Virginia Tech's Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center

Virginia Tech's Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center

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Thank you Dr. Kelleher and your staff from Takoda Tate and myself. Our future is bright 💖
Animal.Angels..thank.you.all.for.helping.the.Equines.xo
Thank you for helping me save my mare ❤️
All you horse owners out there please be aware!
Thank you Dr. Brown and all of the staff at the clinic for the upmost passionate care and attention to my my precious Pearl as we finally figured out the route of most her re-occurring infections for the past 1 1/2 years 😇🐴💜💞 The infected tooth is finally out and Pearl is back to her normal self, out grazing in the field with her big sister Bobby Jo (JC name: Barrister Bob) and being mischievous whenever there is a temptation in front of them. I know for sure that her and I are both relieved and very grateful for all the diagnostic equipment available and the dedication from all the staff at the clinic before, during and after the surgery yesterday !!!!! I just want to make it extra well-known that Pearl and I are sincerely grateful, thankful and smiling at heart for all the wonderful staff at the clinic 🐴😇💙😊🐎💚 We cannot thank you all enough from the bottom of our hearts 💜💙💚💞Dr. Brown and staff, you treated my girl just like family and Pearl and I appreciate that to no end !!!!!

The Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center in Leesburg, Virginia, offers advanced specialty care, 24-hour emergency treatment, and cutting-edge diagnostic services.

Virginia Tech’s Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center is a premier, full-service equine hospital located in Leesburg, Virginia, and one of two hospitals of the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine. We offer advanced specialty care, 24-hour emergency treatment, and diagnostic services for all ages and breeds of horses. Our team of equine specialists in internal medicine, reproduction, sports medicine and rehabilitation, and surgery is committed to providing exceptional treatment for patients and superior service to clients; training today's and tomorrow’s veterinarians in the latest medical technologies and procedures; and advancing new knowledge through innovative scholarship and clinical discovery.

Mission: The Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center is fully integrated with the missions of the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, consistent with the land grant traditions of Virginia Tech and the University of Maryland. Our constituents are those with an interest in the horse: students, veterinarians, horse owners, and horse professionals. Our faculty and staff strive to provide: • Pre-eminent equine health care services for the region; • Exemplary educational experiences for veterinary students, interns, and residents; • New knowledge for the well-being of the horse, and for the economic benefit of the equine industry.

In honor of EMC's residents, interns, and clinical support staff

This tribute to EMC’s residents, interns, and clinical support staff salutes their tireless support of the center’s clinicians as all worked to maintain critical emergency services during these unprecedented times.

At all hours of the day and night, in layers of personal protective clothing and under strict biosecurity guidelines, they treated critically ill horses with the same care and attention exhibited during more “normal” times.

On behalf of the horses and clients that you have so diligently cared for, we extend a huge thank you for your hard work, energy, and dedication under such challenging conditions!

(These photos were taken before biosecurity and social distancing protocols were put into place at EMC.)

Town Hall with VA-MD Vet Med's fifth dean, Dan Givens: "What to Expect During Unexpected Times"

Please join VA-MD Vet Med's fifth dean, Dr. M. Daniel Givens, for a virtual Town Hall tomorrow, June 4, at 3:30 p.m.

Introducing himself virtually with the hope that he can soon begin to meet everyone in person, Dean Givens will discuss his ideas around the values that shape VA-MD Vet Med and how he will engage with the college community in his decision-making process.

Feel free to invite friends, family, and colleagues, and we'll see you tomorrow!

Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine's fifth dean Dan Givens, DVM, PhD, DACT, DACVM (Virology), will discuss his ideas around the values that sha...

Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine

Welcome, Dean Givens!

Today, the VA-MD Vet Med community warmly and proudly welcomed Dr. M. Daniel Givens on his first official day as dean of the college. The best is yet to come!

On Memorial Day and every day, EMC honors the men, the women, and the horses and mules lost in service to the country. 🇺🇸

The Equine Medical Center's Intensive Care Unit provides 24/7 advanced specialty care with life-support capabilities for newborn foals.

This year’s foaling season has been busy, with more than 40 foals (and counting) treated for such maladies as oxygen deprivation, bacterial septicemia, orthopedic issues, and prematurity.

Around-the-clock monitoring by EMC’s board-certified experts and licensed technicians, and access to the center’s advanced imaging modalities and onsite diagnostic lab ensured that each foal received the expert care and treatment it needed to survive and thrive!

