Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston

Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston

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Look forward to seeing Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston at Aurora Fossil Museum 2022 NC Fossil Festival May 28-29 in Aurora, NC . . . SEE LINK
Hey, y'all. My cousin found this on one of the SC beaches, posted it on FB, and asked if anyone thought it was a shark's tooth. Can you tell me what it is?
Check out this great post about giant beavers from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston. Giant beaver fossil sites can be found all across North America, including Beringia. These extinct rodents lived here during the warm interglacial periods of the Ice Age. Emerging research suggests that they ate pondweed and behaved more like modern muskrats.

Next time you visit the Beringia Centre, make sure you check out our giant beaver replica on the path from the parking lot to the Centre. You'll be amazed with how large they really were!
awesome
CofC’s first-ever Paleontology Scholarship is being funded by a donation box in the Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston.
Earlier this week, Clyde helped Baylin Bible prep fossils for display in the Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston. Baylin is a sophomore pursuing a General Studies major and College of Charleston Geology Department minor.
Dr. Scott Persons set up a new specimen in the SSMB atrium. The skeleton belonged to a pampathere - an Ice Age relative of armadillos. A million years ago, these beasts crawled across prehistoric Charleston.

Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston
Hello! Can you tell me any more info on this tooth? We initially thought Carcharoides caticus but then Skye noticed the serrations making us lean towards Carcharoides serratus. Found in Ladson earlier this week.
Hone et al. at Queen Mary University of London and Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston present new data on tail lengths and variation along the caudal series in the non-avialan #dinosaurs
Read the full @PeerJLife article https://bit.ly/3aqsPkR
#Anatomy #Dinosauria #Vertebrae
New donor alert! Marta Diaz has generously pledged $10,000 to support student workers in the Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston. Join us in thanking Marta for this incredible gift! #CofCDAY College of Charleston Geology Department
What will this huge recent find dinosaur look like or not known yet , too early ?

Highlighting fossils of late Cretaceous through Pleistocene from the southeastern USA. Natural History Museum

The Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences is home to a Paleontology Museum that displays almost 1,000 fossils.

The displays includes: dinosaur bones, crinoids, Oligocene mammals of North America, mosasaurs, cave bears, Pleistocene mammals of the Carolinas, ocean life through time and fossil plants. A favorite exhibit for many is the reconstructed jaw which houses real teeth from the giant extinct shark Megalodon. The Museum is open to the public and manned by geology undergraduates who work as student doce

Operating as usual

05/02/2022

#MolluscMonday
Perisphinctes sp. was an ammonite found nearly world-wide and hails from the mid to late Jurassic period. It is an important index fossil; this means it is used for biostratigraphy, as they lived for a short period during the Jurassic. This helps scientists to pinpoint a time when a fossil was alive, along with other fossils found in the same layer of rock.
Ammonites may look similar to modern day nautilus, but are actually more closely related to squids, octopuses, and cuttlefish. Their spiraled shells were chambered, and only the last and largest chamber housed the animal! These chambers, separated by ‘septa’ provided structural support for the shell, keeping the animal from being crushed by intense water pressures at depth.

#ammonite #ammonites #ammonoid #mollusc #mollusk #mollusca #cephalopod #cephalopoda #nautilus #fossil #fossils #paleo #paleontology #invertebrate #invertebratepaleontology #invertpaleo #biostratigraphy #indexfossil #jurassic

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 05/01/2022

We had a great time yesterday at the #EasterMegHunt organized and hosted by Ashby Gale and Charleston Fossil Adventures, LLC out at Folly Beach! We identified quite a few fossils for some of the kids who scrambled through the plots of sand. Here's one of the winners, holding up a nice C. megalodon tooth!

See you there next year!

#fossil #fossils #megalodon #shark #sharks #sharkteeth #beachcombing #follybeachsc #follybeach #lowcountryfossils

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 04/30/2022

We'll be out at Folly Beach on this beautiful Saturday with an outreach table for the one and only Easter Meg Hunt with Charleston Fossil Adventures, LLC - first time since before the pandemic! We'll be out in front of Loggerheads (123 West Ashley Ave) from 11am-2pm. Whether you're on Folly for the hunt proper or out there to enjoy the beach or go on your own hunt, swing by us! Bring any unidentified fossils along with you for us to take a look at.

04/29/2022

Your moment of Zen: a Pleistocene tapir molar in a sand pool at Folly Beach SC

#FossilFriday your moment of Zen - an ice age tapir molar (Tapirus sp.) we found in a sandy pool out at Folly Beach yesterday as the tide was going out. A small fish came to inspect it as well!

