Flourish Psychotherapy & Nutrition

Our flourish! brand holds mindful wellness and affordability at the center of our psychotherapy and nutrition services.

Operating as usual

Photos from Flourish Psychotherapy & Nutrition's post 10/07/2021

Today we’re sharing 5 nutritional pillars to improve mental health, inspired by Dr. Uma Naidoo’s post: https://umanaidoomd.com/6-pillars-of-nutritional-psychiatry/

Eat WHOLE foods - ‘Whole Foods’ means vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, legumes, protein and some whole grains, not the supermarket. Ensure 80% of your plate has lots of veggies, then nuts, seeds, protein, legumes and possibly gluten-free grains and allow yourself 20% for flexibility. You’ll get more healthy fiber this way and lessen inflammatory agents (like sugar, chemical additives, seed oils) that can negatively impact the brain and mood.

The Greener, The Better - Dark leafy greens are fantastic for your brain and mood but you need more than just spinach. Diversify and amplify the quantity of greens and include swiss chard, romaine, arugula, collard greens and dandelion greens; they are an excellent source for folate, an essential nutrient for healthy neurotransmitters like serotonin. Consuming foods with folate has been associated with increased cognitive functioning and a decrease in feeling hopeless.

Eat the Rainbow and Diversify Food Choices - Colorful and diverse foods are not only pleasing to the eye but the different molecules in the varying food groups and colors offer nutrients that can boost brain function, lower inflammation and improve your mood. A diverse and colorful meal would look like a salad with different dark leafy greens, red radishes, yellow bell peppers, purple cabbage, carrots, tomatoes, chickpeas with walnuts, h**p seeds and grilled wild-caught salmon.

Mindful Eating - When we can be mindful of how food makes us feel after the meal we not only cultivate mindfulness but we strengthen our connection to our bodies and the signals it is giving us. Being mindful of bloating, nausea, fatigue, aches or a run for the toilet within an hour after eating can let you know which foods you could try to avoid. If you feel light, clear-headed and satiated after a meal then you know you hit all the right foods for your body and mood.

Take Your Time To Build Sustainable Diet Changes -
We know it is VERY hard to make the changes above. Please have compassion and take your time to slowly shift away from processed / junk / fast foods and into preparing meals with lots of fresh vegetables and clean protein and fats. Allow yourself the space to take as much time as you need to achieve sustainable eating habits that improve your mood, energy, brain function, sleep and overall well-being. If you feel overwhelmed or confused, reach out to a functional nutritionist like Angela Nash at Flourish for guidance and support.

#functionalnutrition #gutbrainconnection

10/05/2021

What does it mean to love yourself?

"Self-love" is a term we hear all the time. Yet, few of us know what that really looks like.

The ability to love oneself seems to be thought of as an intrinsic quality. One that is bestowed upon children by their assumably well-adjusted, self-loving parents.

Self-love is an action, not a state of feeling good.

Self-love is important to living well. It influences:
~ your perception of the world
~ how you treat others
~ who you pick for a partner
~ how you cope with problems
~ your motivation to discover your purpose

It is a state of appreciation for oneself that grows when we engage in *repetitive* behavior that supports our physical and psychological growth.

Here are 5 ways to cultivate self-love:

* Practice mindfulness
Get familiar with what you feel, think, and want out of life. Act in ways that are aligned with your values—not what others want.

* Prioritize self-care
Take care of your physical body, your mind, and your spirit. Nourish yourself daily through hydrating, eating nutrient-dense foods, moving your body, getting proper sleep, and cultivating meaningful relationships.

* Set boundaries
It’s ok to say ‘no’, even when it comes to helping others if it occurs at the expense of yourself. It’s your job to protect YOU.

* Forgive yourself and others
You can take responsibility for your actions without punishing yourself when you make a mistake. See them as learning experiences, and begin to accept your imperfections.

* Live with intention
If your intention is to live a meaningful and healthy life, you will make decisions that support this intention, and feel good about yourself when you succeed.

We also want to acknowledge that self-love can be more challenging than simply following a checklist. Therapy can provide a space where folks feel loved and accepted, and can help uncover possible reasons why it may be difficult for someone to practice self-love.

