Dragonfly Native American Jewelry

We are passionate about the cultures and art forms of the American Indian.

Mission: Preservation of American Indian art forms and artists by educating our customers as to the quality and authenticity of handmade Native American Art and Jewelry. We pledge to honestly represent and back what we sell.

Operating as usual

U.S. Department of the Interior

No, the bison at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming haven’t learned to fly. Yet. Despite weighing as much as 2,000 pounds, bison are agile and can run up to 35 miles per hour. They can jump over objects 5 feet high and have excellent hearing, vision and sense of smell.

Photographer Alex Walczak witnessed their power when he took this wonderful picture, “There was a whole group of them rolling around and I noticed a young bison running all over the place on the hill. I got this photo while it was in the middle of jumping and kicking like a bronco. After about 5 minutes of racing around, this young bison calmed down.” We guess it just needed to burn off some energy. Photo courtesy of Alex Walczak.

#ICYMI We're looking back on our favorite posts of 2020. The bison with the zoomies definitely makes the cut. #Top10of2020

CBC Edmonton

It was a crime of opportunity that brought great amusement to the Bryant household in Calgary's Cambrian Heights neighbourhood earlier this week.

See more photos here: www.cbc.ca/1.5845935

(🎥: Sheila Bryant⁠)

Mujeres De Maiz

NATIVE AMERICAN AWARENESS MONTH...
Reminds us that we are Strong, Resilient, Indigenous!

Repost from @reclaimyourpower

✊🏾⚡artwork by @eloybida
Strong Resilient Indigenous

A Mighty Girl

Maria Tallchief, the first Native American to become a prima ballerina, was one of the most acclaimed ballerinas of the 20th century. Born in 1925, Tallchief grew up on the Osage Reservation in Oklahoma. As noted in a NY Times tribute to her, "Growing up at a time when many American dancers adopted Russian stage names, Ms. Tallchief, proud of her Indian heritage, refused to do so, even though friends told her that it would be easy to transform Tallchief into Tallchieva."

Tallchief kept her name and made her mark throughout the dance world, dancing with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo from 1942 to 1947 and the New York City Ballet from its founding in 1947 through 1965. She is pictured here in the title role of George Balanchine's ballet "Firebird." This dance legend passed away in 2013 at the age of 88.

To introduce this pioneering dancer to children, we highly recommend "Who Is Maria Tallchief" for ages 8 to 12 (https://www.amightygirl.com/who-is-maria-tallchief) and "Tallchief: American's Prima Ballerina" for ages 4 to 9 (https://www.amightygirl.com/tallchief-america-s-prima-ballerina)

She is also among the women featured in "This Little Trailblazer" for ages 1 to 4 (https://www.amightygirl.com/this-little-trailblazer) and "She Persisted: 13 American Women Who Changed the World," for ages 5 to 9 (https://www.amightygirl.com/she-persisted)

To discover our favorite fictional picture books about Mighty Girl dancers, visit our blog post, "Dancing Her Heart Out: 20 Picture Books About Mighty Girls Who Love to Dance," at https://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=12378

For more books about Native American and Indigenous girls and women to share during November's Native American Heritage Month, check out our blog post, 50 Children's Books Celebrating Native American and Indigenous Mighty Girls" at https://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=10365

Ecological Consciousness

National Native American Heritage Month

Shoshone from Wind River Wyoming

Occupy Democrats

Happy Indigenous People’s Day...

My Heart Speaks

Elder's Meditation of the Day October 5

"The dances are prayers."
--Pop Chalee, TAOS PUEBLO

When we dance to the drum we pray to the Creator and attract the heartbeat of the earth. We never dance without reason; every dance has a purpose. We dance for rain; we dance for healing; we dance for seasons; we dance for joy; we dance for our children; we dance for the people; we dance for courage. The drum plays to the beat of the heart, to the beat of the Earth. The drum connects us to the Earth while we dance our prayers.

Oh, Great One, let my dance and prayer be heard by You.