Learn more about neonatal intensive care at EMC: https://bit.ly/emc-neonatal-icu

What is your diagnosis?

ANSWER: CASE NO. 2

On May 1, we posted symptoms experienced by Charlton Chico, a 16.2 hand, off-the-track thoroughbred, and asked you to post your diagnosis. Congratulations to those who diagnosed Chico as having a hoof abscess!

EMC farrier Paul Goodness, CJF (who, by the way, served as the official U.S. Equestrian Team farrier from 1992 to 1996, including a trip to the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta) explained:

An abscess can form due to damage sustained to the hoof from something sharp: a nail, screw, or sharp stone. Poor hoof quality, which often includes thin, soft soles and wall separations, may also be to blame, allowing bacteria to penetrate the hoof. Poor hoof quality can be due to genetics, wet weather, poor stable conditions, lack of appropriate/routine hoof care, dramatic changes in weather from wet to dry, or underlying endocrine disease. In this area of Virginia, summer humidity and constant fly stomping are also contributing factors that affect hoof quality.

TREATMENT

The abscess will need to be drained as soon as possible to prevent further infection and to relieve pain. Hoof testers will be used to locate the source of pain, and sometimes a draining track is located after removing the shoe and trimming the sole. In some cases, it is necessary to take x-rays to pinpoint the infection.

A paring knife will be used to make a hole large enough to encourage the abscess to drain, which should result in immediate pain relief. It can be difficult to locate the exact area of concern, but there are several excellent products that can aid in the softening of structures and disinfecting of the hoof to help the abscess “erupt” and decrease pain.

Once the abscess is opened and draining, it is important to keep the area treated and clean, by way of wraps, boots, or alternative shoeing techniques.

Learn more about EMC’s therapeutic farrier services: http://bit.ly/emc-farrier-services

After developing a fever and elevated heart rate at home, Irish, a critically ill 7-year-old thoroughbred gelding, was referred to the EMC by Dr. Danielle Grady of Haymarket Veterinary Service in Haymarket, Virginia, for further critical care, diagnostics, and treatment of an infected wound over his left stifle.

Irish's condition worsened rapidly, and the gelding was soon struggling to breathe. Diagnostics revealed that bacteria from the infected wound had entered his bloodstream and caused severe damage to his lungs.

Irish was administered oxygen and a continuous infusion of antibiotics to control the infection. He responded well; and after several days on oxygen to allow his lungs to heal, Irish was ready to go home!

During his treatment at the EMC, which was under strict biosecurity because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the internal medicine team, led by Dr. Krista Estell, clinical assistant professor of equine medicine, kept Irish’s owner, Allison Mills (@allison.mills.31), up to date via phone and text messages.

Managing to maintain services for these critical emergency cases has been a top priority at the EMC, and it was gratifying to read Allison’s social-distancing-approved message to EMC staff: “Everyone did an AMAZING job taking care of Irish and helping him towards a full recovery.”

Learn more about EMC’s internal medicine services: http://bit.ly/emc-internal-medicine

emc.vetmed.vt.edu

EMC updates on response to COVID-19

A May 4, 2020, message from Dr. Michael Erskine, EMC director and Jean Ellen Shehan Professor:

Dear EMC clients and referring veterinarians,

On April 29, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced in a briefing that Order of Public Health Emergency Two, which he signed almost six weeks ago to temporarily ban all elective procedures at Virginia hospitals, was allowed to expire at midnight on April 30. This expiration effectively means that medical facilities, including veterinary hospitals, across the commonwealth are now able to resume elective procedures.

We welcome this news and have received authorization from Virginia Tech administration to begin a transition to full clinical services at the Equine Medical Center.

On May 4, using a phased approach in consideration of reduced staffing and medical supplies, we will start scheduling elective appointments and procedures, beginning with patients currently on our waiting list.

The health and safety of our employees and clients remain our primary focus. Our patient drop-off policy will remain in effect, and we will continue social distancing and other safety measures consistent with university policy and public health principles.

On behalf of the EMC faculty and staff, I extend our appreciation for the patience of our clients and referring veterinarians. I also extend my gratitude to the EMC faculty and staff for their dedication and professionalism.

For more information 👇

emc.vetmed.vt.edu On April 29, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced in a briefing that Order of Public Health Emergency Two, which he signed almost six weeks ago to temporarily ban all elective procedures at Virginia hospitals, was allowed to expire at midnight on April 30. This expiration effectively means that med...