#selflovematters #AustinTherapist #austintherapy #austinmentalhealth

What does it mean to love yourself?

"Self-love" is a term we hear all the time. Yet, few of us know what that really looks like.

The ability to love oneself seems to be thought of as an intrinsic quality. One that is bestowed upon children by their assumably well-adjusted, self-loving parents.

Self-love is an action, not a state of feeling good.

Self-love is important to living well. It influences:
~ your perception of the world
~ how you treat others
~ who you pick for a partner
~ how you cope with problems
~ your motivation to discover your purpose

It is a state of appreciation for oneself that grows when we engage in *repetitive* behavior that supports our physical and psychological growth.

Here are 5 ways to cultivate self-love:

* Practice mindfulness
Get familiar with what you feel, think, and want out of life. Act in ways that are aligned with your values—not what others want.

* Prioritize self-care
Take care of your physical body, your mind, and your spirit. Nourish yourself daily through hydrating, eating nutrient-dense foods, moving your body, getting proper sleep, and cultivating meaningful relationships.

* Set boundaries
It’s ok to say ‘no’, even when it comes to helping others if it occurs at the expense of yourself. It’s your job to protect YOU.

* Forgive yourself and others
You can take responsibility for your actions without punishing yourself when you make a mistake. See them as learning experiences, and begin to accept your imperfections.

* Live with intention
If your intention is to live a meaningful and healthy life, you will make decisions that support this intention, and feel good about yourself when you succeed.

We also want to acknowledge that self-love can be more challenging than simply following a checklist. Therapy can provide a space where folks feel loved and accepted, and can help uncover possible reasons why it may be difficult for someone to practice self-love.

#selflovematters #AustinTherapist #austintherapy #austinmentalhealth

09/30/2021

Sharing the newest meta-analysis of research connecting the composition of the gut’s microbiome to major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, anxiety, and schizophrenia. This pivotal meta-analysis reviewed 59 studies showed a consistent pattern of association between a depletion of good bacteria, the overabundance of pro-inflammatory bacteria within the gut, and depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

This research is exciting to us at Flourish! because it validates our whole-body and gut-brain approach to mental health. This research also pokes holes in the pharmaceutical marketing myth that disorders like depression stem from ‘a chemical imbalance’.

Since most of our serotonin is made in our guts, along with portions of other neurotransmitters that influence brain and mood function, it makes sense to focus research and treatment on the gut, especially here in the U.S. because the standard American diet ensures our guts will never be healthy.

Fast foods, sugar, trans-fats, and processed prepared foods (think anything that comes in a box or bag) contain ingredients that create and/or exacerbate gut inflammation. Also, these foods have little fiber in them which means the good bacteria don’t have what they need to multiply and balance out the bad guys.

While changing our diets can help immensely to shift depression, anxiety, and mood disorders there is still some healing that needs to be done. For example, certain foods and supplements like specific probiotics, prebiotics, and gut repairing / detoxing protocols will be necessary in order to heal and produce a rich, diversified microbiome.

We have several clinicians at Flourish! that specialize in gut health to improve mental health. We offer gut health assessments, optional testing, individualized nutrition, and supplement protocols uniquely tailored to each individual's needs. We also collaborate with integrative medical professionals when we feel it is necessary to bring in next-level care.

Has your mood, brain functioning, or energy improved after changing what you eat? Please let us know your experience!

The meta-analysis “Perturbations in Gut Microbiota Composition in Psychiatric Disorders” was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on September 15, 2021.

You can read the full article here:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/article-abstract/2784328

#gutbrainconnection #mindbodyconnection #holisticmentalhealth

Sharing the newest meta-analysis of research connecting the composition of the gut’s microbiome to major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, anxiety, and schizophrenia. This pivotal meta-analysis reviewed 59 studies showed a consistent pattern of association between a depletion of good bacteria, the overabundance of pro-inflammatory bacteria within the gut, and depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

This research is exciting to us at Flourish! because it validates our whole-body and gut-brain approach to mental health. This research also pokes holes in the pharmaceutical marketing myth that disorders like depression stem from ‘a chemical imbalance’.

