Akron UMC Head Start

Akron Head Start is an outreach program of the Akron United Methodist Church of Akron. CO

Akron Head Start provides quality preschool education for children ages three to five years old within a safe, healthy and educational environment and is free for all children enrolled.

Mission: "To Effectively Advocate for Enrolled Children and Families"

Akron Public Library

Washington County Connections

Washington county Mobile Pantry 6/22/20 Monday at the event center. Drive thru style. 9am until food runs out.
See you there!

Akron Swimming Pool

Washington County Connections

We will have size 4 & 5 diapers being delivered on Monday. If you need any baby items (diapers, wipes, formula) call and leave a message at 970-345-2225 ex 30 or 26

Washington County Connections

Come by and see us tonight during Akron's Cruise Night between 6-7:45 to get your FREE "sweet treat"! Don'tr forget, the first 25 youth under the age of 12 get a fun summer surprise as well. SEE YOU TONIGHT!!!

Washington County Connections

At the Washington County Event Center, beginning at 9am. For anyone who would benefit.

Mobile Pantry in Washington County will be on June 1st due to Memorial Day.

Zoo phonics letters R-Z

[05/11/20]   Powered by The Creative Curriculum®
Language and Literacy LL28
Stick Letters
Invite your child to join you at the table. Show them the collection of sticks, and explain that they will use the sticks to make letters. Demonstrate how to make a letter with the sticks.
"I'm going to make an M because that is the first letter in my name. Let me see how many sticks I will need."
Talk about the letters that are formed by only straight lines. Use alphabet cards for reference.
"Let's think about the letters we can make. We'll say the alphabet together and think about the shape of each letter as we name it."
Use alphabet cards if your child need guidance in making the letters. Discuss the difference between forming uppercase and lowercase letters.
"Remember that we made an L for Lori. What would the m look like if it wasn't the first letter in my name? Yes, it would be lowercase. Can we make a lowercase m with our craft sticks? Let's try it and see if it works."

Primary Objective/Dimension:
16a. Identifies and names letters
Related Objectives:
3a. Balances needs and rights of self and others
7a. Uses fingers and hands
8a. Comprehends language
11a. Attends and engages
13. Uses classification skills

Materials sticks, e.g., small branches, craft sticks, toothpicks, or chopsticks; alphabet cards

Possible Adjustments:
Provide a contrasting, nonslip surface on which the children can place the sticks.
Use larger materials, such as rods or cardboard tubes, which are easy to handle when making letters.
Provide foam or magnetic letters for children to handle when you talk about letters with straight lines.
Place contrasting tape down on the table to form the letter so children can place their sticks on top of the tape.
Include items with environmental print in children's home languages.
When introducing sounds, begin with those common to both English and English-language learners' home languages.

Things to Notice:
How many letters was the child able to create with the sticks?
How long was the child able to attend to this experience?
How did the child grasp and manipulate the materials to form letters?
This activity can be modified for any level of development your child is at. Do not worry about the color before the guidance. Look at the bolded requests and questions that follow as a developmental progression. If your child is able to accomplish the first expectation in bold, move on to the next. If they are not, stay with that expectation to support mastery.
Red / Orange
Encourage these children to join in the experience. They can explore materials, participate in conversation, and/or observe other children.
Yellow
Point to two contrasting letters on the alphabet cards (one with straight lines and another with curves). Talk about the lines that form each letter. Use sticks to make the straight letter with the child.
"We'll start with the first letter of the alphabet, A. It has straight lines. We can use the sticks to make an uppercase letter A. That's the same letter that starts Adam's name."
Green
Talk through each of the alphabet cards to identify the letters with straight lines. Set them aside for the child to use as a guide to form letters with the sticks.
"We can put the letters with straight lines over here. If we have a curved letter, it can go in a different pile. You found a T. That has straight lines. Where should we put it?"
Green / Blue
Invite the child to create stick letters without using the alphabet cards for guidance.
"You have an X in front of you. That letter has two straight lines. Can you think of another letter that has straight lines?"
Blue / Purple
Encourage the child to think about both uppercase and lowercase letters as she forms stick letters. Help her form all possible straight letters in the alphabet.
"You made all the straight uppercase letters. Let's think about what lowercase letters you can make."
Purple
Invite the child to think about words that can be spelled using only straight letters. Ask the child to use the sticks to spell out those words.
"It's tricky to think of words that only have straight lines. Should we do uppercase or lowercase? Yes, if we do only uppercase letters, then you can spell tall."

[05/11/20]   Powered by The Creative Curriculum®
Social Emotional SE23
Related Consequences
Notice a time when a child is engaged in an inappropriate behavior that does not pose great danger to the child or others.
Think of a way for children to experience the result of their actions (a related consequence).
Spills milk; cleans it up.
Dumps out all the blocks; puts them away.
Delays putting on shoes; doesn't go out on the playground until shoes are on.
Use a neutral tone of voice to explain the action and the related consequence.

