Chris Peacock Farriers Ltd

Chris Peacock Farriers Ltd

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Local farriers in West Sussex. Mobile service or at forge.

Timeline Photos 25/08/2021

Timeline Photos

❓Would you recognise the subtle signs of laminitis❓

A recent survey found that 45% of horse owners didn’t realise their horse had laminitis as the signs can be so subtle.

Laminitis can cause extreme pain, lameness and permanent damage to the hooves. Being aware of the more subtle signs of laminitis can help you act faster, resulting in more efficient diagnosis and treatment.

Please read and share the information below to help us reach more horse owners and carers. To request a free A4 copy of this poster, contact our welfare team on [email protected]

To learn more visit: https://www.bhs.org.uk/advice-and-information/horse-health-and-sickness/laminitis

#WelfareWednesday #HereToHelp

20/07/2021

𝗘𝘅𝗲𝗿𝗰𝗶𝘀𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗵𝗼𝗿𝘀𝗲 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗦𝘂𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗿

To avoid heat stroke, horses in work should be kept as cool as possible before, during and after ridden work. Riding should be done during cooler times, so early in the morning or late in the evening.

Make sure you cool down your horse afterwards by hosing them down, or using a sponge with cold water all over their body.

⛔️⛔️𝗦𝗶𝗴𝗻𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝘁 𝘀𝘁𝗿𝗼𝗸𝗲⛔️⛔️:

⛔️Weakness
⛔️Increased temperature
⛔️High respiratory and heart rate
⛔️Altered behaviour ranging from lethargy to excitement
⛔️Dehydration
⛔️Dry mucous membranes in the mouth - they should be a pink salmon colour and have a slimy feel to them

𝗜𝗳 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗿𝗶𝗲𝗱 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗵𝗼𝗿𝘀𝗲 𝗺𝗮𝘆 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝘁 𝘀𝘁𝗿𝗼𝗸𝗲, 𝗽𝗹𝗲𝗮𝘀𝗲 𝗰𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝘂𝘀 𝗶𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗱𝗶𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗹𝘆 𝗼𝗻📞𝟬𝟭𝟰𝟮𝟴 𝟳𝟮𝟯𝟱𝟵𝟰📞.

Timeline Photos 09/05/2021

Timeline Photos

❗ LAMINITIS WARNING FROM VETS ❗

Vets are reporting that they are seeing a sharp increase in cases of laminitis.

🌦With the majority of the UK experiencing rain and periods of sunshine, this creates the perfect conditions for rapid grass growth.

🐴 Laminitis is an extremely painful condition and can cause permanent damage to the hooves. It affects structures called sensitive lamellae that are located inside the horse’s hoof. The sensitive lamellae form a strong bond to hold the pedal bone in place within the hoof.

Laminitis causes the sensitive lamellae to stretch, weaken and become damaged which can cause the pedal bone to move within the hoof. In extreme cases the pedal bone can even pe*****te through the sole of the hoof which is excruciatingly painful. In such cases, euthanasia is likely to be the only treatment option to end the horse’s suffering. 🌈

Horses carrying excess weight or have a health condition such as Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) are at an increased risk of laminitis so grazing may have to be restricted.

👀 Watch out for the subtle signs as shown below and if you have any concerns contact your vet.

For further advice, including prevention visit: https://www.bhs.org.uk/advice-and-information/horse-health-and-sickness/laminitis

#heretohelp

Photos from The Laminitis Site's post 06/04/2021

Photos from The Laminitis Site's post

Photos from The Laminitis Site's post 05/04/2021

Very good article! Stay vigilant.

27/02/2021
Photos from Mayes and Scrine's post 20/02/2021

I am seeing more laminitis as well!

27/01/2021

❄️❄️Frost-related laminitis❄️❄️
Did you know that there is a higher risk of laminitis in December/January than there is in the spring months of March-May? This is due to the higher levels of NSCs (which include sugars, starch and fructans) in the grass when the temperatures drop towards freezing. Sunny, frosty weather is particularly dangerous.

Laminitics, or overweight horses and ponies who are at risk of laminitis, should be kept off frozen pasture, especially on sunny days.

