Strong HOLD AID Foundation

Community Development, Rural Association and Farming SHAF seeks to foster the development of the indigenous people in the community through advocating for child rights, health and implementation of policies geared towards assisting the indigenous people.

worldvisionmagazine.org 02/03/2015

Ebola survivor brings dignity to child burial | World Vision

worldvisionmagazine.org The virus has taken her husband, sister, and another close relative during its nine-month rampage through Sierra Leone. Ebola struck her as well, but she survived.

trust.org 28/12/2014

Children maimed, r***d, tortured, killed in 2014 - UN

trust.org UNICEF declares 2014 a devastating year for children, saying 230 mln children live in countries and regions affected by armed conflict

gov.za 05/11/2014

Page not found | South African Government

What South Africa is doin on Ebola Response

Ebola

We are fully aware of the severity of Ebola crisis and continue to monitor the situation, WHO guidelines and measures taken by the South African government on a daily basis. Please see below the latest information regarding the status of Ebola in South Africa and the precautions taken to protect visitors. We will be keeping close watch and will update this site with any further information.

Measures taken by the Government of South Africa

As South Africa does not share a border with any affected country, the risk of Ebola spreading there is low. No case of Ebola has been confirmed so far in South Africa.

However the South African government has taken measures to prevent it spreading to the country:

All travellers and crew members arriving into South African Points of Entry must have completed a Travel Health questionnaire upon arrival. If found to have any of the symptoms or signs suggestive of Ebola, they will be referred to one of the designated hospitals for further investigations and management.
Non-South African citizens arriving from Ebola-affected areas of West Africa will not be allowed into the country, with borders closed to people from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone; South African nationals will be allowed to re-enter the country when returning from high-risk countries, but will undergo strict screening.
Passengers who travelled from or through Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone within the last month of arrival into South Africa must undergo additional screening at the Points of Entry.
All non-essential outgoing travel to the affected countries has been banned; travellers wishing to go to the affected areas have to apply for authorisation with the South African government
Increased surveillance has been set up at ports of entry: Tambo and Lanseria international airports in Johannesburg have had thermal scanners installed to monitor the temperatures of all people entering the country, and 270 health officials working at nine high-risk ports of entry have been trained; port health services, and public and private healthcare practitioners, have been put on high alert for any ill person who has travelled to Ebola risk areas.
The government has set up outbreak response teams in all provinces, while 25 healthcare workers have been trained on the Ebola virus disease in each of the 51 municipal districts; the national department of health also holds teleconferences with provinces every week to discuss the situation on the ground.
The cabinet has approved R32.5 million (US$2.9million) to support South Africa’s preparedness and response activities
For more information on the South African Government’s response please read http://www.gov.za/speeches/view.php?sid=47819

gov.za Sorry, the page you requested could not be found. We have recently migrated our website to a new system and the location of a few pages have shifted. Use the search in the top navigation or return to the Home page.

27/10/2014

Weekly Address: Focused on the Fight Against Ebola

In this week’s address, the President discusses the measures we are taking to respond to Ebola cases at home, while containing the epidemic at its source in ...

usaid.gov 27/10/2014

Fighting Ebola: A Grand Challenge for Development  | U.S. Agency for International Development

usaid.gov USAID is partnering with the White House Office of Science and Technology, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and The Department of Defense to launch Fighting Ebola: A Grand Challenge for Development to help health care workers on the front lines provide better care and stop the spread…

cnn.com 01/10/2014

Woman saves three relatives from Ebola

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cnn.com 01/10/2014

No contact: Life inside the Ebola outbreak

Incredible Stories. You must read.

cnn.com The hospital gatekeeper. The contact tracer. The burial leader. Learn what it's like inside the Ebola outbreak from people in West Africa.

cnn.com 01/10/2014

The reason Ebola isn't being stopped

cnn.com Contact tracing works only if you have a list of victims' contacts and their addresses. The system in West Africa for the Ebola outbreak is "in shambles."

cnn.com 01/10/2014

Blair: 3 ways to help Africa beat Ebola

cnn.com Ebola could become the biggest humanitarian disaster in a generation, writes former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

aljazeera.com 01/10/2014

UN raises alert over neglected Ebola orphans

aljazeera.com Ebola outbreak has left at least 3,700 children in the hands of relatives who are too frightened to take care of them.

aljazeera.com 01/10/2014

First Ebola case diagnosed on US soil

aljazeera.com Patient who recently returned from Liberia tested positive at a hospital in Dallas, Texas, health officials say.