Primary Objective/Dimension:
1b. Follows limits and expectations
Related Objectives:
1a. Manages feelings
1c. Takes care of own needs appropriately
2a. Forms relationships with adults
3a. Balances needs and rights of self and others
8b. Follows directions
9a. Uses an expanding expressive vocabulary
11a. Attends and engages
12b. Makes connections

Possible Adjustments:
Use simple words to state the connection between an action and the consequence. Use similar language each time to reinforce the action-consequence connection.
Make sure you have the child's attention before reminding him of the consequence of his actions.
When the child responds responsibly, encourage her by describing her actions.
Address children by name so they know they are being asked to participate.

Things to Notice:
How did the child respond to the related consequence? How did the child respond to you?
What feeling words, if any, did the child use to express his emotions?
If upset, how long did it take the child to calm himself?
This activity can be modified for any level of development your child is at. Do not worry about the color before the guidance. Look at the bolded requests and questions that follow as a developmental progression. If your child is able to accomplish the first expectation in bold, move on to the next. If they are not, stay with that expectation to support mastery.
Red / Orange
Encourage these children to join in the experience. They can explore materials, participate in conversation, and/or observe other children.
Yellow / Green
Use a related consequence while offering verbal, visual, and/or physical cues to help the child follow through.
Josiah, who is playing in the tub, pours water onto the floor. The parent uses the "Big Rule, Little Rule" strategy followed by a related consequence. "Be safe. Water stays in the tub," she says, pointing to the tub. She hands him a towel and says, "Here's a towel to clean up the spill." Josiah helps wipe up the water and then continues playing. The parent says, "It looks like you're filling up the big pitcher using the small, red cup." Josiah fills the cup again and pours the water onto the floor, laughing. The parent uses an "I" statement followed by a related consequence, "Water on the floor can be very slippery. I'm worried that someone might slip on it and hurt their body. If you are playing here you must keep the water in the tub." She helps Josiah wipe the water off the floor. A few minutes later, the parent notices Josiah pouring water onto the floor again. She says, in a neutral voice, "Here's the towel to clean up the spill, and then I can help you get out of the tub."
Josiah cleans the water on the floor. The parent helps Josiah get dressed, holds his hand as they walk away from the tub.
Green / Blue / Purple
Use a related consequence, encouraging the child to follow through as independently as possible.
Carly is playing at the water table, and she pours water onto the floor. The teacher positions herself at Carly's level and uses the "Big Rule, Little Rule" strategy followed by a related consequence. "Be safe. Water must stay in the water table. Do you want to use the mop or towel to clean that up?" Carly gets the mop, cleans up the water, and goes back to playing. The teacher says,
"Oh, it looks like you're using the funnel now to get the water into the tube." A few minutes later, the teacher notices Carly pouring cups of water onto the floor again. Her teacher uses an "I" statement followed by a related consequence. "Water on the floor can be very slippery. I'm worried that someone might slip on it and hurt their body." Then, in a neutral voice, the teacher says, "Looks like you need to get the mop to clean up the water. Then, you can find another place to play." After Carly mops up the water, her teacher asks, "Carly, where would you like to play now? We have those new star builders in Toys and Games, or maybe you'd like to look at some of the library books about rabbits."

[05/11/20]   Powered by The Creative Curriculum®
Mathematics M23
Putting Puzzles Together
Invite the children to join you in putting together a puzzle. Demonstrate or explain how each piece fits in a specific space.
"This puzzle piece is shaped like a crescent; we need to find a space on the puzzle that has the same shape. What happens if we try to put the crescent piece in the square space? You're right; it doesn't fit."
Prompt the children to describe each piece they choose and then look for the corresponding space on the puzzle.
"Taylor, you showed me that part of the rabbit's ear is on the puzzle piece. Can you look on the puzzle for more of the rabbit's body? That might give us a clue as to where the piece goes."
"Ana, what does this outline look like to you? Yes, it's a pair of scissors. Can you find the scissors that match the shape on the paper?"

Primary Objective/Dimension:
21b. Understands shapes
Related Objectives:
3a. Balances needs and rights of self and others
7a. Uses fingers and hands
8b. Follows directions
9b. Speaks clearly
11b. Persists
14a. Thinks symbolically

Materials puzzles or puzzle cards

Possible Adjustments:
Place the shapes on an incline board or light box to make them easier to see.
Use larger shapes made of thicker material to make them easier to see and pick up.
Provide a photograph of the completed puzzle for children to look at as they work.
Glue a knob to the top of a puzzle piece for easier handling.
Address children by name so they know they are being asked to participate.
Ask children to repeat a simple phrase you have said and modeled. For example, when putting puzzles together, say, "This piece shows the dog's tail.
Tell your friend, 'This piece shows the dog's tail.'"