The frozen ground also has a secondary effect on exacerbating laminitis as the hard uneven ground can be painful to walk on for laminitics who may have thin soles and pedal bone rotation. Overgrown toes and long heels will add to this - so make sure their feet are kept well trimmed and in good balance.

09/08/2020

The Liphook Equine Hospital

Heatwave in the UK

Temperatures are set to rise over the next few days, reaching over a whopping 30 degrees.

Here are some tips on how to avoid your horse getting heat stroke:

🌞Horses in work should be kept as cool as possible before, during and after ridden work
🌞Exercising your horse should be done during cooler times, so early in the morning or late in the evening
🌞Make sure you cool down your horse afterwards by hosing them down, or using a sponge with cold water all over their body

Signs of heat stroke:

🌞Weakness
🌞Increased temperature (normal temperature should be 37.5-38.5°C)
🌞High respiratory and heart rate (normal respiration rate should be 12-16 breaths per minute/normal heart rate should be 30-45 beats per minute)
🌞Lethargy
🌞Dehydration
🌞Dry mucous membranes in the mouth -they should be a pink salmon colour and have a slimy feel to them

If you are worried your horse may be showing signs of heat stroke then please to not hesitate to call us on 01428 723594.

31/07/2020

South Coast Equine Vets/Natalie McGoldrick Equine

*** SOAKING HAY ***

After being asked a lot about weight of hay, and soaking hay, recently, I thought I’d post some (quite a few!) pointers!

- It is a good idea to know the weight of un soaked hay you are feeding, so a little spring weighing device is a good investment. (see photo)

- If your horse/pony is on a diet, then he/she will probably be on 1.5% body weight of dry hay for the initial period. This low % is not good for the horse/pony long term, as such low roughage intake can lead to ulcers, lowered metabolism, and is not good psychologically for the horse.

- Going for prolonged periods of time with no roughage to eat, is not ideal, but has not been shown to cause ulcers if done for a SHORT time scale, and will be better than the horse/pony losing his life to laminitis.

- Always consult with your vet, or nutritionist, but 2.5% dry weight hay, then soaked, is a better maintenance level for weight loss, and decreases the risk of both ulcers, and lowering metabolic rate.

- Soaking hay for 1-2 hours will simply reduce dust.

- Soaking hay for 7 hours reduces sugar content by only 24%
- Soaking hay for 16 hours reduces sugar content by 43%
- These studies were carried out by Professor Catherine McGowan at the University of Liverpool.

- I therefore normally advise clients to soak the night hay in the morning, and the hay for the following day, the night before. This is also practical.

- Due to the amount of sugars leaching out of the hay, in very hot weather, it is a good idea to soak the hay out of direct sunlight. There is no evidence to suggest that bacteria produced in the fermenting water is harmful to the horse, but it can make the hay smell, and put the horse off eating it.

- There is no evidence to support the theory that the hay becomes contaminated with bacteria if soaked for too long, or more specifically, no evidence to suggest that any bacteria produced by soaking hay, are harmful to the horse’s gut. This aside, I wouldn’t suggest soaking for more than 12 hours.

- Steaming hay DOES NOT REDUCE SUGAR CONTENT, but in an ideal world, soaking hay followed by steaming it, would be perfect.

- There is currently no evidence to suggest that soaked hay needs rinsing with clean water before feeding. With regards to the sugars sat around the haynet in the water, I advise agitating the net just before you lift it out.

- One pack of small bale hay weighs approximately 2kg, but this can vary.

- 15kg of hay contains roughly a whopping 2.5kg of sugar!!

- Simply reducing the amount of hay/haylage/grass intake is very UNLIKELY to cause weight loss. Reducing grass intake and soaking hay is the best method.

- For example, reducing the amount of high fibre haylage you are feeding, to as little as 1.5% body weight (so 7.5kg for a 500kg horse) still provides that horse with 100% of his daily calorie requirements. The same with good quality meadow hay. The ONLY way to reduce the calorie and sugar intake, whilst maintaining a good roughage intake (2.5% bodyweight) is to SOAK hay.

- Haylage not only doesn’t soak particularly well, but also causes a bigger jump in insulin when fed. Not much research has been done in this area, so stick with soaking hay!