#fossil #fossils #mammal #iceage #paleo #paleontology #landmamal #pleistocene #follybeach #follybeachsc #lowcountryfossils

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 04/28/2022

We had a great time Tuesday evening doing a STEAM outreach event with River Oaks Middle! Lots of great interactions with kids learning all about how animals look different when it's only their bones (and matching the picture to the skulls) and also all about different dinosaurs! Huge thanks for having us, we'd love to do it again!

04/27/2022

#WorldTapirDay

Maxilla (hard palate) of the extinct tapir Tapirus veroensis from the Pleistocene of Florida. Like modern tapirs, this animal would have had a prehensile proboscis - similar to an elephant’s trunk - which aided in grabbing vegetation. Tapirus veroensis was larger than modern day tapirs, and went extinct about 11,000 years ago. Tapirs are odd-toed ungulates - meaning that they have a large central toe rather than paired toes. This places them within the Perissodactla - the group of mammals including rhinos and horses! That’s right - tapirs are the closest living relatives of rhinos! The first true tapirs evolved in the Oligocene (the same time many of our cetacean fossils are from) and first evolved in North America before migrating into South America during the Great American Interchange. Have you ever found any tapir teeth when out fossil hunting? Share your pictures of your finds in the comments below!

#tapir #pleistocenemammals #pleistocenemegafauna #pleistocene #iceagemegafauna #iceage #evolution #extinction #extinct #paleontology #paleo #Florida #floridafossils

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 04/26/2022

#toothtuesday The weather is nice and folks are out on the beaches - here are some finds made by our scientists recently, and friend of the museum Ashby Gale - what have you found recently?

top - Carcharocles megalodon, megatoothed shark
lower left - Isurus oxyrhinchus, shortfin mako
lower center - Parotodus benedeni, false mako
lower right - Alopias grandis, giant thresher shark

#fossil #fossils #shark #sharks #paleo #paleontology #sharkteeth #fossilsharkteeth #beachcombing #beachcomber #charleston #charlestonsc #lowcountryfossils #paleoichthyology

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 04/25/2022

#mastodonmonday Closeup of the molar of the Goose Creek mastodon - a specimen of Mammut americanum from our collections, probably middle or late Pleistocene in age. The brown spots are areas that have been worn away from chewing - the American mastodon was a browser, eating food from trees rather than grasses like mammoths.

You can check out a 3D model of this specimen online for free here: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/goose-creek-mastodon-mandible-70a64f9c46f74903a8a529b57b8afd58

#fossil #fossils #paleo #paleontology #mastodon #americanmastodon #mammut #mammutamericanum #mammoth #mammoths #elephant #iceage #pleistocene #lowcountryfossils

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 04/24/2022

That's not garbage - it's a "sand collar"! It's spring, and that means it's breeding season not just for birds and plants (all that pollen!), but also marine invertebrates. Sand collars are small circular leaf-like structures consisting of eggs and sand glued together by shark eye snails (Neverita duplicata) and left partly buried in beach sand in the intertidal or subtidal zone. You might come across these at low tide - don't dig them out, though it does sort of look like a buried plastic bottle. The second/third photos show an example we found (already eroded out) that had eggs of two different additional snail species on them - other gastropods like to lay their eggs on hard surfaces (rocks, empty shells), which this might provide!

#beachcombing #snail #seasnail #sharkeye #sandcollar #beach #tide #lowtide #beachbum #lowcountryscience #intertidal #marinebio #marinebiology

04/23/2022

A nice whale molar from upper Eocene limestones of Harleyville, South Carolina: this specimen is the upper 1st or 2nd molar of a very large basilosaurid whale - possibly Basilosaurus or Cynthiacetus. Basilosaurid whales still had a lot of evolving to do - modern dolphins just have conical, single rooted teeth!

#eocene #whale #whales #whaleontology #paleo #fossil #paleontology #archaeocete #basilosaurid #basilosaurus #cynthiacetus #lowcountryfossils #lowcountrypaleontology #charleston #harleyville #cenozoic #fossils

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 04/22/2022

#fossilfriday #earthday A nice mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus... sometimes called I. desori) tooth found earlier this week along Charleston harbor. The tooth is encrusted with bryozoans on one side.

Go outside and get some sun today for Earth Day - find some fossils! Find some critters! Pick up some litter! And share photos if you do!
#fossil #fossils #paleo #paleontology #earth #science #paleoichthyology #lowcountryfossils

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 04/21/2022

A fantastic, huge new study describes much of the fossil shark and ray record from Florida. This new study by our colleague Victor Perez takes a deep dive into the quality of the shark/ray fossil record and what we can glean from it. Perez found that the shark fossil record, represented by 100,000 specimens at the Florida Museum of Natural History, was affected by sampling problems - smaller teeth were often undersampled from many rock units.

