain disruptions, is expected to decrease industrial production in the United States and the euro area by more than 1%, while in China production is expected to decrease by 0.2%.

UNCTAD emphasizes that transport costs are also influenced by structural factors, including port infrastructure quality, the trade facilitation environment and shipping connectivity, and there is potential for significant improvements.

High freight rates cast a shadow over economic recovery | UNCTAD The recovery of the global economy is threatened by high freight rates, which are likely to continue in the coming months, according to UNCTAD’s Review of Maritime Transport 2021 published on 18 November. UNCTAD’s analysis shows that the current surge in container freight rates, if sustained, co...

Placing blame: Trucking industry takes it on chin during supply chain crisis - TheTrucker.com 11/18/2021

Placing blame: Trucking industry takes it on chin during supply chain crisis - TheTrucker.com

Although many in big media — CNN, MSNBC, FOX News, and others — have been pushing the narrative that a trucker shortage is to blame for the supply-chain problem, at least one major national news source is now reporting what trucking industry publications, such as The Trucker, have been writing about all along with Truckers, or a lack of them, are not the primary cause of the clogged supply chain.

People are just buying more. And more. And more.

The Associated Press is reporting that the supply chain, as it is currently configured, simply cannot keep up with the soaring demand.

As previously reported in The Trucker, the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) has continued to shout that a trucker shortage is mostly untrue. Yes, many major carriers are experiencing high turnover rates and are seeking more drivers, OOIDA President Todd Spencer wrote emphatically in an e-mailed statement on the issue, “but let’s be clear, the current supply chain crisis is not due to a shortage of truck drivers!”

“Because the real bottlenecks in the supply chain occur at pickup and delivery points, adding more trucks and drivers will simply makes the lines longer, NOT faster.”

On the counter argument, Chris Spear, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations, has said that the trucking industry is short 80,000 drivers.

https://www.thetrucker.com/trucking-news/the-nation/placing-blame-trucking-industry-takes-it-on-chin-during-supply-chain-crisis?fbclid=IwAR1tIYrd9bU5M4ZnDvPKuj0RT_TIKhuV1qn6GdNtRAzRl_4k-eQW8PvXskY

Placing blame: Trucking industry takes it on chin during supply chain crisis - TheTrucker.com Although many in big media — CNN, MSNBC, FOX News and others — have been pushing the narrative that a trucker shortage is to blame for the supply-chain

F1 freight delays not set to impact Brazil weekend schedule 11/11/2021

F1 freight delays not set to impact Brazil weekend schedule

F1 is currently embarking on its latest triple-header run of races across Mexico, Brazil, and Qatar, posing significant travel distances for staff involved in all three events.

It emerged on Wednesday that some teams were still waiting on freight to arrive in Brazil, impacting their preparations at Interlagos ahead of the Sao Paulo Grand Prix weekend.

Motorsport.com understands that around half the grid is still waiting for freight to get to Brazil, some of which will not arrive until Thursday. It means that some mechanics and team members are set to face working through the night on Thursday to ensure that everything is ready in time for the start of on-track running on Friday.

F1 confirmed to Motorsport.com on Wednesday that inclement weather caused the travel delays, but that it is not expected to have a bearing on the race weekend.

“There were delays in freight departing Mexico on Monday due to the weather conditions, meaning some freight is still to arrive in Brazil,” said a spokesman from F1.

“We expect this to arrive tomorrow with no wider impact on the race weekend.”

The freight delays add another challenge to teams ahead of the third and final grand prix of the season that contains a sprint race as part of its scheduling.

Following the format’s debut at Silverstone and subsequent running at Monza, the third sprint race of the year will take place on Saturday at Interlagos.

It means that as at the previous two events, there is a wider revision of the race weekend schedule, with the traditional qualifying session taking place on Friday from 4pm until 5pm. First practice for the Sao Paulo Grand Prix will start at 12:30pm on Friday.

Following second practice on Saturday afternoon, the 24-lap sprint race will begin at 4:30pm local time in Brazil (7:30pm GMT) to set the final grid for Sunday’s Grand Prix.

https://www.motorsport.com/f1/news/f1-freight-delays-brazil-weekend-schedule/6767355/

F1 freight delays not set to impact Brazil weekend schedule Formula 1 does not expect delays in freight arriving in Brazil to have an impact on the wider race weekend schedule as teams’ preparations come under greater pressure.

Project to fix 'Malfunction Junction' in Columbia for good now underway 11/09/2021

Project to fix 'Malfunction Junction' in Columbia for good now underway

Groundbreaking for the Carolina Crossroad Project (CCP) from the SC Department of Transportation began on Monday.

The project's aim is to rebuild portions of the I-20, I-26, I-126 corridor, also known as the Malfunction Junction.

The highway can take drivers from Columbia to different parts of the state like Spartanburg, Charleston, and Florence. According to SCDOT, 134 thousand vehicles drive on Malfunction Junction, each day.

https://www.wltx.com/article/traffic/groundbreaking-for-malfunction-junction-began-on-monday/101-386eefc8-e096-47df-a84d-4f5ef25f23aa?fbclid=IwAR12zakoK05qB54iRFQoOj9zafbiAppGK1bmZ3u1psdZcAWV79_ins79yMQ

Project to fix 'Malfunction Junction' in Columbia for good now underway More than 134,000 drivers use the I-20, I-26, I-126 corridor daily and now plans are underway to help relieve some of the heavy traffic.