19/09/2014

The Limitations of Medical Science
Other reasons why infectious diseases are making a comeback relate to medical science itself. Many bacteria now defy antibiotics that once killed them. Ironically, antibiotics themselves have helped to create this situation. For example, if an antibiotic kills only 99 percent of the harmful bacteria in an infected person, the surviving one percent that resisted the antibiotic can now grow and multiply like a superstrain of weeds in a newly plowed field.
Patients aggravate the problem when they do not finish a course of antibiotics prescribed by their doctor. Patients may stop taking tablets as soon as they begin to feel better. While the weakest microbes may have been killed, the strongest survive and quietly multiply. Within a few weeks, the disease reoccurs, but this time it is harder, or impossible, to cure with drugs. When these drug-resistant strains of microbes invade other people, a serious public-health problem results.
Experts at WHO stated recently: “Resistance [to antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents] is epidemic in many countries and multi-drug resistance leaves doctors with virtually no room for manoeuvre in the treatment of an increasing number of diseases. In hospitals alone, an estimated one million bacterial infections are occurring worldwide every day, and most of these are drug-resistant.”
Blood transfusions, used increasingly since the second world war, have also helped to spread infectious diseases. Despite the efforts of science to keep blood free of deadly microbes, blood transfusions have contributed significantly to the spread of hepatitis, cytomegalovirus, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, malaria, yellow fever, Chagas’ disease, AIDS, and many other dreadful diseases.
State of Things Today
While medical science has witnessed an explosion of knowledge during this century, there remain many mysteries. C. J. Peters studies dangerous microbes at the Centers for Disease Control, America’s foremost public-health laboratory. In an interview in May 1995, he said concerning Ebola: “We don’t know why it’s so virulent for man, and we don’t know what it’s doing [or] where it is, when it’s not causing these epidemics. We can’t find it. There’s no other virus family . . . that we have such a profound ignorance about.”
Even when effective medical knowledge, drugs, and vaccines exist to fight disease, applying them to those in need requires money. Millions live in poverty. WHO’s World Health Report 1995 states: “Poverty is the main reason why babies are not vaccinated, why clean water and sanitation are not provided, why curative drugs and other treatments are unavailable . . . Every year in the developing world 12.2 million children under 5 years die, most of them from causes which could be prevented for just a few US cents per child. They die largely because of world indifference, but most of all they die because they are poor.”
By 1995, infectious diseases and parasites were the world’s biggest killers, snuffing out the lives of 16.4 million people each year. Sadly, countless millions of people live in conditions that are ideal for the emergence and spread of deadly microbes. Consider the lamentable situation today. Over a billion people exist in extreme poverty. Half the world’s population lack regular access to medical treatment and essential drugs. On the streets of polluted megacities wander millions of abandoned children, many of whom inject drugs and practice prostitution. Millions of refugees languish in unhygienic camps amid cholera, dysentery, and other diseases.
In the war between man and microbe, conditions have increasingly favored the microbe.

Footnotes
Sulfanilamide is a crystalline compound from which sulfa drugs are made in the laboratory. Sulfa drugs can inhibit bacterial growth, allowing the body’s own defense mechanisms to kill the bacteria.
Other examples of s*xually transmitted diseases: Worldwide there are some 236 million people infected with trichomoniasis and about 162 million people with chlamydial infections. Each year there are approximately 32 million new cases of ge***al warts, 78 million of gonorrhea, 21 million of ge***al herpes, 19 million of syphilis, and 9 million of chancroid.