Copied with the permission of Don L. Coyhis, from the book Meditations with Native American Elders: The Four Seasons If anyone would like to purchase the book is can be found at:
Coyhis Publishing at: http://www.coyhispublishing.com/store.php/products/meditations-with-native-american-elders-the-four-seasons Or Amazon at: http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/1605304514/ref

amazon.com

Amazon.com: Buying Choices: Meditations with Native American Elders: The Four Seasons

Elder's Meditation of the Day October 5

"The dances are prayers."
--Pop Chalee, TAOS PUEBLO

When we dance to the drum we pray to the Creator and attract the heartbeat of the earth. We never dance without reason; every dance has a purpose. We dance for rain; we dance for healing; we dance for seasons; we dance for joy; we dance for our children; we dance for the people; we dance for courage. The drum plays to the beat of the heart, to the beat of the Earth. The drum connects us to the Earth while we dance our prayers.

Oh, Great One, let my dance and prayer be heard by You.

Copied with the permission of Don L. Coyhis, from the book Meditations with Native American Elders: The Four Seasons If anyone would like to purchase the book is can be found at:
Coyhis Publishing at: http://www.coyhispublishing.com/store.php/products/meditations-with-native-american-elders-the-four-seasons Or Amazon at: http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/1605304514/ref

amazon.com

[09/10/20]   THE NAVAJO LEGEND

Johano-ai starts each day from his hogan, in the east, and rides across the skies to his hogan in the west, carrying the shining golden disk, the sun. He has five horses—a horse of turquoise, a horse of white shell, a horse of pearl shell, a horse of red shell, and a horse of coal.

When the skies are blue and the weather is fair, Johano-ai is riding his turquoise horse or his horse of white shell or of pearl; but when the heavens are dark with storm, he has mounted the red horse, or the horse of coal. White shell and pearl horses represent dawn, turquoise is noon, red shell is sunset, and jet or coal is night.

When the Holy People first made the horse, it was a complete thing, but it would not come to life. They tried to get it to rise up on its strong legs, but it would not rise. Caterpillar was asked to help. "How can I help?" he asked. "You know," one of the Holy People said, "where the sacred flints are kept." "Yes, this is true. But I am slow getting around." Then the Holy People prayed over Caterpillar and he became Butterfly. Swiftly he flew to the mountain where flint is kept, and gathering four flints, he returned to the Holy People and put the flints into the hooves of the horse. The great horse stirred, quivered, came to life. Then it surged, leaped into life, struck the air with its hooves, and galloped off into the clouds.

"Look," a Holy Person said,"the horse makes the marks of Butterfly when it dances on its hooves." And it has been that way ever since.

The word, mariposa, means "butterfly" in Spanish.

National Congress of American Indians

#NativeArtSaturday The Wampanoag, like many other First Nations people, often refer to the earth as Turtle Island. The old medicine man of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe was named Slow Turtle. Learn more: http://bit.ly/turtleislandart

National Congress of American Indians

Truth is simple. #MotivationMonday

Shameful.

The First Prisoners
by Rebekha C. Crockett

On this date, August 27th, in 1863, the first group of Navajos who surrendered was sent from Fort Wingate to Los Pinos, escorted by Lt. Thomas Holmes. The group was made up of 51 individuals, men, women and children, who were members of Chief Sandoval’s band. Following their departure from Fort Wingate, General James H. Carleton wrote letters to Lt. Holmes as well as to Captain Updegraff who was, at the time, in command of Fort Sumner.