Since most of our serotonin is made in our guts, along with portions of other neurotransmitters that influence brain and mood function, it makes sense to focus research and treatment on the gut, especially here in the U.S. because the standard American diet ensures our guts will never be healthy.

Fast foods, sugar, trans-fats, and processed prepared foods (think anything that comes in a box or bag) contain ingredients that create and/or exacerbate gut inflammation. Also, these foods have little fiber in them which means the good bacteria don’t have what they need to multiply and balance out the bad guys.

While changing our diets can help immensely to shift depression, anxiety, and mood disorders there is still some healing that needs to be done. For example, certain foods and supplements like specific probiotics, prebiotics, and gut repairing / detoxing protocols will be necessary in order to heal and produce a rich, diversified microbiome.

We have several clinicians at Flourish! that specialize in gut health to improve mental health. We offer gut health assessments, optional testing, individualized nutrition, and supplement protocols uniquely tailored to each individual's needs. We also collaborate with integrative medical professionals when we feel it is necessary to bring in next-level care.

Has your mood, brain functioning, or energy improved after changing what you eat? Please let us know your experience!

The meta-analysis “Perturbations in Gut Microbiota Composition in Psychiatric Disorders” was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on September 15, 2021.

You can read the full article here:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/article-abstract/2784328

#gutbrainconnection #mindbodyconnection #holisticmentalhealth

Photos from Flourish Psychotherapy & Nutrition's post 09/27/2021

Today we’re sharing a favorite recipe from Mark Hyman, MD: Sweet Potato Curry with Chickpeas. This fiber-rich dish is a delicious meal to add to your rotation as we transition into cooler months.

Below are some of the nutritional benefits from the curry:

🍠 Sweet potatoes are rich in beta-carotene, a plant-based compound that is converted to vitamin A in your body. Vitamin A is essential to immune system health. It’s also key for maintaining healthy mucous membranes, especially in the lining of your gut.

🍃 Spinach contains vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin K1 (which is essential for blood clotting). Spinach is also an excellent source of iron, folate, and calcium. It is also one of the richest sources of quercetin, which is an antioxidant that wards off infection, inflammation, and helps with nutrient absorption.

🥕 Carrots are high in vitamin A and vitamin K1. vitamin B6, biotin, and potassium. Carrots contain soluble fiber, which can lower blood sugar and feeds friendly bacteria in your gut. They also contain insoluble fiber, which can help with bowel movement regularity. Carrots are high in antioxidants that improve immune function.

🧅 Red onions are a good source of prebiotics, which aid in digestion and microbiome diversity. They are high in vitamin C and B vitamins.

💛 Chickpeas are high in fiber and protein, which slows digestion, promotes fullness and helps with blood sugar regulation.

💚 Celery is rich in antioxidants, including phytonutrients, which have been shown to reduce inflammation in the body.

You can find the full recipe on Mark Hyman’s website here:
https://drhyman.com/blog/2018/04/03/sweet-potato-curry-with-chickpeas/

#nutritiousanddelicious #fallrecipes

09/23/2021

The pursuit of happiness can be exhausting; so many books to read, lists to make, activities to try, places to visit, and relationships to explore.

Mindfulness can help by making happiness show up in an easy and invigorating way.

When we slow down, pause, and connect with beauty in the present moment the warm feeling of joy we experience for a few seconds can stay with us for hours and cultivates happiness.

Turning towards the beauty of a rustling tree outside our window, a bird singing a short tune, a caring mother gently helping her toddler up the steps, or two pups greeting each other on a walk in their neighborhood can deposit seeds of happiness in the form of joy.

Author Jane Anne Staw calls this ‘practicing small’ and found she could turn off the faucet of her anxiety by savoring the ordinary and acknowledging moments of kindness. This is mindfulness as its simplest. Ms. Staw discovered the more she slowed down and took in moments of joy that were occurring right in front of her moving past negative thought patterns was easier and her days felt lighter.

Did you turn towards beauty today? What did you find?

#mindfulness #MomentsOfJoy #anxietyrelief

The pursuit of happiness can be exhausting; so many books to read, lists to make, activities to try, places to visit, and relationships to explore.

Mindfulness can help by making happiness show up in an easy and invigorating way.