19/09/2014

The Limitations of Medical Science
Other reasons why infectious diseases are making a comeback relate to medical science itself. Many bacteria now defy antibiotics that once killed them. Ironically, antibiotics themselves have helped to create this situation. For example, if an antibiotic kills only 99 percent of the harmful bacteria in an infected person, the surviving one percent that resisted the antibiotic can now grow and multiply like a superstrain of weeds in a newly plowed field.
Patients aggravate the problem when they do not finish a course of antibiotics prescribed by their doctor. Patients may stop taking tablets as soon as they begin to feel better. While the weakest microbes may have been killed, the strongest survive and quietly multiply. Within a few weeks, the disease reoccurs, but this time it is harder, or impossible, to cure with drugs. When these drug-resistant strains of microbes invade other people, a serious public-health problem results.
Experts at WHO stated recently: “Resistance [to antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents] is epidemic in many countries and multi-drug resistance leaves doctors with virtually no room for manoeuvre in the treatment of an increasing number of diseases. In hospitals alone, an estimated one million bacterial infections are occurring worldwide every day, and most of these are drug-resistant.”
Blood transfusions, used increasingly since the second world war, have also helped to spread infectious diseases. Despite the efforts of science to keep blood free of deadly microbes, blood transfusions have contributed significantly to the spread of hepatitis, cytomegalovirus, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, malaria, yellow fever, Chagas’ disease, AIDS, and many other dreadful diseases.
State of Things Today
While medical science has witnessed an explosion of knowledge during this century, there remain many mysteries. C. J. Peters studies dangerous microbes at the Centers for Disease Control, America’s foremost public-health laboratory. In an interview in May 1995, he said concerning Ebola: “We don’t know why it’s so virulent for man, and we don’t know what it’s doing [or] where it is, when it’s not causing these epidemics. We can’t find it. There’s no other virus family . . . that we have such a profound ignorance about.”
Even when effective medical knowledge, drugs, and vaccines exist to fight disease, applying them to those in need requires money. Millions live in poverty. WHO’s World Health Report 1995 states: “Poverty is the main reason why babies are not vaccinated, why clean water and sanitation are not provided, why curative drugs and other treatments are unavailable . . . Every year in the developing world 12.2 million children under 5 years die, most of them from causes which could be prevented for just a few US cents per child. They die largely because of world indifference, but most of all they die because they are poor.”
By 1995, infectious diseases and parasites were the world’s biggest killers, snuffing out the lives of 16.4 million people each year. Sadly, countless millions of people live in conditions that are ideal for the emergence and spread of deadly microbes. Consider the lamentable situation today. Over a billion people exist in extreme poverty. Half the world’s population lack regular access to medical treatment and essential drugs. On the streets of polluted megacities wander millions of abandoned children, many of whom inject drugs and practice prostitution. Millions of refugees languish in unhygienic camps amid cholera, dysentery, and other diseases.
In the war between man and microbe, conditions have increasingly favored the microbe.
[Footnotes]
Sulfanilamide is a crystalline compound from which sulfa drugs are made in the laboratory. Sulfa drugs can inhibit bacterial growth, allowing the body’s own defense mechanisms to kill the bacteria.
Other examples of s*xually transmitted diseases: Worldwide there are some 236 million people infected with trichomoniasis and about 162 million people with chlamydial infections. Each year there are approximately 32 million new cases of ge***al warts, 78 million of gonorrhea, 21 million of ge***al herpes, 19 million of syphilis, and 9 million of chancroid.