- In horses with EMS or insulin resistance, large amounts of WSCs (water soluble carbohydrates) as found in unsoaked hay, are detrimental, as they cause a huge initial insulin response/spike.

*** BE VERY CAREFUL FEEDING YOUR HORSE SOAKED HAY - you MUST provide a vitamin and mineral supplement in the form of a balancer, if you are feeding soaked hay and no hard feed. You need to provide the micronutrients and essential protein. I normally recommend Baileys Lo-Cal to my clients. If you are soaking hay for respiratory issues, then only soak for an hour, or, ideally, steam the hay (assuming your horse doesn’t also need to lose weight!) ***

Please feel free to share!

22/07/2020

South Coast Equine Vets/Natalie McGoldrick Equine

*** SOAKING HAY ***

After being asked a lot about weight of hay, and soaking hay, recently, I thought I’d post some (quite a few!) pointers!

- It is a good idea to know the weight of un soaked hay you are feeding, so a little spring weighing device is a good investment. (see photo)

- If your horse/pony is on a diet, then he/she will probably be on 1.5% body weight of dry hay for the initial period. This low % is not good for the horse/pony long term, as such low roughage intake can lead to ulcers, lowered metabolism, and is not good psychologically for the horse.

- Going for prolonged periods of time with no roughage to eat, is not ideal, but has not been shown to cause ulcers if done for a SHORT time scale, and will be better than the horse/pony losing his life to laminitis.

- Always consult with your vet, or nutritionist, but 2.5% dry weight hay, then soaked, is a better maintenance level for weight loss, and decreases the risk of both ulcers, and lowering metabolic rate.

- Soaking hay for 1-2 hours will simply reduce dust.

- Soaking hay for 7 hours reduces sugar content by only 24%
- Soaking hay for 16 hours reduces sugar content by 43%
- These studies were carried out by Professor Catherine McGowan at the University of Liverpool.

- I therefore normally advise clients to soak the night hay in the morning, and the hay for the following day, the night before. This is also practical.

- Due to the amount of sugars leaching out of the hay, in very hot weather, it is a good idea to soak the hay out of direct sunlight. There is no evidence to suggest that bacteria produced in the fermenting water is harmful to the horse, but it can make the hay smell, and put the horse off eating it.

- There is no evidence to support the theory that the hay becomes contaminated with bacteria if soaked for too long, or more specifically, no evidence to suggest that any bacteria produced by soaking hay, are harmful to the horse’s gut. This aside, I wouldn’t suggest soaking for more than 12 hours.

- Steaming hay DOES NOT REDUCE SUGAR CONTENT, but in an ideal world, soaking hay followed by steaming it, would be perfect.

- There is currently no evidence to suggest that soaked hay needs rinsing with clean water before feeding. With regards to the sugars sat around the haynet in the water, I advise agitating the net just before you lift it out.

- One pack of small bale hay weighs approximately 2kg, but this can vary.

- 15kg of hay contains roughly a whopping 2.5kg of sugar!!

- Simply reducing the amount of hay/haylage/grass intake is very UNLIKELY to cause weight loss. Reducing grass intake and soaking hay is the best method.

- For example, reducing the amount of high fibre haylage you are feeding, to as little as 1.5% body weight (so 7.5kg for a 500kg horse) still provides that horse with 100% of his daily calorie requirements. The same with good quality meadow hay. The ONLY way to reduce the calorie and sugar intake, whilst maintaining a good roughage intake (2.5% bodyweight) is to SOAK hay.

- Haylage not only doesn’t soak particularly well, but also causes a bigger jump in insulin when fed. Not much research has been done in this area, so stick with soaking hay!

- In horses with EMS or insulin resistance, large amounts of WSCs (water soluble carbohydrates) as found in unsoaked hay, are detrimental, as they cause a huge initial insulin response/spike.

*** BE VERY CAREFUL FEEDING YOUR HORSE SOAKED HAY - you MUST provide a vitamin and mineral supplement in the form of a balancer, if you are feeding soaked hay and no hard feed. You need to provide the micronutrients and essential protein. I normally recommend Baileys Lo-Cal to my clients. If you are soaking hay for respiratory issues, then only soak for an hour, or, ideally, steam the hay (assuming your horse doesn’t also need to lose weight!) ***

Please feel free to share!