When we slow down, pause, and connect with beauty in the present moment the warm feeling of joy we experience for a few seconds can stay with us for hours and cultivates happiness.

Turning towards the beauty of a rustling tree outside our window, a bird singing a short tune, a caring mother gently helping her toddler up the steps, or two pups greeting each other on a walk in their neighborhood can deposit seeds of happiness in the form of joy.

Author Jane Anne Staw calls this ‘practicing small’ and found she could turn off the faucet of her anxiety by savoring the ordinary and acknowledging moments of kindness. This is mindfulness as its simplest. Ms. Staw discovered the more she slowed down and took in moments of joy that were occurring right in front of her moving past negative thought patterns was easier and her days felt lighter.

Did you turn towards beauty today? What did you find?

#mindfulness #MomentsOfJoy #anxietyrelief

Photos from Flourish Psychotherapy & Nutrition's post 09/21/2021

Many people that come through Flourish with chronic anxiety believe the narrative that their brain is broken, malfunctioning, has a chemical imbalance, or that they are just born worriers. Some have tried prescribed medications, therapy, substances (legal and illicit) to tame, control and/or stop the constant anxiousness but find only short-term relief.

Our approach is different than conventional treatment in that we ask these folks to shift their perspective - we help them to understand how worry and anxiety are fueled by the signals in the body, not the brain. When we make this shift to the body instead of the brain it makes sense that conventional treatments like Xanax or cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) would not be able to offer sustainable efficacy and relief.

Stephen Porges, PhD spent decades researching how the body and brain talk to each other, how our nervous systems influence our thought patterns and how social interaction can help calm the nervous system. He developed the polyvagal theory from this research. In short, the theory weaves together the connection of messages between the body and brain, between us and another being (social engagement), and the implications of these messages traveling via an internal information superhighway called the vagus nerve.

If we get mindful and curious about our worrying thoughts and apply the concepts of the Polyvagal Theory, we will most likely discover feelings of discomfort or tension in our bodies such as tightness in the chest or throat, tension in the neck and shoulders, or nauseousness in the belly. The distress occurring in your body happens first and the worrying thoughts follow.
Polyvagal Theory crushes the conventional psychiatric approach to worry and anxiety by finding the body’s autonomic nervous system creates signal(s) of danger or safety within your body first and thoughts, narratives, stories will follow in accordance with a state of danger or safety.

Part two of this series will dive into how mindfulness, breath, curiosity, and social interaction can calm worry and anxiety.

#polyvagaltheory #vagusnerve #stephenporges #anxietyrelief

Mindful Psychotherapy, Nutrition and Non-Pharmaceutical Treatment for Anxiety, Depression & Mood Disorders

Flourish Psychotherapy and Nutrition, LLC was formed to create a mindfulness-based services business for the curious and eclectic Austin, Texas community.

Our flourish! brand holds mindful wellness at the center of psychotherapy and nutrition services. Our supportive and affordable offerings for individual mindful wellness are processing and support groups, meditation and cooking classes as well as periodic workshops for more in-depth engagement with meditation, cooking and nutrition, and integrative sound therapy. We acknowledge that the ability to be in the present moment, without judgment or attachment to a particular outcome, is key to connecting with our humanity and well-being but will require a wide breadth of support to get there.

All of our practitioners weave tenets of mindfulness into their practice with clients as we believe when we are truly present with you during sessions and consultations then we can become a trusted source for empathy, compassion and guidance.

Our practitioners offer individual and group sessions, nutritional wellness consultations and assessments, individualized and structured nutritional and lifestyle programs, mindfulness workshops, as well as classes on developing mindfulness skills, meditation and cooking.

Videos (show all)

Integrative Psychotherapy - NextQuest Podcast
Group Nutrition Classes with Functional Nutritionist Angela Nash
meditation_social
Intro Food Mood
mozart_flourish_social_square
pluto
MINDBODYRADIO_CLIP

Telephone

Website

flourishinaustin.com

Address


4361 S Congress Ave # 102
Austin, TX
78745

Opening Hours

Tuesday 12pm - 8pm
Wednesday 12pm - 8pm
Thursday 12pm - 9pm
Saturday 9:30am - 2pm
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