To Updegraff he wrote “…I have sent you 51 Navajo men, women, and children, who are likewise to be retained near your post as prisoners. They will be allotted some place where they will be by themselves. They are to be fed by the Indian agent, as the Apaches are fed, and are to be treated with the greatest kindness. As fast as others are captured they will be sent to you. It is my purpose to have the whole Bosque Redondo part of the valley of the Pecos set apart as an Indian reservation, and place upon it all captured Navajoes and Apaches. They belong to the same family, and as a Pueblo under proper care and instruction, will soon again become a homogeneous people…”

Dr. Michael Steck, the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, upon hearing this, wrote from Santa Fe to Mescalero Apache Agent Lorenzo Labadie at Fort Sumner “General J. H. Carleton has sent to Fort Sumner 50 Navajoes, men, women and children belonging to Sandoval’s band. They will be taken care of by the military, as they are prisoners of War and should remain entirely under the control of the Commanding Officer while the tribe continues hostile. If these prisoners are offered to you, refuse the offer, as they legitimately, under the circumstances stated fall directly under the Military Department and the provisions requisite for their Subsistence should come from that source. With the limited means at our command we shall not be able to supply those already under our charge as liberally as they should be…”

At this point in time, a scorched earth campaign against the Mescalero Apache had brought in about 500 of the tribe. Afterwards, Kit Carson turned his attention to waging a similar but larger campaign against the Navajo. These letters record the first group of Navajos to surrender being brought to Fort Sumner as prisoners. The number of Navajo captives would swell from these first 51 to nearly 9,000 at its peak. Moreover, the correspondence shows Carleton’s limited understanding of the tribes. He assumed that, sharing a root language, the Navajo and Mescalero Apache were similar enough to unite as one tribe. While there is common ground between the two groups, there were also some very important differences and conflicts which were aggravated by the scarcity of resources and population disparity at Bosque Redondo. Lastly, the letters reveal the lack of preparation by the government and the military for taking care of the thousands of prisoners they were forcefully relocating to a relatively barren landscape. Arguments over who should provide food and supplies to the captives, as well as the struggle to acquire and pay for said food and supplies, would cause great suffering in the years to come.

Photo: “Fort Sumner Indian Quarters, Fort Sumner, New Mexico” 1862-1863 from the Bainbridge Bunting Photograph Collection, Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors. Negative #28533

My Heart Speaks

Elder's Meditation of the Day August 14

"It's time Indians tell the world what we know... about nature and about God. So I'm going to tell you what I know and who I am. You guys better listen. You have a lot to learn.
--Mathew King, LAKOTA

A long time ago the Creator came to Turtle Island and said to the Red People - "You will be the keepers of the Mother Earth. Among you I will give the wisdom about nature, about the interconnectedness of all things, about balance and about living in harmony. You Red People will see the secrets of nature. You will live in hardship and the blessing of this is you will stay close to the Creator. The day will come when you will need to share the secrets with the other people of the earth because they will stray from their spiritual ways. The time to start sharing is today."

Oh Great Spirit, today I am ready for You to use me as a channel of Your peace. Let my walk today be visible so the people will say "There goes a Man of God." I want to know what He knows. If they ask, I will tell them to go out into the wilderness and pray for You to guide them.

ncai.org

The History of the Jingle Dress Dance | NCAI

ncai.org Published on Aug 12, 2020 Throughout Indian Country, women and girls don their Jingle Dresses and mesmerize powwows as they move lightly, kicking out their heels and bouncing to the drumbeat. The dresses – also known as Prayer Dresses – are lined with rows and rows of metal cones, or ziibaaska.....

🌶

New Mexico Nomad

Yummy🌶

Fall in NewMexico. Cool mornings, the smell of chile roasting, with golden aspens & cottonwoods heralding the approach of winter.

thevintagenews.com

The Lost World of Socotra - One of the Most Alien-Looking Places on Earth

thevintagenews.com There is a tiny island called Socotra in the Arabian Sea in the Middle East where it seems time stopped a long, long time ago and, by the looks of it, it

National Congress of American Indians

#NativeArtSaturday A woven basket made by Lucy Telles, who learned basket weaving as a child, anc was well known for her fine basketry. While traditional #Miwok baskets had one color, she used two colors per basket.