Putting your equine knowledge to the test: What is wrong with this horse?

It’s time for the second installment of our "What's your diagnosis?" challenge. We're putting you to the test by periodically posting a description of an equine illness or condition and asking that you respond with your diagnosis. We’ll allow a few days for your responses, and then we'll confirm the diagnosis and provide additional feedback.

CASE NO. 2

Symptoms: Charlton Chico, a 16.2 hand, off-the-track thoroughbred, came in from turnout chronically lame on his left front. There is no swelling on the leg itself and no visible signs of trauma to the leg or hoof.

What is your diagnosis? Respond in the comments. 👇

These photos of Takoda Tate under saddle for the first time since his treatment were sent to us by his owner Tracy Adams, of Bealeton, Virginia. A well-loved 13-year-old gelding, Takoda is a three-quarter spotted draft thoroughbred cross.

Last year, Takoda Tate was referred to the EMC with left front lameness. Although his primary care veterinarian had reviewed multiple sets of radiographs and an ultrasound, the cause of Takoda’s lameness was still unclear.

An MRI taken at the EMC provided Dr. Maureen Kelleher, clinical assistant professor of sports medicine and surgery, with clearly defined diagnostics, leading to recommendations for surgical and therapeutic treatment options.

A full recovery was brought about with careful home care and the support of Takoda Tate’s primary care veterinarian. “Takoda and I cannot thank Dr. Kelleher and her staff enough,” Tracy commented. “It took a village to get Takoda sound and to keep me from losing my mind! I am grateful to each and every one of them.”

The EMC maintains a small herd of teaching horses that aids in the instruction of visiting DVM students from the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, who rotate through the center as part of their clinical training. While here at the EMC, students work closely with faculty and clinical support staff to manage horses referred for elective or emergency care. Currently, however, our students are participating in remote learning and are not physically present to engage with the horses.

In addition to aiding clinical training, these horses are the EMC’s equine blood donors. After their blood type is identified, they are ready for blood transfusions, a potentially life-saving procedure for horses suffering from shock after trauma, laceration, or hemolytic crisis.

Members of our small herd live outside in a large field and are closely monitored and cared for by EMC staff.

Learn more about the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program: https://bit.ly/DVM-VMCVM

Learn more about blood transfusions offered at the EMC: http://bit.ly/emc-transfusions

Generally, most mares foal naturally without any intervention. But sometimes, because of past issues or simply as a safeguard, owners choose to have EMC monitor their mare through the foaling process.

One such foal, a bay filly was born unassisted at EMC on March 19. Bright and alert very quickly after birth, she became a favorite of EMC resident Dr. Megan Marchitello, who has a special interest in equine neonatology and was a member of the team called in to be present at the birth in case of complications.

Dr. Marchitello, who photographed the mare and foal just minutes after birth, reports that they are now at home and thriving! 🥰

Learn more about EMC’s Neonatal and Reproductive Services: http://bit.ly/emc-foal-care

What is your diagnosis?

ANSWER: CASE NO. 1

On April 6, we posted symptoms and an image of Sunny, a 15-hand quarter horse, and asked you to post your diagnosis. Congratulations to those who diagnosed Sunny as having poll evil.

Dr. Krista Estell, clinical assistant professor of internal medicine, explains: The poll area of the horse is very sensitive and can become injured or infected by impact or poorly fitting tack. If the infection reaches the large ligament that runs from the base of the skull to the withers, the affected horse can feel intense pain. If left untreated, fistula tracts will form and can develop purulent discharge.

Treatment: Although poll evil is a rare condition, the prognosis improves with early treatment. The condition can be treated medicinally, but removal of the infected bursa may sometimes be necessary.

Learn more about EMC’s internal medicine services: http://bit.ly/emc-internal-medicine

Learn more about Dr. Krista Estell: https://bit.ly/emc-estell

emc.vetmed.vt.edu

EMC updates on response to COVID-19

The Foal Watch Volunteer Program has been canceled for 2020, effective April 8, 2020.

For more information about EMC operations 👇

emc.vetmed.vt.edu This week, updated guidelines were received from Virginia Tech, from the governors of Virginia and Maryland, and from federal authorities. EMC's social distancing policies, including its patient drop-off policy and suspension of patient visitation, are in line with public health guidelines regarding...

Part of caring for horses entails noticing when they are just not “right.” Signs are sometimes obvious and on other occasions are very subtle. When a medical issue arises, do you know what to look out for, how to care for your horse, and when to call your veterinarian?