01/06/2020

Seen a few horses in the last week or so suffering from the hard ground. Particularly those whose soles were eroded by the wet winter and haven't recovered yet.

*** HARD GROUND ***

The ground is currently as hard as it could possibly get (at least in the south; I can’t speak for other parts of the country). There are no imminent competitions, and there will likely be nothing to qualify for at the moment, if at all this year. Therefore, it’s important to think twice before cantering/galloping, and definitely jumping, on the ground as it currently is. I am lucky to have a lovely arena to canter in, plus the beach when my work allows it. It really isn’t worth hammering your horse’s legs by going cantering around on this ground at the moment....and in my opinion, the ground is far too hard to go cross country schooling....
Enjoy the fact that we are hopefully heading out of the deadliest part of the pandemic, and go and hire an arena to have a canter and jump in. I’m sure the rain will return soon...

12/04/2020

Chiltern Equine Clinic

SPRING TIME ROUND-UP

Mornings might still be chilly out there, but days are getting longer and daffodils are starting to bloom around the fields - spring is nearly in full swing! As much as it is bringing us joy and positivity in these difficult, uncertain times, life still carries on for our equine friends and we must keep up to give them the best care. So we have rounded up the 8 best things you can do for your horse in the coming weeks and months, to avoid common problems this time of year and to make sure you're ready to enjoy the summer.

Coat changes - with a little elbow grease: unless you’ve kept your horse clipped, the long, thick winter coat will start shedding away. Daily brushing will help this process, whilst clipping will keep your horse from sweating excessively during exercise as the weather warms up. It is a good time to check for new lumps or bumps. If you suspect your horse is prone to or has lice or mites, ask your vet for the best prevention and treatment. At war with the worms: a vet-guided worm control programme involves routine worm egg counts to assess the need for a wormer and avoid resistance, along with good practices (i.e. poo-picking and field rotation). Your vet can also offer blood tests to detect encysted red worm and tapeworm, both of which can cause major problems. Please give us a call if you need further advice. Heaves and hives: allergies are some of the most dreaded conditions amongst horse owners. Whether they manifest as skin or breathing problems, knowing and avoiding the triggers is as important as getting right treatment should a crisis arise.

Spring brings more insects and higher pollen counts - using fly sheets, avoiding turnout at dawn and dusk, increasing ventilation and reducing stable and feed dust are all very helpful measures for horses that might struggle. Preventing colic - is far more convenient than having to deal with it. Whether your horse has spent the winter in or on turnout, spring might bring changes in routine and feeding that could trigger colic episodes. We always recommend such changes to be made very slowly over 1-2 weeks to minimise stress and give time to the horse’s gut to get use to them. As temperatures rise, please ensure your horse or pony has plenty of access to fresh, clean water at all times.

Body condition checks: this is a great time to assess your horse’s physical condition. How has your horse come out of winter? Is there any weight loss or weight gain that needs addressing? Get familiar with the 9 points of the body condition score and talk to your vet if you’re concerned - this is particularly important for horses and ponies with PPID (Cushing’s), equine metabolic syndrome and previous history of laminitis. You might need to adjust your horse’s feed and access to pasture. Don’t wait for pests to be a problem: flies and midges can be extremely annoying for horses and ponies, particularly when out in the field in the warm months. Moreover, flies increase the likelihood of eye infections, sarcoids, wound infections and maggot infestations. Invest on some quality fly gear such as sheets, fly masks and repellent sprays ahead of time - don’t forget to check they are fitted properly to avoid rubs and sores.

Hoof care: it’s still ‘business as usual’ for farriers, who are doing their best to observe government guidelines on social distancing and bio security. So it is very important to ensure your horse’s feet are trimmed and shod, if appropriate, at their regular intervals where possible. As fields are drying up, foot abscesses and thrush might be going away - but we must stay vigilant for bruising! Dreaming on: finally, if you consider breeding from your mares or you currently have mares due to foal this spring - rest assured we are available to provide the best attention and care to ensure all your needs are met.

Category

Pet

Telephone

Address


Nash Vineyard, Steyning, West Sussex
Steyning
BN44 3
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