19/09/2014

Why Are New Diseases Emerging?
With all the knowledge and assets possessed by modern medical science, why are killer microbes proving so difficult to defeat? One reason is the increased mobility of today’s society. Modern transportation can quickly make a local epidemic global. Jet travel makes it easy for a deadly disease to move, harbored inside an infected person, from one part of the world to any other part of the world within hours.
A second reason, which favors the microbe, is the explosive growth of the world’s population—especially in cities. Of course, garbage is produced in cities. Garbage contains plastic containers and tires filled with fresh rainwater. In the Tropics, that results in the multiplication of mosquitoes that are carriers of killer diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, and dengue. In addition, just as a thick forest can fuel a fire, so high-density population provides ideal conditions for the rapid spread of tuberculosis, influenza, and other airborne diseases.
A third reason for the return of the microbe has to do with changes in human behavior. Microbes that are transmitted s*xually have flourished and spread as a result of the unprecedented scale of multiple partner s*x relations, which have characterized the latter part of the 20th century. The spread of AIDS is just one example.
A fourth reason why killer microbes are proving so difficult to defeat is that man has invaded the jungles and rain forests. Author Richard Preston states in his book The Hot Zone: “The emergence of AIDS, Ebola, and any number of other rain-forest agents appears to be a natural consequence of the ruin of the tropical biosphere. The emerging viruses are surfacing from ecologically damaged parts of the earth. Many of them come from the tattered edges of tropical rain forest . . . The tropical rain forests are the deep reservoirs of life on the planet, containing most of the world’s plant and animal species. The rain forests are also its largest reservoirs of viruses, since all living things carry viruses.”
Humans have thus come into closer contact with insects and warm-blooded animals in which viruses harmlessly reside, reproduce, and die. But when a virus “jumps” from animal to human, the virus may become deadly.

19/09/2014

Devastating New Diseases
Other previously unrecognized infectious diseases include hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Transmitted by field mice, it appeared in the southwestern United States and proved fatal in more than half the reported cases. Two types of hemorrhagic fevers—both new, both fatal—have developed in South America. Other dreadful diseases have also arisen—viruses bearing strange, exotic names—Lassa, Rift Valley, Oropouche, Rocio, Q. Guanarito, VEE, monkeypox, Chikungunya, Mokola, Duvenhage, LeDantec, the Kyasanur Forest brain virus, the Semliki Forest agent, Crimean-Congo, O’nyongnyong, Sindbis, Marburg, Ebola.

19/09/2014

The Solution
Solving the problems of infectious disease is not simply a matter of developing new drugs. It involves solving the disease-related problems of poverty, war, refugees, abuse of drugs, overcrowding of cities, unhealthy life-styles, pollution, and destruction of the environment. These are complex problems which needs to be solved.

19/09/2014

Another weakness of surveillance programs is that they cannot recognize the emergence of slow-acting viral diseases. HIV, for example, can hide inside a person, spread to others, and then manifest itself as AIDS up to ten years later. The present AIDS pandemic emerged almost simultaneously on three continents and quickly invaded 20 different nations. Clearly, there was no early warning for that!
Despite the problems, many scientists still look to the future with confidence, speaking optimistically of major discoveries and breakthroughs that will surely come in the years ahead. The International Herald Tribune reports: “The best hope for true breakthroughs, many scientists say, is biotechnology, the manipulation of hereditary material in living cells. Scientists at biotech firms hope to create cells that produce germ-killing substances, that is, a new generation of genetically engineered antibiotics.”
There is, however, a dark side to this. Genetic engineering has made it possible to insert genes into a harmless virus so that the virus can deliver the genes to people. This technology can be used beneficially, perhaps actually making possible the production of so-called genetically engineered antibiotics. But this technology may also be used for sinister purposes.
For example, possibly genes from Ebola could be inserted by accident or design into a virus, such as influenza or measles. Then that deadly virus might be spread by a cough or a sneeze. Dr. Karl Johnson, who has spent a lifetime investigating viruses such as Machupo and Ebola, said that the time may soon come when “any crackpot with a few thousand dollars’ worth of equipment and a college biology education under his belt could manufacture bugs that would make Ebola look like a walk around the park.” Other biologists share his concern.

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P.O.BOX DK 261
Accra
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