Things to Notice:
What shapes did the child recognize and describe?
Was the child able to grasp and fit puzzle pieces into the appropriate spaces?
How long did the child persist with this experience?
This activity can be modified for any level of development your child is at. Do not worry about the color before the guidance. Look at the bolded requests and questions that follow as a developmental progression. If your child is able to accomplish the first expectation in bold, move on to the next. If they are not, stay with that expectation to support mastery.
Red / Orange
Encourage these children to join in the experience. They can explore materials, participate in conversation, and/or observe other children.
Yellow
Use a puzzle with two or three shapes, or a homemade puzzle of two or three outlined items. Help the child identify the shapes as he or she completes the puzzle.
"You're holding the triangle. It has three sides. Can you find where it belongs on the puzzle?"
Green
Invite the child to complete a simple puzzle of up to five pieces without assistance. Prompt the child to talk about the shape of each piece.
"Simon, you only have two pieces left to put in the puzzle! Which piece will you choose next? Describe it to me."
Green / Blue
Use puzzles that have objects representing shapes, e.g., a kite in the shape of a diamond, a pizza in the shape of a circle, etc. Invite the child to name and describe the shapes as she completes the puzzle.
"You found a piece with a soccer ball on it. What shape do you need to look for on the puzzle? Yes, a circle is round like a ball."
Blue / Purple
Encourage the child to work independently on a puzzle with many pieces. If assistance is needed, remind him to rotate pieces in each space to see if they fit.
"Aron, you found the piece with four sides, and you found the space with four sides. It doesn't seem to fit the way you are holding it now. Can you turn the piece and try it another way?"
Purple
Invite the child to play with challenging puzzles that have small, similar-looking pieces. Encourage her to notice the details to place them in the appropriate puzzle space.
"This puzzle has 25 pieces! You'll need to look closely at the shape and picture on each piece to figure out where it belongs."

[05/11/20]   Powered by The Creative Curriculum®
Physical P23
Ways to Travel
Invite the children to join you in a large indoor or outdoor space to explore a variety of different ways to travel in space.
Make sure the space is clean and safe, as children may be moving in different ways and directions on the ground or floor. For safety reasons, ensure that there is enough room between the children to move safely.
Invite the children to explore different body movements. Be careful not to tell them how to move, but allow them to imagine how objects and animals move.
"How does a car move around a track?"
"How does a snake move?"
"How does an elephant move?"
"Move softly like a deer in the woods."

Primary Objective/Dimension:
4. Demonstrates traveling skills
Related Objectives:
3a. Balances needs and rights of self and others
3b. Solves social problems
5. Demonstrates balancing skills
8b. Follows directions
9a. Uses an expanding expressive vocabulary
11a. Attends and engages
14b. Engages in sociodramatic play
21a. Understands spatial relationships
25. Demonstrates knowledge of the characteristics of living things
35. Explores dance and movement concepts

Materials large indoor or outdoor space

Possible Adjustments:
Suggest movements that all children can make.
Pair children so that one can model a movement for another.
Demonstrate, describe, and practice a few movements together before children explore on their own.
Show pictures or point to objects that illustrate or explain unfamiliar words.
Ask children to repeat a simple phrase you have said and modeled. For example, when moving in different ways, say, "I'm sliding like a slug."
Tell your friend, 'I'm sliding like a slug.'"

Things to Notice:
Was the child able to move in creative ways?
Did the child understand how different animals move?
Was the child able to move through space keeping the head up and eyes forward without bumping into peers?
How long was the child able to participate in this activity?
This activity can be modified for any level of development your child is at. Do not worry about the color before the guidance. Look at the bolded requests and questions that follow as a developmental progression. If your child is able to accomplish the first expectation in bold, move on to the next. If they are not, stay with that expectation to support mastery.

Red / Orange
Encourage these children to join in the experience. They can explore materials, participate in conversation, and/or observe other children.
Yellow
Demonstrate and practice moving safely with the child.
"Walk around the room and stay far away from your friends."
"If you see someone getting close to you, it is your job to move away."
Green
Demonstrate traveling like an animal and invite the child to explore the movement with you.
"Show me how a snake moves."
"Travel like a lion through the tall grass."
"How does a frog jump from one lily pad to the next?"
Green / Blue
Challenge the child to travel in different directions and pathways and at various speeds.
"Can your car drive slowly in a large circle?"
"Show me how the fireman stretches the long ladder to the window on the top floor."
"Pretend you are a butterfly and fly in a zigzag line so you will not get caught in the net."
Blue / Purple
Challenge the child to travel through an obstacle course in a variety of different ways.
"Climb on your motorbike and ride around the cones and through the obstacle course."
"Our space today has obstacles that look like a jungle. Travel through the jungle like a zebra."
Purple
Provide the child with a variety of different obstacles. Ask him to create an obstacle course and travel in different ways through the course.
"Think of three different ways to move through the course you have created."
"Can you find a partner and follow them through the course moving exactly as they do?"
Pink / Silver / Brown
Observe the children moving in new ways and describe what you see.
"Georgia, I see you moving slowly like a snail. You are sliding your feet instead of walking."
Continue the game for as long as it interests the children.

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Videos (show all)

Zoo phonics letters I-Q
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Show & Tell
Zoo Phonics

Telephone

Address


902 E 1st St
Akron, CO
80720

Opening Hours

Monday 07:30 - 16:00
Tuesday 07:30 - 16:00
Wednesday 07:30 - 16:00
Thursday 07:30 - 16:00
Friday 08:00 - 12:00
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ABC Development Center ABC Development Center
481 Ash Ave.
Akron, 80720

ABC is a high quality care and early childhood education center for child ages 6 weeks to 12 years old.