Photo credit: National Museum of the American Indian

indiancountrytoday.com

Champion hoop dancer Nakota LaRancer dead at age 30 from a fall

So much talent. Such a tradegy. Please keep his family in your prayers💔

indiancountrytoday.com ‘His biggest love was giving back to the Native American youth’

scientificamerican.com

Coronavirus Is Attacking the Navajo ‘because We Have Built the Perfect Human for It to Invade’

scientificamerican.com A traditional Diné storyteller explains how disadvantage and injustice have shaped her people’s encounter with COVID-19

The Heard Museum Guild Native Artist Show in early March 2020. Just before everything shut down. We hustled straight home.
These are some of the amazing winning pieces.
All Festivals in Santa Fe cancelled this summer. Including SWAIA Indian Market. No one even able to sell at the Palace of the Governors. Very tough time for Native Artists.

A must read.

COVID-19 has hit the Navajo and Hopi Nations hard. There are as many cases per capita as in NY City, but the assistance isn't there. Here's how you can help.

The Flags - https://mailchi.mp/a2e6de60f63f/the-flags

[04/04/20]   Tough call but too much risk in this time of uncertainty. Please support your Native artists. They need you now more than ever.

The 99th Santa Fe Indian Market will be postponed until 2021, it’s Centennial Celebration year.

This decision was made by the SWAIA Board of Directors this week. Board Member and artist Dominique Toya expressed the Board’s rationale best when she said,

"This is a difficult decision because Indian Market is a big part of my livelihood, but it is more important to protect the well-being of fellow artists, their families, our customers, and all of our communities. We pray for your health and safety and look forward to seeing you when Indian Market goes live again in 2021."

ARTISTS:

All artists who juried into the 2020 Market are considered automatically accepted into the 2021 Market. If you have paid booth fees to reserve your spot for 2020 you have a choice: 1) Full refund (our staff will contact you soon to find the best way to process your refund); or 2) Apply fees paid to your 2021 booth.

VIRTUAL MARKET BEING CONSIDERED:

A Board Committee was formed and will explore the feasibility of SWAIA conducting a “virtual market” for 2020. This approach would promote on-line sales for artists, and it has the potential to reach a wide audience. If you have ideas for converting Market to a virtual platform, please share them with Board Member Mark Bahti at [email protected].

The months ahead will be challenging, and SWAIA will need to replace the revenues that would normally be generated by Indian Market activities such as the Haute Couture Fashion Show, the Indian Market Gala, and booths featuring nearly 1,000 award winning artists. If you normally visit Santa Fe to enjoy Indian Market, consider donating to SWAIA the travel funds you will save by not making the trip this year. Your help now will keep SWAIA healthy and ready to put on the next Market as soon as it is safe to do so. Please check the “DONATE” button at the top of this page for instructions.

Sincerely,

Thomas A. Teegarden

Chairman - Board of Directors

U.S. Department of the Interior

No, the bison at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming haven’t learned to fly. Yet. Despite weighing as much as 2,000 pounds, bison are strong swimmers and can run up to 35 miles per hour. They can jump over objects 5 feet high and have excellent hearing, vision and sense of smell. Photographer Alex Walczak witnessed their power when he took this wonderful picture, “There was a whole group of them rolling around and I noticed a young bison running all over the place on the hill. I got this photo while it was in the middle of jumping and kicking like a bronco. After about 5 minutes of racing around, this young bison calmed down.” We guess it just needed to burn off some energy. Photo courtesy of Alex Walczak.

The Vintage News

So cool Piar Marks!!! Get your fur out😁

Breathtaking photos of a culture that has almost vanished.

Indian Country Today

Appalling 😡

Tohono O’odham Nation Chairman Ned Norris said the “controlled blasting” for a border wall that will ultimately cut through his reservation is just the latest example of the federal government ignoring its duty to consult with tribes.

New Website Launch

I am really excited about my new website! It has taken a while to get it up and running but I love the new Shopify Platform. It has a great new look I hope you all enjoy. I have so many wonderful new items to add. Please check it out and check back for new additions! As always, I strive to bring you a great selection of various Native Artists and price points to fit every budget. I offer flexible layaway plans with no interest to help you buy that special piece.

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