Smaller Ports Pitch for Cargo as California’s Logjams Swell 11/07/2021

Smaller Ports Pitch for Cargo as California’s Logjams Swell

The U.S.’s busiest port complex in southern California has more demand than it can handle — and that’s left smaller hubs along the nation’s coastline angling for some of that business.

After dealing with supply-chain issues of its own over the summer, California’s Port of Oakland is now ready “to be put to use to help shore up” the crisis, its Maritime Director Bryan Brandes said last month. Over in Florida, Governor Ron DeSantis has pitched the state’s 15 seaports as the relief the U.S. needs, saying local harbors “are used to operating around the clock.” And in Texas, Governor Greg Abbott launched an “Escape California” campaign aimed at attracting carriers to the Gulf Coast.

The Los Angeles-Long Beach port complex has been dealing with record-breaking backlogs since the summer that have hardly eased despite ramped-up operations and the involvement of a White House-led task force. The situation has escalated to the point where the twin ports will start fining carriers for letting their containers stay too long at the terminals from Nov. 15.

To be sure, shipping goods to alternative ports has its own supply-chain challenges. When it comes to moving cargo from China to Florida, the extra leg through the Panama Canal can sometimes add over 10 more days to the trip on top of the two weeks it usually takes to ship goods to the West Coast, according to Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Adam Roszkowski.

But with containers piling up and logjams swelling in California’s San Pedro Bay, those extra days would likely even out for cargo destined to the East Coast, Florida Ports Council President Michael Rubin said.

https://gcaptain.com/smaller-ports-pitch-for-cargo-as-californias-logjams-swell/?fbclid=IwAR2mf3ccTkVd-TTEI2mMl085P03YZNCZhc2kHyyqqLjYhX7dcQ8qsDf7-Oc

Smaller Ports Pitch for Cargo as California’s Logjams Swell By Augusta Saraiva (Bloomberg) — The U.S.’s busiest port complex in southern California has more demand than it can handle — and that’s left smaller hubs along the nation’s coastline angling...

Videos (show all)

"Drive-Thru" Back to School Bash

Telephone

Address


6650 Rivers Avenue
Columbia, SC
29406

Other Cargo & Freight in Columbia (show all)
Amarok Security Amarok Security
550 Assembly St,
Columbia, 29201

AMAROK™ offers full-perimeter electric fences, cameras, lights and alarms. Formerly Electric Guard Dog, AMAROK shifted names to reflect its growth and ferociousness. Visit Our Website: www.AMAROK.com

Nml Transport Nml Transport
Columbia, 29135

Hi my name is Dawn Bading I have been involved in rescue, Foster, transport and volunteer work at shelters and rescues alike for over 15 years now.

Jordan River Moving - Columbia, SC Jordan River Moving - Columbia, SC
Columbia, 29201

Whether your move is local or long distance, we will help make your relocation as exciting, rewarding and stress-free as possible.

AMW Elite Logistics , Inc. AMW Elite Logistics , Inc.
136 - 4 Forum Dr #H8
Columbia, 29229

AMW ELITE LOGISTICS INC is a reliable, safe, and secure logistics company specializing in delivering goods and freight across the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

B.O.G Logistics B.O.G Logistics
Columbia, 29045

BOG Logistics LLC is a shipping liaison company that helps companies with origin pickups and destina

Champ’s Logistic, LLC Champ’s Logistic, LLC
P.O Box 290068
Columbia, 29229

Champ’s Logistic, LLC is freight dispatching company that is independently owned and operated by Thomas Odom. We handle the searching and booking of loads, processing all brokerage paperwork, and obtaining Certificates of Insurance.

A1 Freight Trucking Company LLC A1 Freight Trucking Company LLC
9005 Two Notch Road Ste 37
Columbia, 29223

We are a locally-owned trucking company that specialize in moving goods and general freight worldwide. We are currently seeking owner-operators with own authority to assist with moving these unlimited loads!!!

Speedy Pak Logistics Speedy Pak Logistics
Columbia, 29203

NEXT DAY DELIVERY COLUMBIA/MYRTLE BEACH

SC Council on Competitiveness SC Council on Competitiveness
1411 Gervais St, Ste 450
Columbia, 29201

SC Council on Competitiveness is advancing the long-term economic competitiveness of South Carolina, our industries and our citizens.

ASAP Expediting & Logistics ASAP Expediting & Logistics
100 Commerce Dr NE
Columbia, 29223

We are dedicated to customer satisfaction without sacrificing quality of service. We strive to exceed our customer's expectations every day all day!

DP Preferred Truck Lines, LLC DP Preferred Truck Lines, LLC
Columbia

Duane Peay CEO/Operator Tanisha Peay COO

Modular Access Systems, LLC Modular Access Systems, LLC
Columbia, 29209

Modular Access Systems, LLC services your unloading and loading rack needs, supplying the most cost effective fall protection for your loading racks. Experience has proven the best loading and unloading access equipment must provide fall protection.