Despite these biases, one of Perez' most major findings is that the shark fauna in the North Atlantic switched from a mackerel shark (lamniform) dominated fauna (typically with common sand tigers and closely related species) to a 'reef/tiger shark' (carcharhiniform) dominated fauna about 34 million years ago (late Eocene) - an event associated with a global glaciation. Many lineages of sharks that survived the extinction possessed adaptations for preying/scavenging on marine mammals.

Congratulations to our colleague Victor on getting this research published!

The new paper can be read here - it is open access, meaning that there is no charge to read it!
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/paleobiology/article/chondrichthyan-fossil-record-of-the-florida-platform-eocenepleistocene/2835CCEC27DC8EE0B24A5B62B1416618

#fossil #fossils #paleo #paleontology #paleoichthyology #shark #sharks #sharksandrays #stingray #batray #eagleray #fish #fishes #fossilfish #sharkteeth #cenozoic #florida #floridafossils

College of Charleston professor, alum claim new Tyrannosaurus species in paper 04/19/2022

College of Charleston professor, alum claim new Tyrannosaurus species in paper

#TyrannosaurusTuesday
Today, our curator, Dr. Scott Persons, along with paleontologist Greg Paul and former CofC student Jay Van Raalte, announce the results of stratigraphic and anatomical analyses of all known Tyrannosaurus skeletons. Statistical support is found for three (not just one) species. Say hello to the tyrant lizard king, emperor, and queen! Today’s Post & Courier has an article about the recent paper, read it here! https://www.postandcourier.com/environment/college-of-charleston-professor-alum-claim-new-tyrannosaurus-species-in-paper/article_541ed6e0-bc08-11ec-96f9-63e725dde70f.html
#dino #dinosaur #trex #tyrannosaurusrex #tyrannosaurus #paleo #paleontology #cretaceous #mesozoic #jurassicpark #jurassicworld #hellcreek #rexit

College of Charleston professor, alum claim new Tyrannosaurus species in paper Three researchers, including two associated with the College of Charleston, say three species of Tyrannosaurus could have existed, a claim that has stirred debate in the science world.

04/18/2022

#molluskmonday Ever heard of a fossil called a “turtle head”? They’re commonly found in the Myrtle Beach area, and aren’t actually the “preserved heads” of turtles (whole heads don’t really fossilize) - as a matter of fact, they don’t even remotely resemble turtle skulls. They are actually what’s called an “internal mold” of a type of clam from the Cretaceous period named Cucullaea - the genus is still around today, called the ‘false ark clams’. How do these form?

1) The clam gets buried, and sand fills in the inside of the shell (top left).
2) if the conditions are right, the mud inside the clam will harden with the mineral calcium phosphate - turning the mud inside into rock, and making it dark brown, gray, or black (top right).
3) When calcium phosphate is deposited, it tends to happen when groundwater is acidic - which results in the shell being dissolved away (lower left).
4) At a later time, the phosphatized mold is eroded out, and the shell is now gone (lower right).

It may now be mixed with fossils from the same time period and other time periods depending upon how much erosion takes place. These molds were named “steinkerns” by early geologists in Germany - which translates to “stone core”. Many mollusks can form internal molds, and along our waterways and beaches you can find molds of closed clams, open clams, or even just one half of a clam shell - and also molds of sea snails and small corals.
#shell #shells #fossil #fossils #bivalve #bivalves #mollusk #mollusc #clam #clams #cockle #invertebrate #invertebratepaleontology #geology #taphonomy #steinkern #turtlehead #cretaceous #peedeeformation #myrtlebeach #myrtlebeachsc #lowcountryfossils

Photos from Mace Brown Museum of Natural History at the College of Charleston's post 04/17/2022

🐰 Hoppy Easter to those that celebrate! 🐰
Did you know bunnies have been around since the Eocene? Rabbits and hares belong to the family Leporidae which first evolved some 53 million years ago. Bunnies like this Palaeolagus haydeni lived during the Oligocene - this particular fossil is from the Brule Formation in Wyoming. We wouldn’t recommend eating any candy left by this guy - it would be ~32 million years old, and likely quite stale!
#happyeaster #easter #eastersunday #rabbit #bunny #leporidae #fossil #fossils #paleo #paleontology #mammal #evolution #mammalevolution #extinct #extinction #oligocene #bruleformation

Videos (show all)

Your moment of Zen: a Pleistocene tapir molar in a sand pool at Folly Beach SC
Dark and stormy night at the museum
Chiseling some Eocene limestone to check for whale bones
Fantastic dolphin sighting on lowcountry river
National Fossil Day
Dating the extinction of Carcharocles megalodon

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