In the coming months, we will put you to the test by periodically posting a description of an equine illness or condition and asking you to respond with your diagnosis. We'll let a few days pass to allow responses, and then we’ll confirm the diagnosis and provide additional feedback.

CASE NO. 1: Sunny

Symptoms: After banging his head during trailer transport, Sunny, a 15-hand quarter horse, had developed a pronounced, painful swelling just behind his ears and will not tolerate his halter or bridle being fitted. He is extending his head and neck and is reluctant to move, and the area is obviously painful to the touch. Purulent fluid (pus) has started to drain from a small rupture (opening) in the swelling.

What is your diagnosis? Respond in the comments.

emc.vetmed.vt.edu

EMC updates on response to COVID-19

An April 3, 2020, message from Dr. Michael Erskine, EMC director and Jean Ellen Shehan Professor:

Dear EMC clients and referring veterinarians,

The EMC continues to respond to the considerable challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. This week, we received updated guidelines from Virginia Tech, from the governors of Virginia and Maryland, and from federal authorities. By all accounts, our country and region are in for a rough time, and we are all called upon to do our part for one another.

Our highest priority is to protect the health and safety of EMC staff and clients so that we can continue to provide essential veterinary care for our equine patients. The EMC implemented a patient drop-off policy for all appointments, including emergencies, and also temporarily suspended patient visitation until further notice. These social distancing policies are in line with public health guidelines regarding COVID-19 and were made in concert with the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine and Virginia Tech.

The EMC continues to receive patients in need of emergency or urgent critical care. All other cases are placed on a waiting list that is reviewed regularly by our team. Waiting list cases will be scheduled based on medical need and our capacity (including space, equipment, supplies, and personnel) to provide these needed services. We will contact you as soon as we are able to make your appointment.

This week, we implemented innovative scheduling of staff to decrease the number of EMC employees who are on-site while still enabling us to perform our essential functions. This new process includes rotating schedules, working from home, or being on standby and reporting to duty only when called upon. Employees who must be on-site are asked to strictly adhere to the principles of social distancing and biosecurity to keep each other healthy and safe. We appreciate your understanding as we implement these necessary staffing policies.

Please join me in thanking the faculty and staff of EMC for all of their efforts on behalf of the horses in our region. During these uncertain times, the professionalism of the EMC team is on display every day. Also, please accept my sincere thanks for your support of the Equine Medical Center and our employees during these extraordinary times. Together, we will overcome the many challenges of this pandemic and will continue to provide essential veterinary care for our equine patients.

For more information 👇

emc.vetmed.vt.edu This week, updated guidelines were received from Virginia Tech, from the governors of Virginia and Maryland, and from federal authorities. EMC's social distancing policies, including its patient drop-off policy and suspension of patient visitation, are in line with public health guidelines regarding...

issuu.com

Country Zest & Style Spring 2020 Edition

Have you ever considered alternative therapy for your horse?

In an article in the spring edition of Country Zest & Style, EMC's Dr. Maureen Kelleher, clinical assistant professor of sports medicine and surgery, describes her highly personalized style of treatment for a very skittish five-year-old horse. 👇

issuu.com Personalities, Celebrations and Sporting Pursuits

Our Story

Virginia Tech’s Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center is a premier, full-service equine hospital located in Leesburg, Virginia, one of two hospitals of the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine. We offer advanced specialty care, 24-hour emergency treatment, and diagnostic services for all ages and breeds of horses. Our team of equine specialists in internal medicine, reproduction, sports medicine and rehabilitation, and surgery is committed to providing exceptional treatment for patients and superior service to clients; training today's and tomorrow’s veterinarians in the latest medical technologies and procedures; and advancing new knowledge through innovative scholarship and clinical discovery.

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Videos (show all)

In honor of EMC's residents, interns, and clinical support staff
Wellness Is Important to Us
Virginia Tech's Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center
Virginia Tech's Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center saves Chanceland Farm foal
What a difference a yearling makes: Tracks Magazine, fall 2019
Read the latest edition of Tracks Magazine, the flagship publication of VA-MD Vet Med!
Tracks Magazine, Fall 2019: Coming soon!
A Look Back at 2018
Youngkin Equine Soundness Clinic Dedication Event
Equine Athletic Wellness Program

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17690 Old Waterford Road
Leesburg, VA
20176
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